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News Wrap: GOP will be absent from Calif. Senate race; Eritrean migrant smuggler arrested

In our news wrap Wednesday, no Republican earned enough primary votes to qualify for California’s Senate race, meaning that for the first time in Golden State history, two Democrats will face one another in a November runoff. Also, Italian authorities took custody of an alleged migrant-smuggling kingpin, who was arrested in Sudan and extradited to Rome to face charges.

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    Good evening. I’m Gwen Ifill.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And I’m Judy Woodruff.

  • On the “NewsHour” tonight:

  • HILLARY CLINTON (D), Presumptive Presidential Nominee:

    Oh, I think he represents a great threat to our society and our economy.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    I sit down with the new presumptive nominee, Hillary Clinton, to talk about facing Donald Trump head on and what lies ahead.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Plus, we examine Hillary Clinton’s achievement and the possibility of a woman president, as Republicans express continued concern about Donald Trump.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Also ahead this Wednesday: inside Nepal’s kilns. Children workers are making bricks to rebuild the country’s earthquake-stricken towns.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And preventing fires in space, a look at how scientists are keeping spacecrafts safe from micro-gravity fires.

  • JERRY LINENGER, Former NASA Astronaut:

    Fourteen minutes is a long time with a roaring fire and a blackout from the smoke, and no place to go. And if it were any bigger, I’m pretty darn sure we would have lost that spacecraft.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    All that and more on tonight’s “PBS NewsHour.”

    (BREAK)

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Hillary Clinton celebrated today after clinching the Democratic presidential nomination and winning four of six primaries on Tuesday. Bernie Sanders insisted he’s not dropping out, even as he plans to meet tomorrow with President Obama.

    And Republican Donald Trump appealed to Democrats, even as he feuded with GOP leaders.

    All three spoke to their supporters last night.

  • HILLARY CLINTON:

    Now, I know it never feels good to put your heart into a cause or a candidate you believe in, and to come up short. I know that feeling well.

    (LAUGHTER)

    (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • HILLARY CLINTON:

    But, as we look ahead — as we look ahead to the battle that awaits, let’s remember all that unites us.

  • SEN. BERNIE SANDERS, Democratic Presidential Candidate:

    I know that the fight in front of us is a very, very steep fight. But we will continue to fight for every vote and every delegate we can get.

    (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • DONALD TRUMP (R), Presumptive Presidential Nominee:

    To all of those Bernie Sanders voters who have been left out in the cold by a rigged system of superdelegates, we welcome you with open arms.

    (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And we will have our interview with Hillary Clinton right after the news summary.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In the day’s other news: For the first time, there won’t be a Republican in California’s U.S. Senate race. The top two vote-getters advanced Tuesday, and both were Democrats, state Attorney General Kamala Harris, by a wide margin, and Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez, a 10-term veteran.

    Meanwhile, Representative Renee Ellmers of North Carolina was ousted by another Republican in a redrawn district. She’d been endorsed by Donald Trump.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In Israel, two Palestinian gunmen killed at least three people and wounded five in Tel Aviv. Police said the attackers were detained. The location was a popular open-air market. It is the latest in eight months of Palestinian attacks, most of them involving stabbings.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    For the first time, Italy has custody of an alleged kingpin in the smuggling of thousands of migrants from Libya. The suspect from Eritrea was arrested in Sudan two weeks ago. He was flown to Rome overnight. Officials say intercepted calls show him talking about cramming more people on rickety boats.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    India’s leader went before Congress today to declare solidarity with the United States.

    William Brangham has our report.

  • MAN:

    The prime minister of the republic of India.

  • WILLIAM BRANGHAM:

    It was a rousing welcome today for Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

  • NARENDRA MODI, Indian Prime Minister:

    The constraints of the past are behind us, and foundations of the future are firmly in place.

  • WILLIAM BRANGHAM:

    Of course, things were not always so friendly. For decades, the U.S. and India were divided by mistrust and Cold War politics.

    And Modi himself was refused entry to the U.S. in 2005, after religious riots killed more than 1,000 Muslims in the state he governed. But since becoming prime minister in 2014, he’s worked to foster new cooperation with Washington.

    Sumit Ganguly is a professor of political science at Indiana University in Bloomington.

  • SUMIT GANGULY, Indiana University:

    Unlike a host of other Indian prime ministers who had cut their political teeth during the Cold War, and thereby harbored all manner of misgivings about the United States, Modi doesn’t carry the same sort of political baggage.

  • WILLIAM BRANGHAM:

    The two countries share growing concerns about China’s assertiveness in the Asia-Pacific. Climate change could be another area of agreement. Modi suggested yesterday that India, the third largest emitter of carbon, could join last year’s Paris climate pact by the end of this year.

  • NARENDRA MODI:

    To take from nature only what is most essential is a part of our Indian culture.

  • WILLIAM BRANGHAM:

    Still, serious differences remain. Human rights groups say Modi has failed to stop indentured servitude and sex trafficking, as well as protect India’s minorities.

  • SUMIT GANGULY:

    This is where I think he as fallen short and he does really need to wake up.

  • WILLIAM BRANGHAM:

    But such concerns have clearly been pushed to the background, as Washington and New Delhi move closer together than ever.

    For the “PBS NewsHour,” I’m William Brangham.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    There has been another incident between the U.S. and China in the East China Sea. The U.S. military says a Chinese fighter jet flew too close and too fast to an American reconnaissance plane yesterday. But Beijing said the U.S. is to blame.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And on Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average gained 66 points to close at 18500. The Nasdaq rose nearly 13, and the S&P 500 added seven.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Still to come on the “NewsHour”: an interview with Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee; what to expect as candidates move full-speed ahead into the general election; child labor rebuilding an earthquake-struck Nepal; and much more.

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