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News Wrap: Body of slain SC lawmaker lies in state

In our news wrap Wednesday, public viewing began for the open coffin of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the state senator killed in a church shooting in Charleston, South Carolina. Also, Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley ordered several flags removed from the state capitol grounds, as part of a growing push to rid public spaces of Confederate symbols.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The convicted Boston Marathon bomber, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, apologized publicly today for the first time. Then he was sentenced to die for the 2013 attack that killed three people and wounded more than 260.

    The 21-year-old Tsarnaev spoke in federal court after listening to statements from two dozen survivors and family members. In his own statement, he said — quote — "I'm sorry for the lives that I have taken, for the suffering that I have caused you, for the damage that I have done, irreparable damage."

    We will talk to a reporter who was in the courtroom after the news summary.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Public viewing began in South Carolina today for the Reverend Clementa Pinckney, the state senator killed in last week's shootings in Charleston. The open coffin was displayed inside the statehouse where he served for nearly 20 years. Hundreds of people filed past during the afternoon. President Obama will deliver the eulogy at Pinckney's funeral on Friday in Charleston.

    Charlayne Hunter-Gault speaks with the city's longtime Mayor Joseph Riley later in the program.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Meanwhile, the governor of Alabama has joined the push to rid public spaces of Confederate symbols. Republican Robert Bentley ordered several flags removed today from the state capitol grounds. He called them a distraction.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The government of France expressed outrage today after new revelations of U.S. eavesdropping. Documents released by WikiLeaks showed the National Security Agency spied on the last three French presidents and other officials from 2006 to 2012.

    Prime Minister Manuel Valls, addressing the National Assembly, said France will not tolerate such actions.

    MANUEL VALLS, French Prime Minister (through interpretor): These types of practices are a very serious violation of the spirit of trust we must have. The United States must admit not only the danger that such acts have on our freedoms, but also they must do everything to repair the damages it created in the relationship between allied countries and between the United States and France.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    French President Francois Hollande called the spying unacceptable, and he said President Obama promised in a phone call to end it.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Iran's supreme leader is taking a tougher line on nuclear negotiations with a deadline just days away. In Tehran last night, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei rejected a freeze on nuclear research, as well as access to military sites. State TV also showed Khamenei telling senior leaders that economic sanctions must be lifted immediately.

    AYATOLLAH ALI KHAMENEI, Supreme Leader of Iran (through interpretor): The Americans have offered a complicated, multilayered and odd formula for the lifting of sanctions, and it is not clear how it would work. The lifting of sanctions cannot depend on the implementation of Iran's obligations. America's goal is to uproot and destroy the country's nuclear industry.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The U.S. wants sanctions lifted gradually, and says inspections must be part of any agreement.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    A Dutch court ruled today that the Netherlands must cut greenhouse gas emissions. The climate ruling ordered reductions of at least 25 percent below 1990 levels by 2020. Environmental activists said the case lays the legal groundwork for similar action in other countries.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In Pakistan, the death toll from blistering heat climbed to nearly 840, even as rain and cooler breezes brought relief. Fewer people were admitted to hospitals in Karachi, after a spike in heat strokes since Sunday. Meanwhile, disaster officials conceded the heat caught them off guard.

  • NAZAR MOHAMMAD BOZDAR, National Disaster Management Authority:

    The climate of Karachi is tropical. It's — people have never expected that such sort of heat would come. And so they were not prepared for that. So that's why there was a jump, there was a surge during these last three, four days.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    This week's sweltering temperatures were made worse by frequent power outages and a lack of clean water.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Back in this country, a 13th candidate has joined the Republican presidential field. Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal kicked off his campaign late today with a rally just outside New Orleans.

    GOV. BOBBY JINDAL (R-LA), Presidential Candidate: My approach is different from most of the other people running for president. The United States of America was made great by people who get things done, not lots of talk or entertaining speeches. Oh, to be sure, there are a lot of great talkers running for president already. But none of them, not one can match our record of actually shrinking the size of government.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Jindal is in his second term as governor, but his approval rating has dropped sharply in the face of a state budget shortfall.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Wall Street had a rough day, amid new worries about a Greek bailout deal. The Dow Jones industrial average lost nearly 180 points to close below 18000. The Nasdaq fell almost 40 points and the S&P 500 slipped 15.

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