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News Wrap: 12-year-old with fake gun killed by police in Cleveland

In our news wrap Monday, a police officer shot and killed 12-year-old Tamir Rice near a playground in Cleveland. The boy was carrying a pellet gun that looked like a real gun. Also, two U.S. troops were killed by a bombing in Kabul, a day after the Afghan parliament approved an agreement to keep some American troops in the country after 2014.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Another fatal police shooting, this one in Cleveland, was also in the spotlight today. An officer shot and killed 12-year-old Tamir Rice on Sunday near a playground. He was carrying a pellet gun made to look like a real weapon. Police Chief Calvin Williams says the boy was ordered to raise his hands, but pulled out the pellet gun. He says the officer had to make a split-second decision. CALVIN WILLIAMS, Cleveland Police Chief: He didn't want to do this. He had to protect himself. And as the investigation goes on, other things will come out. We know that the family doesn't — maybe doesn't want to hear that part of it, but the investigation, all the video evidence, the scientific evidence will show everybody exactly what happened.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The chief said a surveillance video captured the shooting and is — quote — "very clear," but he gave no details. A 911 caller had alerted police, and said the boy's gun was — quote — "probably fake," but it's not clear if the officer ever got that word.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In Afghanistan, two U.S. troops died in a bombing attack in Kabul today, the latest in a new surge of violence. It came a day after the Afghan Parliament approved an agreement keeping some U.S. troops there after 2014. Their mission will now include new operations against the Taliban, but the White House said today only with clear limits.

  • JOSH EARNEST, White House Press Secretary:

    Any sort of combat operations that are carried out by U.S. military personnel will be for force protection or to go after remnants of al-Qaida or extremists like al-Qaida that work with al-Qaida that pose a significant threat to the U.S. homeland or to U.S. interests around the globe. And that's the change in the mission that will move forward at the end of the year, consistent with the directives that the president has been discussing for some time now.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    All of this followed the deadliest attack of the year so far, Sunday's suicide bombing at an Afghan volleyball tournament. The death toll from that attack rose to at least 50 today.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Government troops in Iraq recaptured two eastern towns from Islamic State militants today. Fighting was continuing in pockets outside the towns in Diyala Province. Shiite militiamen and Kurdish forces joined in the fight. The two towns had been taken by Islamic State militants back in August, when they tore across Northern and Western Iraq.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Back in this country, there's word that the price of gasoline has hit a four-year low. It fell to an average of $2.84 a gallon in the past week. Gas prices are down 88 cents over the past six months.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    On Wall Street today, the Dow Jones industrial average gained more than seven points to close near 17818. The Nasdaq rose almost 42 points to close near 4755. And the S&P 500 added about six points to finish at 2069.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    President Obama today awarded the nation's highest civilian honor, the Medal of Freedom, to 18 artists, public servants and activists. Three civil rights workers were honored posthumously, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner were murdered by the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi in 1964. Other recipients included singer-songwriter Stevie Wonder, actress Meryl Streep, NBC journalist Tom Brokaw, Congressman John Dingell, who's served longer than anyone ever, and Ethel Kennedy, widow of Senator Robert F. Kennedy.

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