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News Wrap: Attorney General Lynch pledges help to Baltimore

In our news wrap Tuesday, Attorney General Loretta Lynch promised federal help to Baltimore as it considers some re-training for its police force. Lynch visited the city to meet with students, religious and political leaders, as well as the family of Freddie Gray. Also, President Obama nominated Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford Jr. to be the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    President Obama nominated U.S. Marine General Joseph Dunford Jr. to be chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff today. Dunford commanded U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan in 2013 and 2014. And he’s had a meteoric rise through the ranks.

    In the Rose Garden, the president said he’s been extraordinarily impressed.

  • PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA:

    I know Joe. I trust him. He’s already proven his ability to give me his unvarnished military advice based on his experience on the ground. Under his steady hand, we have achieved key milestones, including transition to Afghan responsibility for security, historic Afghan elections, and the drawdown of U.S. forces.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    If confirmed by the Senate, Dunford will be the second Marine to chair the Joint Chiefs.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch promised federal help today to Baltimore, as it considers the training of its police force. Lynch visited the city to meet with students and religious and political leaders. She also met with police officials and with the family of Freddie Gray. His death sparked riots in the city last week. Six police officers have now been charged in the case.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee has entered the Republican presidential race for 2016. He made the announcement today in his hometown of Hope, Arkansas, and played up his economic populism.

  • FORMER GOV. MIKE HUCKABEE, (R) Arkansas:

    Ninety-three million Americans don’t have jobs, and many of them who do have seen their full-time job with benefits they once had become two part-time jobs with no benefits at all.

    We were promised hope, but it was just talk, and now we need the kind of change that really could get America from hope to higher ground.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Huckabee has run for the Republican nomination before, in 2008, with a strong appeal to social conservatives. He’s the sixth candidate to join the GOP field for 2016.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In Nepal, search teams kept digging in a mudslide that buried an entire village in last month’s earthquake. The site is on a popular trekking route. This video, from an American mountain biker, captured the instant the quake struck. A moment later, a torrent of earth crashed down on the trail and the bike. The rider survived, but the quake’s overall death toll has now surpassed 7,500.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The Mediterranean Sea is the site of yet another disaster involving European-bound migrants. The humanitarian group Save the Children reports dozens of people drowned Sunday as their dinghy deflated. That’s based on survivor accounts. The Associated Press obtained video of the rescue. It shows people frantically climbing ropes to a cargo ship. Others grasped for lifesavers.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    For the first time, a U.S. secretary of state has set foot in Somalia. John Kerry today sought to bolster efforts against Al-Shabaab militants who are allied with al-Qaida. Kerry met with Somalia’s president at the heavily guarded Mogadishu Airport, and he invoked Black Hawk Down, when dead American soldiers were dragged through the streets in 1993.

  • JOHN KERRY, Secretary of State:

    As everybody knows, more than 20 years ago, the United States was forced to pull back from this country, and now we’re returning in collaboration with our international community and with high hopes, mixed obviously with ongoing concerns.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Kerry also talked of taking steps toward reopening a U.S. mission in Somalia.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Lawmakers in France today moved toward legalizing broad surveillance of terror suspects. The Lower House of Parliament approved the bill and sent it to the French Senate, over the opposition of civil liberty groups. The bill gained momentum after Islamist militants killed 17 people in Paris in January.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Back in this country, the State Department announced new rewards to track down four top leaders of the Islamic State group. The government will pay, collectively, up to $20 million for information on their whereabouts.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The city of Los Angeles is accusing Wells Fargo Bank of pressing its workers to open unauthorized accounts, and charge customers bogus fees. The Los Angeles Times reports the city has filed a civil suit to stop the practices and impose financial penalties. Wells Fargo blames rogue employees and says they have been disciplined or fired.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And on Wall Street, stocks sank after word that the trade deficit hit a six-year high in March. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 140 points to close back near 17900. The Nasdaq fell 77 points, and the S&P 500 slid 25. Also today, oil closed above $60 a barrel in New York, for the first time since December.

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