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News Wrap: Islamic State group claims it took U.S. air-dropped weapons

Islamic State fighters in Syria have reportedly taken weapons air-dropped by the U.S. for Kurdish fighters in Kobani. Meanwhile, in Baghdad, a series of bombings left 30 people dead in Shiite districts. In Hong Kong, student leaders sat down with local government officials, but the student-led pro-democracy demonstrations have not come to an end.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    From now on, people flying to the U.S. from three West African countries will have to enter through one of five airports to be screened for Ebola.

    The announcement today named the five as New York's JFK International, Newark Liberty, Washington Dulles, Chicago O'Hare, and Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson. The White House is under political pressure for an outright ban on travel from West Africa, but spokesman Josh Earnest again dismissed that option.

  • JOSH EARNEST, White House Press Secretary:

    A travel ban would only serve to put the American people at greater risk. The reason for that is simply, if you institute a travel ban, that individuals who have spent time in West Africa would essentially go underground. They would seek to evade detection. They would conceal the true nature of their travel history in an attempt to enter the country.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Last night, the Centers for Disease Control released new Ebola guidelines for health care workers. Today, the CDC staged a mass training exercise in New York City. We will speak with the head of the agency right after the news summary.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    An American detained in North Korea for nearly six months has been released and is on his way home. Jeffrey Fowle of Miamisburg, Ohio, had been charged with leaving a Bible at a nightclub. The State Department said today that Sweden negotiated his freedom. Americans Matthew Miller and Kenneth Bae are still being held for convictions ranging from hostile acts to espionage.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Islamic State fighters in Syria are claiming they seized weapons airdropped by the U.S. yesterday. The guns and ammunition were meant for Kurds defending the town of Kobani. Video posted online showed militants looking through crates of rocket-propelled grenades and other arms. They also posted sarcastic thank you notes.

    At the Pentagon, Rear Admiral John Kirby acknowledged a least one load went astray. But he said the overall air campaign is helping.

  • REAR ADM. JOHN KIRBY, Pentagon Press Secretary:

    What I can tell you is that the constant pressure from the air and — and it's not insignificant — the pressure from the ground by these Kurdish forces has done a lot to keep ISIL at bay from — from taking the whole town.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Kirby also said the campaign against Islamic State forces has cost $424 million since August.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    There was no let-up today in the barrage of bombings in Iraq. A series of attacks in or near Baghdad killed at least 30 people in Shiite districts. The targets were restaurants and markets, and the force of the explosions blew buildings and storefronts to shreds. Charred, mangled cars littered the streets afterward.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In Afghanistan, the opium poppy crop hit a new record last year. That's despite U.S. counternarcotics efforts that cost $7.6 billion over the past decade. A federal audit reported today that the Afghan crop netted nearly $3 billion in profit, up from $2 billion in 2012.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Student leaders in Hong Kong held talks with government officials today, but made little progress toward ending a standoff. The meeting came as Hong Kong's chief executive refused again to let the public nominate candidates for elections in 2017.

    He did talk of a public role in choosing the nominating committee, but that didn't satisfy protesters.

    ALEX CHOW, Secretary-General, Hong Kong Federation of Students (through interpreter): You have just mentioned some solutions, but is there a timetable or road map to show the people of Hong Kong and add their voice to the issue of political reform? I believe most Hong Kong people still cannot get an answer to this.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Demonstrators have tied up key sections of Hong Kong for several weeks.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    South African Paralympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius was sentenced today to five years in prison for shooting his girlfriend to death. He'd been found guilty of negligent homicide. Pistorius left the court in Pretoria and was driven away to begin serving his sentence. The double amputee will be confined in a prison hospital wing. He could be released to house arrest after just 10 months.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Back in this country, a House committee announced it wants answers about potentially faulty air bags in five million recalled vehicles. The devices were made by Takata Corporation of Japan, and can spray metal shards in a crash. Yesterday, the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration warned owners to get the air bags fixed right away. But automakers say they're still waiting for parts.

    You can see a list of the recalled vehicles on our Web site.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Wall Street had another good day, thanks partly to upbeat earnings reports. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 215 points to close well above 16,614. The Nasdaq rose 103 points to close at 4,419. And the S&P 500 added 37 to finish at 1,941.

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