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News Wrap: Capitol Police wound man who pulled gun

In our news wrap Monday, a man going through security at the U.S. Capitol visitors’ center Monday pulled a gun on police officers, who shot and wounded him before taking him into custody. Also, the governor of Georgia vetoed a bill that would allow religious groups to deny services to LGBT people.

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    Good evening. I'm Gwen Ifill.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And I'm Judy Woodruff.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    On the "NewsHour" tonight: The Pakistani government announces a crackdown after an Easter massacre targeting Christians leaves 70 dead and hundreds wounded.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Also ahead: Bernie Sanders sweeps the weekend's primaries by huge margins in Alaska, Washington, and Hawaii. We get analysis on that and other campaign news from our Politics Monday duo.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Plus, a report from the front lines against ISIS, where Iraqi troops are beginning an offensive to take back the city of Mosul.

  • JANE FERGUSON:

    Civilians are running from their homes where the fresh fighting has broken out. These people came from the villages recently retaken from ISIS, seizing the chance to escape the fighting.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    All that and more on tonight's "PBS NewsHour."

    (BREAK)

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Shooting erupted inside the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center this afternoon. Police say a man was going through security screening when he pulled a gun and pointed it at officers. They shot and wounded him and took him into custody. A female bystander was injured, but not seriously.

    The Capitol police chief said it appears to be an isolated incident.

  • MATTHEW VERDEROSA, Police Chief, U.S. Capitol:

    I want to stress that, while this is preliminary, based on the initial investigation, we believe that this is an act of a single person who has frequented the Capitol grounds before, and there is no reason to believe that this is anything more than a criminal act.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The shooting prompted the entire U.S. Capitol complex and nearby White House to go on lockdown for a time. Congress is currently in recess, so most lawmakers were traveling or back home in their districts.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The governor of Georgia today vetoed a bill to let religious groups deny services to homosexual, bisexual and transgender people. Republican Nathan Deal said there's no need to discriminate in order to protect religious liberties.

    Meanwhile, in North Carolina, gay and transgender groups filed suit against a new state ban on local laws providing for transgender bathrooms and other protections.

  • WOMAN:

    This is not about a bathroom, this is not about a cake, and this is not about flowers at a wedding. This is about discrimination. This is about being afraid of where this world has gone and where we will continue to go.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Republican Governor Pat McCrory signed the ban into law last week. It overturned a Charlotte ordinance allowing transgender people to use the bathroom that matches their identity.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In Belgium, the death toll rose to 35 in last week's terror attacks in Brussels. And police called for the public to help identify a key suspect.

    Emma Murphy of Independent Television News reports from Brussels.

  • EMMA MURPHY:

    The man in the hat, believed to be the surviving bomber from the Brussels Airport attack, who he is and where he is still unknown.

    Today, Belgian authorities released this video of him walking through the airport with the other two attackers. Moments later, they blew themselves up. But when his bomb failed to detonate, he fled. Police are now appealing for those who may know the most wanted man to get in touch.

    As that footage was released, prosecutors confirmed that more people had died in the attacks than first thought.

  • WOMAN:

    Well, we know now that four people have died in a hospital after the attack and that 31 died in the crime scene; 28 of these 31 people were identified formally. And we are still trying to give the three families of the three victims news about their relatives.

  • EMMA MURPHY:

    People have today charged three more people following days of raids, Yassine A., Mohamed B. and Aboubaker O. all accused of participating in terrorist activities.

    Meanwhile, a man arrested at this apartment and named as Faycal C. when he was charged with terrorist offenses has been released, police saying they didn't have enough evidence to hold him.

    Almost a week after Najim Laachraoui and Ibrahim El Bakraoui attacked airport, the memorial to those they killed remained outside. There is a wish to get this place open again soon, but with additional security. Tomorrow, 800 airport staff will be asked to check in as if they were passengers in order to test the efficiency of the new systems.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    This evening, an all-faith service was held at the Brussels Cathedral in tribute to the victims of the attacks.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And in Syria, government forces began combing Palmyra for mines and bombs left by Islamic State militants. The army captured the ancient city yesterday, clearing the way to advance toward militant strongholds in the east.

    But during their 10-month occupation, ISIS fighters destroyed some of its most revered treasures. they include temples dating back more than 1,800 years.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Former Cuban leader Fidel Castro spoke out today on President Obama's historic visit, and rejected his appeal for warmer ties. In a long letter to state media, Castro catalogued U.S. actions against his regime, and he dismissed Mr. Obama's call to — quote — "leave the past behind."

    But, in Washington, White House spokesman Josh Earnest brushed aside the Castro criticism.

  • JOSH EARNEST, White House Press Secretary:

    The fact that the former president felt compelled to respond so forcefully to the president's visit, I think, is an indication of the significant impact of President Obama's visit to Cuba.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Mr. Obama didn't meet with Fidel Castro last week. He did have several meetings with his younger brother, Raul Castro, who is Cuba's current president.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Chicago's police got a new interim boss today, in the face of a federal investigation over the use of deadly force. Veteran Officer Eddie Johnson was appointed by Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Johnson's predecessor was forced out last fall over the killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by a white officer.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    California Governor Jerry Brown has formally unveiled a plan to raise the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour. Brown says it's a landmark deal to increase the current minimum from $10 an hour, in stages, by 2022. If approved by the state legislature, it will be the highest statewide rate in the country.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    There is word the Justice Department will end its encryption fight with Apple. It's widely reported the department is dropping the legal effort to make the company unlock an iPhone. It was used by one of the San Bernardino, California, shooters. The Associated Press says the FBI used another method to decrypt the phone's data.

    Wall Street had a quiet Easter Monday. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 19 points to close at 17535. The Nasdaq dropped six points. The S&P 500 added one.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And the President and Mrs. Obama hosted their final White House Easter egg roll today. Thousands of children turned out to take part in a tradition that goes back to 1878. The president also read the children's classic "Where the Wild Things Are." And there was basketball, tennis and a run hosted by the first lady.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Still to come on the "NewsHour": the group and the motives behind the deadly Easter Sunday bombing in Pakistan; a fight to push back ISIS in Northern Iraq; our Politics Monday team on the week ahead on the campaign trail; and much more.

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