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As Trump outlines White House goals, signs of division in his party

On Thursday, presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump laid out the goals for his first 100 days in office, including designing a Mexican border wall and banning Muslim immigration. Meanwhile his top aides made behind-the-scenes overtures to party figures for support. Trailing Democratic candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders kept up the fight in West Virginia. John Yang reports.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Republican Donald Trump gets back to campaigning tonight, now that he's virtually wrapped up the GOP nomination for president. But as he works to win over voters, he faces new resistance from leaders in his own party. The latest example came today from Paul Ryan, speaker of the House of Representatives.

    We begin our coverage with John Yang, who's covering tonight's Trump event in West Virginia.

    (BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

  • JOHN YANG:

    For Donald Trump, tonight's event in Charleston isn't about next week's primary, it's all about winning the fall campaign.

  • MARK KEYSER, Trump Supporter:

    He come out, he won Indiana, secured the nomination and one of the first things that come out of his mouth was we're going to help people in West Virginia, we're going to help people in Pennsylvania, we're going to get coal back on the market.

  • JOHN YANG:

    And in today's "New York Times," Trump outlined goals for his first 100 days in office. They include: designing the wall he says he'll build on the Mexican border, stopping Muslim immigration, auditing the Federal Reserve, and repealing the Affordable Care Act.

    He also went on CNBC, making his economic pitch to voters.

    DONALD TRUMP (R), Republican Presidential Candidate: They have two jobs in some cases, and they're making less money than they made 20 years ago. And that's why you're wondering what's going on and why they're not liking Republicans or Democrats. I mean, they're not liking either, to be honest with you.

  • JOHN YANG:

    But there's was new evidence that Trump has a long way to go to rally his own party behind him. House Speaker Paul Ryan said today, he's not ready to back Trump, and there was more. "Politico" obtained a recording of Republican Senator John McCain speaking at a recent fundraiser.

    SEN. JOHN MCCAIN (R), Arizona: If Donald Trump is at the top of the ticket, here in Arizona, with over 30 percent of the vote being the Hispanic vote, no doubt that this may be the race of my life.

  • JOHN YANG:

    Nevertheless, top Trump aides have begun the behind the scenes overtures to party leaders. They've already had some success. A number of Republican members of Congress, are signing up to lend their support.

    Meanwhile, the Democrats are still battling. Bernie Sanders is in West Virginia, too.

    SEN. BERNIE SANDERS (I-VT), Democratic Presidential Candidate: It's about time we started in the wealthiest nation in the world to talk about poverty.

    (CHEERS)

  • JOHN YANG:

    Still dogging Hillary Clinton despite her big lead in delegates.

    Clinton already has Trump squarely in her sights.

    HILLARY CLINTON (D), Democratic Presidential Candidate: I think that anybody running for office should spend as much or more time listening than talking and I know I will be way ahead in that category against Donald Trump, there's no doubt about that.

  • JOHN YANG:

    She spent today campaigning and fundraising in California.

    (END VIDEOTAPE)

  • JOHN YANG:

    People have been waiting for hours in the cold rain in Charleston, waiting for Donald Trump to do what he says working on Hillary Clinton, the beginning of a general election campaign. A lot of the people online say they're excited to see Trump as the nominee for the very first time — Judy.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    So, John, do you sense there is something different in how they see him now that he's the presumptive nominee?

  • JOHN YANG:

    I think there is excitement that he's now the guy, he has now cleared the way to the nomination and that he'll start to take on Hillary Clinton. A lot of the people we talked to said they were very excited to see that.

    A lot of talk here about West Virginia. They hope he can help West Virginia's economy, particularly the coal workers we talked to, who were — expressed some anger at what they heard from Hillary Clinton lately about putting coal workers out of work, Judy.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And, John, what have you learned about how Donald Trump may be shaping a different kind of campaign going into the general election against Secretary Clinton, assuming it is Secretary Clinton?

  • JOHN YANG:

    Well, that's the big question, Judy. These campaign — this campaign has been unlike anything we've ever seen before. Not much television ads. A lot of social media. A lot of free media. Television interviews.

    He only has one event a day, usually late in the day like this one because he's going home every night, commuting to New York and flying out again the next day. The big question is whether this will change in the general election, although some may say you don't tinker with success — Judy.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And, finally, John, we know that Hillary Clinton's opponent Bernie Sanders is also in West Virginia today. Any read on the kind of reception he's getting there?

  • JOHN YANG:

    He's a pretty strong lead in the polls, about 8-point lead in the last pre-primary poll. And what's fueling his campaign are a lot of the same issues and the same forces and the same demographics that is giving Trump a lot of strength here. This is a state of poor white voters, a lot of whom are hurting very much from the economy, a lot of people hurting from the downturn in the coal industry, a lot of those things giving fuel to Sanders' campaign and it's also likely to help him at some of the other states down the road like Kentucky, right down until that big showdown in California.

    So, he's going to be dogging Hillary Clinton every step of the way right to the end — Judy.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    John Yang reporting for us from what will be a Trump campaign event in Charleston, West Virginia — we thank you.

  • JOHN YANG:

    Thanks, Judy.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    We'll take a closer look at how Republicans are dividing over Donald Trump as their nominee a little later in the program.

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