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Attorney Ken Starr speaks as U.S. President Donald Trump's legal team resumes its presentation of opening arguments in Trump's Senate impeachment trial in this frame grab from video shot in the U.S. Senate Chamber at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 27, 2020. U.S. Senate TV/Handout via Reuters

Here’s a spreadsheet of every question asked during the Senate impeachment trial

There are 329 million people in the United States, but just 100 of them were able to ask questions at the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.

Those are the U.S. Senators who were allowed 16 hours to complete that task.

For the last two days, they were permitted to ask questions individually, or in groups. All questions were written and short enough to fit on a notecard. (Some pushed those boundaries.) What did they ask?

Throughout Wednesday and Thursday’s sessions, the PBS NewsHour team tracked every question in the spreadsheet below. You can see what senators asked, as well as which topics got the most attention.

Graphic by Megan McGrew based on questions collected and analyzed by PBS NewsHour’s Lisa Desjardins

Graphic by Megan McGrew Based on questions collected and analyzed by PBS NewsHour’s Lisa Desjardins.

The vast majority of the questions were considered “friendly”–the questions were asked to the supporting side and were meant to allow that side to further make their case. Some questions were “challenging”–asked to the opposing side in an effort to expose weaknesses in their arguments. Only a handful were “open”–appeared to genuinely seek an answer to a question.

You can see all the questions the senators asked and the respective topics in the spreadsheet below.

See the full spreadsheet.

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