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News Wrap: Lynch urges end to cop-community divide, ceasefire takes hold in South Sudan

In our news wrap Tuesday, Attorney General Loretta Lynch, testifying at a House hearing, said stopping violence must be a rallying point for both police and minority groups. She also defended the decision not to charge Hillary Clinton in the email scandal but refused to further discuss the investigation. Also, a ceasefire took hold in South Sudan, where 272 were killed in five days of fighting.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Good evening. I'm Judy Woodruff.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And I'm Gwen Ifill.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    On the "NewsHour" tonight:

  • FORMER PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH:

    These slain officers were the best among us.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Addressing a divided nation, former President George W. Bush and President Obama honor the five officers who died in last week's ambush in Dallas.

  • PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA:

    The deepest fault lines of our democracy have suddenly been exposed, perhaps even widened.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Also ahead this Tuesday:

    SEN. BERNIE SANDERS, (I), Vermont: I have come here to make it as clear as possible as to why I am endorsing Hillary Clinton.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Bernie Sanders throws his support behind the presumptive Democratic nominee.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And continuing our series The End of AIDS, we go to the South, America's epicenter of the outbreak, where a hard-hit population is facing significant barriers to care.

    DR. MELANIE THOMPSON, Fulton County Task Force on HIV/AIDS: Many of my friends ask me, you know, why are you working in Atlanta? Everybody works internationally. And I feel like we have a Third World epidemic, in some ways, here.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    All that and more on tonight's "PBS NewsHour."

    (BREAK)

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Attorney General Loretta Lynch urged Americans today to bridge the divide between police and the communities they serve.

    She spoke as the president attended a service in Dallas for five officers killed by a sniper. Lynch testified at a House hearing, and said stopping violence must be a rallying point for both police and minority groups.

  • LORETTA LYNCH, U.S. Attorney General:

    It is my hope that, as we all look at these tragic incidents, that we will take the opportunity to draw closer to each other, to have the difficult conversations about race and policing in this country, involving all sides, involving all issues and all points of view.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Lynch also faced a battery of Republican questions about the investigation into Hillary Clinton's e-mail use. She defended the decision not to charge Clinton, but refused to discuss details of the investigation.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Hillary Clinton finally got the endorsement today that she's been waiting for from primary season rival Bernie Sanders. The Vermont senator appeared with Clinton in New Hampshire and promised to help defeat Republican Donald Trump in November. We will hear what each had to say, and look at what today's moves mean for the Democratic Party, later in the program.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In South Sudan, the capital city of Juba was quiet after a cease-fire took hold. At least 272 people had been killed in five days of fighting between rival factions. Meanwhile, the United Nations reported at least 36,000 people are seeking shelter at U.N. sites and other locations. And embassies and aid groups began evacuating staffers.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    At least 22 people were killed in southern Italy today when two commuter trains collided head-on at high speed. It happened on a single-track line between two towns in the region of Puglia. Rescue workers searched through mangled wreckage, looking for survivors and dozens of injured.

    And the Italian prime minister interrupted a trip to Milan.

  • MATTEO RENZI, Prime Minister, Italy (through translator):

    After this very brief greeting to you, I will go back straight to Rome because of the train crash. And I have ordered an immediate investigation into what happened. I think absolute clarity must be made on this. We will not stop until we understand what happened.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Officials said they won't be sure of the final death toll until a giant crane can pull the wreckage apart.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Back in this country, House Republican leaders confirmed there will not be a vote on gun control legislation until after the summer recess. Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said it will wait until they return in September.

    Party leaders have been unable to round up enough votes for their bill to ban people on the terror watch list from buying guns.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And a big day on Wall Street: The Dow Jones industrial average reached a record high, gaining 120 points to close at 18347. The Nasdaq rose 34 points and the S&P 500 was up 15, adding to its record close yesterday.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Still to come on the "NewsHour": President Obama's call for healing at a Dallas police memorial; will Bernie Sanders supporters follow his lead; China doubles down on its claims in the South China Sea; and much more.

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