What do you think? Leave a respectful comment.

News Wrap: NC voter ID law opponents vow to fight court decision

In our news wrap Tuesday, opponents said they’d keep up a fight against a law that requires North Carolina voters to show a photo ID after a federal judge upheld it on Monday. Also, officials warned of a major storm system threatening the Great Plains with giant hail and tornadoes.

Read the Full Transcript

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Good evening. I'm Judy Woodruff.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    And I'm Hari Sreenivasan.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    On the "NewsHour" tonight: Voters in five Eastern states hit the polls today. What's at stake as candidates fight for some of the largest delegate hauls left in the race?

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    Also ahead this Tuesday: Today marks 30 years since the worst nuclear disaster in history — a look at how Chernobyl's effects can still be seen.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And how Chicago artist Theaster Gates is breathing new life into the city's South Side by transforming crumbling buildings into spaces for creativity.

  • THEASTER GATES, Artist:

    Poor people have a right to beautiful things, but people have the right not to be poor anymore. I think that feels like it's worth making art about and fighting for.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    All that and more on tonight's "PBS NewsHour."

    (BREAK)

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Five more states, five more wins, that's what Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are looking for in this latest Super Tuesday of the 2016 presidential race.

    Voters turned out today in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. The front-runners hope to run up big margins and big delegate numbers.

    Republican Trump went into the day with 845 delegates. It takes 1,237 to win the party's nomination. On the Democratic side, Clinton already has 1,946 delegates. She needs 2,383 to be nominated. Even with a good night, and a delegate sweep, Trump could still face a contested GOP convention. Clinton aims to make a Democratic victory all but inevitable tonight.

    We will take an extended look at what's at stake tonight after the news summary.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    In the day's other news: Opponents of North Carolina's voter I.D. law said they will keep up their court fight against it. The statute requires voters to show a photo I.D. A federal judge upheld it on Monday, saying the state has a legitimate interest in trying to prevent voter fraud. Opponents argue the law targets minorities.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    A major storm system is sweeping through the Great Plains states this evening, putting some 50 million people at risk. Tornado watches are up for parts of Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas.

    Earlier, high winds, rain, and lightning whipped across Kansas City, and pebble-sized hail pelted airliners at the city's airport.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    In Iraq, Parliament approved a partial reshuffling of the cabinet, under pressure to adopt reforms. Before the vote, shouting matches broke out on the Parliament floor. And that came as thousands of followers of an influential Shiite cleric protested in Baghdad, demanding an end to corruption.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Thousands of so-called junior doctors in England walked off the job today in a contract dispute, leaving senior counterparts to fill in. The all-out strike by the British Medical Association was the first ever against the national health service.

    Victoria Macdonald of Independent Television News reports.

  • VICTORIA MACDONALD:

    On any other day, the ambulance would be bringing its patients back to the junior doctors. Instead, they were here on the picket line again, this time, all emergency coverage withdrawn.

  • DR. YEZEN SHEENA, Junior Doctor:

    Each one of these doctors has had to think really long and hard about taking this position. Unfortunately, the majority of us have realized that we have got no option left.

  • VICTORIA MACDONALD:

    Emergency coverage was, of course, provided in hospitals, but by other staff, including consultants.

    Despite the fact this all-out strike is unprecedented, all the planning does seem to have paid off. Hospitals have coped just fine.

    But the question is, what next? Apart from tomorrow's action, the BMA doesn't have anything else planned, and the health secretary, well, he is showing no signs of backing down.

  • JEREMY HUNT, Health Minister:

    The total refusal of the BMA to negotiate on a perfectly straightforward matter of weekend pay and antisocial hours pay is, I think, sadly driven by some elements, not the majority, but some elements within the BMA who are looking at this as a political battle with the government.

    They have been briefing the media over the last 24 hours that the BMA wants nothing more than to bring down the government. Completely ridiculous.

  • VICTORIA MACDONALD:

    In the meantime, 125,000 operations and outpatient appointments have been postponed or canceled over the two days of the strike. And yet there is still no signs that either side will blink first.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The contract dispute involves plans to expand care on weekends.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    In economic news, Apple reported its revenue fell in the first quarter for the first time in 13 years. The company was hurt by falling sales of iPhones. And Wall Street had a quiet day.

    The Dow Jones industrial average gained 13 points to close at 17990. The Nasdaq fell seven points, and the S&P 500 added close to four.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And the Olympic Flame visited a refugee camp in Athens, Greece, today, carried by a Syrian swimmer who's been granted asylum there. Ibrahim Al-Hussein lost part of his leg in a bombing. He carried the flame through a camp that holds around 1,500 people. He hopes to compete with the Greek team at the Summer Games in Brazil.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    Still to come on the "NewsHour": how today's elections will shape the final leg of the presidential primary; Chernobyl's impact 30 years later; practical advice on preparing for life after college; and much more.

Listen to this Segment

The Latest