News Wrap: Burkina Faso declares state of emergency

In our news wrap Thursday, protesters in Burkina Faso stormed the parliament and set it on fire to protest the rule of its president, who has been in power for 27 years. Also, the U.S. economy continued to make solid growth in the third quarter.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The U.S. economy has turned in another solid quarter. Growth from July through September ran at an annual rate of 3.5 percent. That follows an even stronger second quarter. And falling gas prices are expected to help keep the trend going through the rest of the year. We will look at how the economy is affecting the midterm elections later in the program.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    On Wall Street, that upbeat growth report and strong corporate earnings pushed stocks higher again. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 221 points to close 17195; the Nasdaq rose nearly 17 points to close at 4566; and the S&P added 12 to close at 1994.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    A nurse from Maine who's returned from West Africa's Ebola zone defied a voluntary quarantine today. Kaci Hickox took a bicycle ride with her boyfriend in Fort Kent, Maine. She'd returned there Monday after spending three days in forced isolation in New Jersey. She's said she's free of symptoms.

    Maine officials are pursuing a court order to keep Hickox at home until the incubation period for the virus ends.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    There are new warnings about the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone. The new head of the country's response center said today the crisis is getting worse and that efforts to fight the disease are three months behind. That's one day after officials reported the rate of infection in neighboring Liberia appears to be slowing.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    A different crisis gripped another West African nation today. The president of Burkina Faso, who's ruled for 27 seven years, agreed to drop his bid for another term after protesters stormed Parliament. They set the building on fire, and from there thousands moved on to attack the homes of government ministers. The president declared a state of emergency and dropped out of sight.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Fighting has flared again in Ukraine, despite a cease-fire. The country's military says seven of its soldiers were killed in the last 24 hours in the eastern part of the country. That's the most in two weeks. Government troops and pro-Russian rebels have clashed repeatedly since September 5, when the truce was signed.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Back in this country, the Education Department announced a new rule governing for-profit colleges whose students can't find jobs that let them pay off their federal loans. They will have to show that a graduate's estimated annual loan payment doesn't exceed 8 percent of total earnings. The effort targets career schools that soak up tuition, but provide little useful training.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The mayor who led Boston through the Boston Marathon bombings, Thomas Menino, died today after battling cancer. Menino was hailed for uniting the city after the bomb attack killed three people and wounded more than 260 in April 2013.

  • FORMER MAYOR THOMAS MENINO, Boston:

    There's going to be a lot of help needed for them, but we will be there for them, because that's what Boston is all about. We're one city committed to making a better city for all the people not to forget as you go further down the road.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Menino retired this year after serving more than 20 years as mayor, the most in the city's history. He was 71 years old.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The acclaimed poet Galway Kinnell was remembered today for his long award-winning career. He died Tuesday of leukemia at 87. Kinnell first gained notice in the early 1960s and continued publishing for decades. Along the way, he won a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award for such works as "Body Rags" and "Mortal Acts, Mortal Words."

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