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News Wrap: California to sharply scale back solitary confinement

In our news wrap Tuesday, a new California policy limits the use of solitary confinement to gang members who commit new crimes in prison. Also, a county clerk in Kentucky has refused again to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, even after the Supreme Court rejected her appeal.

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    This was another wild day on Wall Street and markets around the world. The selling started after China reported its industrial activity hit a three-year low last month. The Dow Jones industrial average ultimately lost 470 points to close below 16060. The Nasdaq fell 140 points, and the S&P 500 dropped nearly 60. All three were down about three percent, and the price of oil fell 8 percent after a three-day surge.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In Kentucky, a county clerk refused again today to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, even after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected her appeal. Instead, Kim Davis said she's invoking — quote — "God's authority." In a statement, she declared — quote — "It is not a light issue for me. It is a heaven or hell decision."

    Davis also squared off against same-sex couples who came to her office seeking licenses, and left voicing their frustrations.

  • MAN:

    We thought the injunction would do something, but it's pointless. They have an injunction from a federal judge that is pointless. No one can force her to do her job. She can continue to deny us and treat us like second-class citizens. That's just how it is. There's nothing we can do about it.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    A federal judge has summoned Davis to appear Thursday to face a possible citation for contempt of court.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    California will sharply scale back its use of solitary confinement in prisons in a major victory for inmates who sued over the practice. They argued that isolating gang leaders indefinitely, sometimes for more than 10 years, was cruel and unusual punishment. The new policy limits solitary confinement to gang members who commit new crimes in prison.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The latest batch of Hillary Clinton's e-mails as secretary of state drew scrutiny today. Last night, the State Department released another 7,100 pages from the private computer server that Clinton used in office; 125 held information that's now deemed classified, but wasn't when e-mails were sent.

    State Department spokesman Mark Toner was asked about that today.

  • MARK TONER, State Department Spokesman:

    It's very difficult for us — and I said this before — to go back and to judge what the circumstances were at the time this information was shared and to make a judgment on whether that information was classified at the time. It's not a black-and-white issue. It's not a clear issue.

    We see nothing at this point in time up until now that would indicate that any of this information was even — was marked classified at the time.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The e-mail issue has weighed on Clinton's campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. She now acknowledges it was a mistake to use a private account for official e-mails.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In Thailand, authorities have made another arrest in last month's deadly bombing at a Bangkok shrine. Officials say he resembles the man spotted in surveillance video planting the bomb. The suspect is a foreigner and was detained in Eastern Thailand near the Cambodian border.

    After his arrest, officers displayed his belongings and sent him to Bangkok for questioning.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The drama surrounding the mass migration across Europe of people fleeing violence and poverty in Syria, Libya, and other nations took a new turn to chaos today in Budapest, Hungary.

    James Mates of Independent Television News reports from the scene.

  • JAMES MATES:

    The scene this morning as crowds of migrants, many refugees from war back home tried to crowd onto trains to the Austrian capital, Vienna, and from there to the welcome they have been promised in Germany.

    But anxious to avoid a repeat of yesterday, when the border with Austria became near impassable, the police moved them outside. All trains were canceled, ticket or no ticket.

    Chaotic decision-making across Europe has left these people genuinely in limbo. They don't want to be here. They want move out of Hungary just as quickly as possible. And yet, for the time being at least, they're going nowhere.

    And limbo is not comfortable on a scorching hot day. They could find little shelter, and even the shade was precious. There are as many children as adults here, and no indication at all where they will be spending tonight.

    The underground station beneath the main terminus is perhaps the most likely, packed full today, except when rumors spread that they were to be taken to transit camps. These buses were here to take the refugees away, but none were going.

    It looks like they have brought up some buses here. Are they going to take you somewhere?

  • MAN:

    No, no. They go to the camp.

  • JAMES MATES:

    And will you go?

  • MAN:

    No, of course not.

  • JAMES MATES:

    Hundreds of miles away on Hungary's border with Serbia, the flood of refugees into the European Union continues unabated. Hungary says, from now on, all these people must register for asylum with them. They will do everything to avoid that.

  • MAN:

    We're afraid that we will be caught on the borders by the Hungarian police. We hope that we will pass peacefully, because we don't want stay there.

  • JAMES MATES:

    Europe's supposedly strict rules on borders and refugees now hopelessly inadequate to deal with the sheer numbers of people coming.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Elsewhere, fights broke out at the Greek border with Macedonia, when hundreds of people tried to rush crossing points.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Anti-government protesters in Lebanon briefly occupied the Environment Ministry today in Beirut. It was the latest move in a campaign that started with demands to collect garbage on time.

    Roughly 30 members of the so-called You Stink movement staged a sit-in today. They chanted slogans and called for the minister's removal from office.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The United Nations today confirmed that Islamic State militants in Syria have blown up the 2,000 year-old Temple of Bel. Satellite images show the main structure and a line of columns have been reduced to rubble. It had been one of the best preserved sites in the ancient city of Palmyra.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Back in this country, a Transportation Department panel is calling for airlines to be more up front about fees and seat size. The committee found change and cancellation fees are often hidden. It also expressed concern about the space between seat rows, especially if passengers have to evacuate. It's gone from 34 inches to 31 on most planes.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    It turns out that most people's hearts are older than they are, so to speak. The Centers for Disease Control reports high blood pressure, obesity and other factors can accelerate the organ's aging process.

    The CDC estimates that, on average, American men have hearts that are nearly 8 years older than their actual age. For American women, the age difference is about five-and-a-half years.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And Los Angeles will be the U.S. candidate to host the 2024 Summer Olympics. The United States Olympic Committee announced the decision today, after Boston pulled out of the race. Los Angeles will compete against Paris, Rome, Budapest, and Hamburg, Germany.

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