What do you think? Leave a respectful comment.

Culture Canvas

A weekly roundup of arts and culture headlines.


Click to enlarge.

The only privately owned version of Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” is going up for auction in May, via the BBC. The painting went on view in London ahead of the sale and is expected to go for $80 million. Above, gallery technicians at Sotheby’s adjust the painting on Thursday. Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images.

*

The U.S. Justice Department filed an antitrust lawsuit against Apple and five major publishing companies for colluding to raise the price of e-books sold on Amazon, via The New York Times. The Hachette Book Group, Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins have agreed to a settlement; Macmillan and Penguin Group USA have not. Amazon said the move will benefit Kindle owners, but Scott Turow, the president of the Authors Guild, cautioned a month ago that the move would quash “real competition in order to save the appearance of competition… This would be tragic for all of us who value books, and the culture they support.”

Amazon is bankrolling efforts by The Brooklyn Book Festival, the PEN American Center, the Los Angeles Review of Books, One Story, Poets & Writers, Kenyon Review, 826 Seattle, Girls Write Now, the Lambda Literary Foundation, Voice of Witness and Words Without Borders through grants. Alexander Saitchik at Salon wonders whether Amazon is supporting the independent publishing it has historically threatened or is hoping to quell criticism.

We’ll have more on the lawsuit on Thursday’s NewsHour program.

*

Greg Mortenson, the author of “Three Cups of Tea,” must pay back $1 million to his charity, via CBS. A 60 Minutes investigation of Mortenson questioned the accuracy of his book, and a subsequent inquiry by the state of Montana showed that he used the charity’s funds for personal expenses.

*

The National Endowment for the Arts is cutting $1 million dollars to fund arts related programming on PBS, via The New York Times.

*

‘The Lion King’ is now the highest grossing musical of all time, via The Wall Street Journal.

*

Websites can now embed a Spotify Play Button, allowing users to stream music from other sites, via The Guardian.

*

Nintendo and the Louvre have teamed up to offer an extensive audiovisual guide to museum visitors, with 700 commentaries, supplementary visuals and — this is key — a convenient map, via NintendoLife.

Art Beat recently covered a new exhibit about video games at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

*

Singer and movie star Marta Eggerth just turned 100, and she is still singing, via The Washington Post.

*

Scientific American suggests that origin stories are a key part of human cognition.

*

Flavorwire has a slide show of 10 unusual book designs, from the culinary to the horticultural.

*

Former poet laureate Reed Whittemore died last Friday at the age of 92.

*

Experimental writer Christine Brook-Rose died March 21 at the age of 89. Her death was reported this week.

*

Mauricio Lasansky, who used print-making to depict Nazism and its brutalities, died Monday at the age of 97.

*

Popular artist Thomas Kinkade died last Friday at the age of 54. His paintings and spin-off products are on display in as many as ten million American homes.

The Latest