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2016 Iowa caucus election special

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    Welcome to our "PBS NewsHour" special coverage of the presidential caucuses in Iowa. I'm Gwen Ifill.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And I'm Judy Woodruff in Des Moines in the capital city of Des Moines on the campus of Drake University, as the caucus results are all but almost completely in, and the shape of the presidential race has been changed.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The people of Iowa have kicked off the presidential year tonight with big turnouts and big surprises.

    On the Republican side, with nearly all caucus sites reporting, the Associated Press projects Ted Cruz has won, defeating Donald Trump, who led in public opinion polls before today. Marco Rubio ran a strong third, nearly even with Trump.

    The Democratic race is still too close to call, with Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders running almost dead even and some sites yet to report.

    The Republicans are already coming out to assess their performances. Donald Trump and Marco Rubio spoke a short while ago, separately.

    DONALD TRUMP (R), Republican Presidential Candidate: We finished second. And I want to tell you something. I'm just honored. I'm really honored. And I want to congratulate Ted. And I want to congratulate all of the incredible candidates, including Mike Huckabee, who has become a really good friend of mine. So, congratulations to everybody.

    SEN. MARCO RUBIO (R-FL), Republican Presidential Candidate: For months, they told us, because we didn't have the right endorsements or the right political connections, we had no chance.

    They told me that we had no chance because my hair wasn't gray enough and my boots were too high.

    (LAUGHTER)

    (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • SEN. MARCO RUBIO:

    They told me I needed to wait my turn, that I needed to wait in line.

    (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • SEN. MARCO RUBIO:

    But, tonight, tonight, here in Iowa, the people of this great state have sent a very clear message. After seven years of Barack Obama, we are not waiting any longer to take our country back.

    (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The results in Iowa have also started to winnow the field. Republican Mike Huckabee tweeted a short while ago that he is dropping out. He won just 2 percent support tonight.

    And Democratic — and Democrat Martin O'Malley announced he's suspending his campaign after garnering just 1 percent.

    Judy joins us now from Des Moines for a closer look at what is behind the results so far.

    Judy, two interesting things in those two speeches. Marco Rubio, who came in third, looks like he came in — gave a speech like he came in first. And Donald Trump was very subdued and brief.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Exactly, Gwen.

    I was listening to Marco Rubio, thinking, if you didn't know what the numbers were, you would think that he was the first-place finisher, rather than the third-place finisher. We don't have the final numbers yet from Republicans, but Marco Rubio clearly believes he's riding something important out of Iowa.

    He has come in first among the so called establishment candidates. He's not the outsider that Donald Trump and Ted Cruz were portrayed as being. And there's no question, after listening to Rubio tonight and talking to people in his campaign, that they plan to take that to New Hampshire, to South Carolina and beyond, and try to claim that mantle and pick up the support of people who were looking at other establishment Republicans.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    You know, Judy, one of the things that you did tonight was go visit a couple of caucuses where there was a lot of turnout. But it turns out that turnout wasn't necessarily for the outsiders.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Well, exactly right.

    And in the case of Donald Trump, the Iowa poll, the vaunted Iowa poll had forecast that he would likely come in first on the strength of that outsider appeal, the man who had never run for public office before. It's clear that Donald Trump did something special in this race. He shook things up in a way that we haven't seen American politics shaken up.

    I think Ted Cruz can attribute some of the energy in his campaign, and so can the other candidates, to what Donald Trump brought. But, in the end, what Donald Trump wanted clearly was a victory. He had members of his family today predicting he would come in first. He didn't do that.

    And, right now, he's very close to third place — to Marco Rubio, who is coming in third. So, we still have to see that Donald Trump coming in second.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Among the Democrats, this is still too close to call, last we checked. Do we — have we heard anything from either the Sanders or the Clinton campaign that tells us what they think is going on?

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Well, the Clinton camp was starting to talk to reporters, Gwen, a little while ago and saying or suggesting that they thought Hillary Clinton had won.

    That — they have backed off of that. And at least the last numbers I saw, they were within two-tenths of a percentage point apart. She was at 49.8. He was at 49.6. There may be new numbers since then. But that's clearly not the margin of victory that Hillary Clinton wanted to ride out of Iowa.

    And it is a far cry from what the Clinton camp had just a few months ago. Her — her — or, I should say, Bernie Sanders' support has climbed steadily since he started putting so much effort and energy into this state. And I would say that that must give her campaign a lot of headaches to go to sleep on tonight, if they get any sleep at all.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    One less headache — Judy, we will be back with you in a few.

    One less headache for them is, as we heard earlier, Iowa marks the end of the road for some tonight.

    Democrat Martin O'Malley spoke this evening in Des Moines after suspending his long-shot campaign.

    MARTIN O'MALLEY (D), Democratic Presidential Candidate: Words cannot express how grateful I am to all of you, my true friends, who have helped me in waging this courageous battle.

    When I got into this eight months ago, I had no doubt that it would be anything but a tough fight. And it is a tough fight. But I have always been drawn to a tough fight. And I felt, when I got into this, as I looked down the road, I felt very firmly that our country was scanning the horizon, looking for new possibilities and new leadership and a way to heal our divisions and move us forward.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And I'm joined now about Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report.

    So, Amy, we have got something to talk about.

    (LAUGHTER)

  • AMY WALTER, The Cook Political Report:

    We have a lot.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    We have got — we have got real numbers, real results. They're not final in these contests.

  • AMY WALTER:

    Right.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    But you have already got Ted Cruz declaring victory on the Republican side.

    But let's talk about the Democrats first.

  • AMY WALTER:

    Absolutely.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    O'Malley dropping out, suspending his campaign. And look at how close it is between Clinton and Sanders.

  • AMY WALTER:

    Well, the conventional wisdom going into this race was that higher turnout helps Sanders and helps Trump.

    It's clearly helping Sanders. It wasn't enough to help Trump. One thing is, I'm trying to dig through a lot of these entrance polls, is to look for, what were some signs for why Sanders is doing so well?

    The turnout among young people wasn't as high as it was back in 2008, when Barack Obama turned all those young people out. But the margin was huge. If these entrances polls are right, he got something like 48 percent, Sanders did, among young people. That is much higher than Obama, who got something like 60 percent.

    So, I think what you're seeing is, the numbers might not translate, but the enthusiasm was strong enough.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And what I was hearing from pollsters was that the support — and this is really what you are saying — the support that Sanders is getting from young people was overwhelming the support that Hillary Clinton was getting from women.

  • AMY WALTER:

    Yes. That's right.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    She was counting on women. She was counting on younger women.

  • AMY WALTER:

    She was counting on women and older voters.

    And more older voters turned out in this election, people over the age of 65, than turned out than in 2008, but they didn't give her the same margins that they — that the young people gave to Bernie Sanders.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Let's talk about what happened — what is happening on the Republican side. It is true what Donald Trump said. When he came into Iowa, it wasn't assumed this was his kind of place.

    (LAUGHTER)

  • AMY WALTER:

    Right.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    But, in the last few weeks and months, he's climbed in the polls. And, yes, he was overtaken by Ted Cruz, but there was a sense going into tonight that Donald Trump would do very well. He was forecast first in the highly respected Iowa poll.

  • AMY WALTER:

    Right. He had gone sort of up and down through the polls in the last few months, where he was a little bit ahead, a little bit behind. If he finishes in second, then he would be somewhere in that polling average.

    Look, I think, with Donald Trump, I think your point is correct, that he energized clearly a whole new group of people to come out and vote and participate in this process. We also saw that he got support among all different kinds of groups, including evangelicals. He did pretty well, considering that he is not from that traditional lane and didn't campaign as an evangelical.

    The other interesting thing I noticed in the exit polls, or entrance polls, as they call them here, because they get people before they go in.

    (CROSSTALK)

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    On their way in, right.

  • AMY WALTER:

    Yes, is that what you found was that more people said — barely, though — said that they wanted somebody who was new, wasn't experienced; 49 percent picked that.

    But 45 percent said they want an experience candidate. Of the 45 percent who said they wanted an experienced candidate, 3 percent gave Trump their vote, and 39 percent gave it to Rubio, Cruz right behind him on that.

    So, there were more people that turned out, but a lot of people who turned out were looking for somebody that wasn't necessarily in the Trump mold.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And…

  • AMY WALTER:

    So, that is why this turnout didn't necessarily translate for Trump.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Well — and exactly. And so the shaking up or the energy that Trump brought, some of it hurt him. It caused people to think harder about the race…

  • AMY WALTER:

    Exactly.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    … but say, I don't want Donald Trump going in.

    Just very quickly, Amy, what does Marco Rubio do coming out of Iowa?

  • AMY WALTER:

    Well, as you said, he positioned himself as the winner, and goes into New Hampshire saying, I am the candidate. Forget about Bush, forget about Kasich. I'm the only person that can be the true non-Trump, non-Cruz candidate, the only one who can win the Electoral College as it's currently set up.

    And we will see. But Trump still has a pretty strong lead, if we believe polling now.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    At least he did in the last poll.

  • AMY WALTER:

    He did have a very strong lead in New Hampshire.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Right.

  • AMY WALTER:

    And it's going to be critical for Rubio to be able to come out of New Hampshire saying that I have won something.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And then there is John Kasich.

    (CROSSTALK)

  • AMY WALTER:

    That's right.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Amy Walter, we thank you.

  • AMY WALTER:

    Thanks.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And we will see you back in D.C.

  • AMY WALTER:

    Indeed.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Thanks — Gwen.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Thanks, Judy.

    Now we want to dig into the numbers a little bit, going beyond the results for key facts about the Iowans who are kicking off this election season.

    Hari Sreenivasan breaks it down — Hari.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    Thanks, Gwen.

    Our data team looked to see Iowa's track record in picking winners and how similar Iowans are to the rest of the country. The caucuses are far from a perfect predictor of who goes on to become the party's nominee or eventually to the White House.

    In fact, for Democrats, it is slightly better than flipping a coin. The caucuses have picked the candidate correctly 55 percent of the time. For Republicans, the process has only been right 43 percent of the time.

    For example, in 1992, three-quarters of Iowa Democrats stood behind longtime Iowa Senator Tom Harkin. That year, Bill Clinton only received 3 percent of the votes, but later went on to serve two terms as president.

    We do have better indicators today to which candidate has been on the minds of Iowans in the week leading up to tonight. Over the last week, Facebook users in Iowa had more to say about Donald Trump than any other presidential candidate, Republican or Democrat. You saw that same trend nationwide. Behind Trump on the Republican side were Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, and Ben Carson. And among Democrats, Iowans had the most to say about Hillary Clinton, followed by Bernie Sanders and then Martin O'Malley.

    Of the issues that most concerned Iowans on Facebook, crime and criminal justice, abortion, taxes and the Affordable Care Act, there was only one topic the rest of the country was talking about. That's Wall Street and financial regulation. According to Facebook, the rest of the nation is also talking about topics including religion, racism and discrimination, jobs and Benghazi.

    But who are today's Iowans, and how do they compare to the rest of the country? They register to vote slightly more than the rest of the nation. In 2012, three out of four Iowans were registered, vs. two out of three Americans. Among Iowans 18 or older, the state's median household income is $53,712, almost exactly the national average.

    And the poverty rate, 11 percent, is also similar the rest of the United States. But there is a significant difference. And that's race. According to the census, about nine out of 10 Iowans are white. Nationwide, that number is far lower, about two-thirds. Fewer Latino and African-American voters call Iowa home, compared to the rest of the nation.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Thanks, Hari.

    And now to the analysis of Brooks and Cottle. That is Michelle Cottle of "The Atlantic" and David Brooks, columnist with The New York Times. Mark Shields has been under the weather, but we look forward to his full recovery and his return to our campaign coverage very soon.

    So, David, I asked you at 6:00, at our earlier program, what was the difference between emotion and organization? Now that we know that Ted Cruz has won, that Marco Rubio has said he has won, essentially, and that Donald Trump has kind of slung off to New Hampshire, saying he will revisit this whole thing, what do you think won, organization or passion?

  • DAVID BROOKS, The New York Times:

    Well, I guess it was organization. It certainly wasn't Donald Trump.

    I think the big story of the night is that Donald Trump underperformed. He underperformed because he's been a show business candidate. And we were always curious — we were curious to see if the show business were turn into substance. But, like a lot of spectacle, it was more flash than substance.

    And I think we can expect that in the states ahead. There is no reason to think why his supporters would come out to vote anymore in New Hampshire or anywhere else. So, I think — I don't know if he will lose New Hampshire, but I think we can expect some underperformance.

    The second thing we learned on the Republican side is that history has not been suspended. This looks a little — a lot more normal than it did before tonight. We have got a conservative candidate. We have got Ted Cruz, who looks — who inherited a lot of that Rick Santorum, Mike Huckabee vote, who won the previous two caucuses. He is obviously stronger than they going forward.

    But he looks like the conservative candidates Iowans traditionally like. Marco Rubio looks like the one candidate who can unify. This is clearly his moment. A panicked Republican establishment is now going to turn their face to him. The question for Rubio is, can he acknowledge the Trump phenomenon and reach out to those people and be the one who can unify the party?

  • GWEN IFILL:

    How about overperformed — or who overperformed and who underperformed tonight, Michelle?

  • MICHELLE COTTLE, The Atlantic:

    I think Rubio actually did a pretty good job of beating the expectations game.

    And I know it's late, but if you listen closely, you can hear the Republican establishment gearing up to just rally around him and push him through.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    You can hear the wind of relief?

  • MICHELLE COTTLE:

    That's right. You can hear the sigh of relief going out.

    And David's right. Ted Cruz will declare victory, but this turns into a vastly more conventional Iowa caucus. You have the social conservative who came out on top. And then, you know, you go from there. And they will go into New Hampshire, and we will just kind of see how it shakes out. But Trump missed his moment with this.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Well, let's talk a little bit about the Democratic side, because that is still truly up in the air, as far as we can tell, David.

    Bernie Sanders, if you listen to what Amy Walter was just telling us, really has found a way to at least nip at the heels of Hillary Clinton tonight. We don't know how it's going to turn out yet, but it's not insignificant.

  • DAVID BROOKS:

    Yes. At this moment, we don't know who will win, but we do know that Bernie Sanders can turn out his people. And that was also the question, because he had a lot of first-time voters, he had a lot of younger voters.

    They had to spread around the state to go to the key districts. And they did that. And so Bernie Sanders, A, looks like a lot better executive and organizer than Donald Trump on the Republican side, because he turned his people out. And so, as we go forward, again, Iowa, New Hampshire, Vermont were his three best states.

    So, we can — it is not like it is a cakewalk for Bernie Sanders, but he has proven to be a potent force, and Hillary Clinton looks still the dominant favorite, but a lot more vulnerable than she did a few hours ago.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    You know, Michelle, one of the things we know for sure about Iowa, it lends itself to interpretation.

    So, in the same way that we had Marco Rubio acting like he won tonight, even though he came in third, we still know that, no matter what this — how this turns out between Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, both of them can say they did OK.

  • MICHELLE COTTLE:

    They can. And I think, unfortunately, for the Clinton campaign, there is the narrative of, uh-oh, deja vu, she was the inevitable going in, and it has happened again.

    And she's going to have to survive a news cycle of that as they go into New Hampshire, whereas Sanders was considered a joke until not that long ago. And now he can declare victory, irregardless of who actually comes out on top.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Is Bernie Sanders — let me stick with you for a moment. Is Bernie Sanders' ability to rise above the joke factor, as you put it, is it a result of an anti-Hillary feeling out there in the party, or is it a sense that he is actually a legitimate and viable future president of the United States for a lot of people?

  • MICHELLE COTTLE:

    I don't know that it's anti-Hillary feeling, so much as kind of anti the way things have — you know, anti-establishment, which we're seeing a lot of places.

    As for whether or not he is a viable candidate nationwide, we have to go back to what we were talking about earlier, which is that his three best states are Vermont, New Hampshire and Iowa, in terms of who his base is. And, again, it's the Democratic primary. He's going to have to prove that he can talk to minority voters and non-liberals before he's going to be able to make real inroads into anything past New Hampshire.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And South Carolina, of course, is the first big test of that diversity question.

  • MICHELLE COTTLE:

    Yes.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    David, did — did Marco Rubio and did Ted Cruz especially prove tonight that you can take on Donald Trump and live to tell the tale?

  • DAVID BROOKS:

    Well, I don't know if I would give them credit for that, because they didn't run ads against him barely.

    I think Trump sacrificed his own. He has defeated himself. And, frankly, I thought his concession speech was a little delusional. It was fine. It was nice. But he didn't acknowledge the defeat. And his is a campaign that — where success has been built on success. He claims he's in the campaign because he's a winner. But now is he not a winner, so how does he justify the campaign?

    So, I think it was more self-immolation. But Cruz is a strong candidate. One of the reasons he and Sanders are strong is, as polls have shown all year, the parties are polarizing. The number of people who call themselves extremely progressive is up. The number of people who call themselves extremely conservative is up.

    And so Cruz and Sanders are stronger than their earlier versions, the Santorums or the Howard Deans, and so they benefit from the polarization of the country. They are closer to the heart of where their parties are than would have been the case five, 10 years ago.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And, briefly, a word for the exiting candidates tonight, Martin O'Malley on the Democratic side, Mike Huckabee on the Republican side. Does their exit make any difference? Or did their presence make a difference?

    (LAUGHTER)

  • MICHELLE COTTLE:

    You know, I was in Iowa with Martin O'Malley over the summer a little bit. And there were a lot of Sanders voters at the O'Malley events. So, it's not like he was…

  • GWEN IFILL:

    He had traction of his own.

  • MICHELLE COTTLE:

    He wasn't electrifying a lot of the voters there. So, I doubt his exit is going to make much of an issue.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And in addition to Mike Huckabee's withdrawal tonight, David, we have Ben Carson saying he is taking a break from the campaign to go get some fresh clothes.

    (LAUGHTER)

  • DAVID BROOKS:

    Yes. You know, they do have laundries. They do have washing machines in these places.

    Yes. I — these are — we're going to see the campaign not narrow immediately, but I think some of these nice guys who are genuinely good guys are going to drop out. It's sort of amazing that Huckabee and Santorum, the two previous winners, basically registered very little, a lot of fickleness there, in part because other — other forces have just come in and displaced them. I'm not sure their departure will mean much.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    David Brooks joining us from New Haven tonight, Michelle Cottle with me here in Washington, thank you both very much.

    And now I'm joined by Lisa Desjardins, who will take us a little bit deeper into what these numbers tell us, and especially who voted and where.

  • LISA DESJARDINS:

    Fascinating things we're seeing on the maps tonight.

    I want to go straight to the Republican race, where we have Ted Cruz coming out on top. If you look at the map of Iowa and you look at the numbers that we have from the race tonight, look at these key areas we talked about before.

    That upper northwest corner, the conservative corner, Ted Cruz did win there, but I think what is notable, Gwen, Marco Rubio did well up there as well.

    Look at Des Moines. Here is where Marco Rubio really soared. He won two of the hugest counties in Iowa. So, those numbers are really what pushed him up to number three.

    Trump, where did he do well. He did well sort of on the corners, around the sides. And I compared this to past races. He did well in counties that just barely went for John McCain, sort of a strange moderate, warm Republican area.

    Hard to say what generated that. But I do think what we see from these numbers is, this looks like what three-man races look like. It's interesting.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Wow.

    Is this what — do these numbers also explain why things are still so tight as a ticket, as Dan Rather used to say, among the Democrats?

  • LISA DESJARDINS:

    Yes.

    And I think what we're seeing at this exact second are the important numbers from the bigger counties coming in that will determine this. Let's look at the Democratic map, and, in particular, want to see that those university towns we have been talking about all night, they didn't all go for Bernie Sanders to the degree that he wanted.

    We saw a couple went 60/40, but look at the University of Northern Iowa, Black Hawk County. That is a deep blue county, went heavily for President Obama in the general election. Tonight, Bernie Sanders is winning that county by just four points or so.

    That's a place where he was expected to just cream Hillary Clinton. Not happening. Now, is that because she out-organized him? Is it because somehow she generated some electricity in that county? It's hard to say. But when you look at where she's winning across the board, not just college towns, it's everywhere, Gwen. It's not one type of county or another. And, to me, that says that is someone who is well-organized.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    I wonder if the map begins to fall apart in some of the conventional wisdom about Iowa as well, because the Obama coalition doesn't exactly exist anymore, for instance.

  • LISA DESJARDINS:

    That's right.

    And that is what I like about these maps. I think we are seeing a completely new way of looking at Iowa, completely new way for candidates to approach it. Sure, you can do as well as Marco Rubio did by taking care of Des Moines, doing well there.

    But I think the successful candidates tonight, especially Ted Cruz, organized everywhere, got out their people everywhere, and didn't play this game of sort of sectional voters as much as we have seen in the past.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    So, that cliche did pay off, which is, organization, organization, organization does pay off in Iowa for these caucuses.

  • LISA DESJARDINS:

    Yes. I think that's right, and also maybe the cliche of three tickets out of Iowa for the Republicans, at least, not three tickets for Democrats, but…

  • GWEN IFILL:

    That's because the third was so far down.

  • LISA DESJARDINS:

    That's right.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Otherwise, maybe there would have been. It's fascinating to watch, fascinating to understand why. And thank you so much.

  • LISA DESJARDINS:

    My pleasure.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Judy, we're back with you.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Hi, Gwen.

    You know, as I'm listening to these conversations you're having with Lisa and with David and Michelle Cottle, I'm thinking Iowa is often derided for having these caucuses. They're kind of a strange animal when it comes to our political process. But, once again, Iowa has reshaped this president — a presidential contest.

    Look on the Republican side. Ted Cruz, someone who has had a — already a controversial career in the Senate, is coming out of here with a clear win. And unlike the last two elections, when you had Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum as the Republican winner, Ted Cruz is someone who has the ability to go on. He has raised money. He has proven his organization statewide. He can go on and do something with this win out of Iowa.

    And on the Democratic side, you have been talking about it. This is a state that put the fear of God into Hillary Clinton. She came into the state thinking this was going to be a place she could not easily take, because she struggled here in 2008 against Barack Obama, but never in their wildest imagination did they think they were going to face the kind of thing that Bernie Sanders put together.

    It's really something. When you look — I looked at some numbers just before we came out here tonight. Bernie Sanders did very well across this state. There is a lot of excitement — we talked about it with Amy Walter — across the board, ages, young, old, demographics up and down.

    And this is for, as we said, a Democratic socialist in the United States Senate, so a lot of surprise on the Democratic side. We're still watching those final numbers to see that Hillary Clinton pulls it out, but, boy, it sure has — has kept us on our toes.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Sure has, Judy.

    And thanks for all of your reporting out there in Iowa. It has been amazing.

    Now we have Senator Ted Cruz, the Republican winner tonight. He spoke to supporters moments ago.

    SEN. TED CRUZ (R-TX), Republican Presidential Candidate: Tonight, the state of Iowa has spoken.

    (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • SEN. TED CRUZ:

    Iowa has sent notice that the Republican nominee and the next president of the United States will not be chosen by the media.

    (CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

  • SEN. TED CRUZ:

    Will not be chosen by the Washington establishment.

    (CHEERS AND APPLAUSE).

  • SEN. TED CRUZ:

    Will not be chosen by the lobbyists.

    (CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

  • SEN. TED CRUZ:

    But will be chosen by the most incredible, powerful force, where all sovereignty resides in our nation, by we, the people, the American people.

    (CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

  • GWEN IFILL:

    So, recapping the headlines of this presidential caucus night in Iowa, Ted Cruz bested Donald Trump in the Republican race, with Marco Rubio a close third. Cruz said his win shows the strength of conservatives against Washington insiders.

    Good night, Judy, from Iowa.

    Thanks for joining us.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    That wraps up our coverage from here. We will see you later.

    I'm Judy Woodruff. Good night.

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