News Wrap: Pakistan holds 200 Lahore bombing suspects after rounding up thousands

In our news wrap Tuesday, Pakistani authorities reported that they are holding more than 200 suspects in the wake of Sunday’s suicide attack against Christians in Lahore. Also, the State Department and Pentagon ordered families of U.S. diplomats and military personnel to leave parts of Turkey, citing ongoing security concerns.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Good evening. I'm Judy Woodruff.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And I'm Gwen Ifill.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    On the "NewsHour" tonight: Presidential candidates set their sights on Wisconsin. Ted Cruz gets a critical endorsement, while Bernie Sanders aims to continue his winning streak.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Also ahead this Tuesday: Iraqi Christians flee in staggering numbers, as ISIS' grip tightens, but a small militia group is planning to fight back.

  • SAFAA KHAMRO, Commander, Nineveh Plains Forces (through interpreter):

    Now we have only one unit. We need the help of the Kurds. We have to increase our numbers. If we have enough forces, we can protect the Christians in this Nineveh area.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And from group homes to dorm rooms: how one foster care student beats the odds and wants to help others do the same.

  • JAMES TURNER, Former Foster Youth:

    These kids will be driven because they want to make a name for themselves. You know, foster care and the group homes and foster homes are gold mines for our nation.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    All that and more on tonight's "PBS NewsHour."

    (BREAK)

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In the day's other news: U.S. officials ordered families of American diplomats and military personnel to leave parts of Turkey. The order covers the U.S. Consulate in Adana, plus Incirlik Air Base, and two military sites in Western cities.

    In Washington, Pentagon spokesman Peter Cook cited ongoing security concerns, without giving details.

  • PETER COOK, Pentagon Spokesman:

    This was a decision made out of an abundance of caution, given the overall picture, the security threats that — that we looked at in the region. There's no specific threat that triggered this, but a broader decision based on what we have seen in the region.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Officials also restricted official travel in Turkey, and updated an existing warning on travel in general.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In Pakistan, authorities report they're holding more than 200 suspects in the wake of Sunday's suicide bombing in Lahore. They say they rounded up, and then released, 5,000 others. A Taliban faction claimed responsibility for the attack aimed at Christians celebrating Easter.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    An Egyptian man hijacked a jetliner on a domestic flight today and forced it to fly to Cyprus. Over the next hours, he let most of the passengers go, and then finally gave himself up.

    Diana Magnay of Independent Television News has our report.

  • DIANA MAGNAY:

    EgyptAir Flight 181, eight hostages left on board eight hours into this crisis. Three men raced down the steps, and Cypriot security forces run toward the plane.

    Then this remarkable image: One man scrambles from the cockpit window and swings down the side of the aircraft in what looks like a practiced move. Then, moments later, it's over. The man thought to be the hijacker stumbles almost as he leaves the plane, then walks very casually towards waiting security forces.

    He's been named as Egyptian national Seif Eldin Mustafa, pictured here in a bizarre selfie with a British passenger thought to be from Aberdeen. In this photo, the belt he claimed was packed with explosives is on clear display. It was later found to be fake, just a collection of mobile phone covers.

    And Cyprus' president didn't seem too worried either, making light of earlier media reports that the hijacker had asked to see his Cypriot ex-wife. "Isn't everything always about a woman?" he replied.

    But that this man could make it through security and divert a major airliner without even a weapon is clearly no laughing matter, particularly not for Egypt five months after the downing of the Russian flight in Sinai, with major concerns over airport security still overshadowing its tourism industry.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Egyptian authorities said eight Americans were among the foreigners on board the flight.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The United Nations Children's Agency warned today that more than 300,000 children in Yemen face malnutrition and famine. UNICEF also said all sides in the year-old war have forced children to fight as soldiers. And it said millions of Yemenis lack access to water and health care.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Back in this country, the White House announced a new effort to stop the epidemic of addiction to opioid painkillers and heroin. President Obama attended a summit on the problem in Atlanta. He said he wants to double the number of addicts who get medication for their problem.

  • PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA:

    The most important thing we can do is to reduce demand for drugs. And the only way that we reduce demand is if we're providing treatment and thinking about this as a public health problem, and not just a criminal problem.

    (APPLAUSE)

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Also today, 60 medical schools announced greater focus on limiting the use of opioid painkillers.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    There's a new twist in the battle over a transgender law in North Carolina which bars local governments from allowing transgender bathrooms and other accommodations.

    State Attorney General Roy Cooper, a Democrat, announced today he won't defend the statute in court. He called it a national embarrassment. Republican Governor Pat McCrory signed the law last week.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Illinois Republican Mark Kirk met today with Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland, the first GOP senator to do so. He praised the judge and criticized colleagues who've refused to meet with him or to hold confirmation hearings.

    SEN. MARK KIRK (R), Illinois: I think when you just say I'm not going to meet him at all, that's too closed-minded. We need for rational, adult, open-minded consideration of the constitutional process, which Judge Garland is a part of.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Kirk is facing a tough Senate reelection fight in a Democratic-leaning state.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    On Wall Street, stocks rallied after Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen reaffirmed a go-slow approach on interest rates. The Dow Jones industrial average gained more than 97 points to close at 17633. The Nasdaq rose nearly 80 points, and the S&P 500 added 18.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And actress Patty Duke died today of an intestinal infection. As a teenager, Duke won an Oscar as Helen Keller in the 1962 film "The Miracle Worker." And in the mid-1960s, she played identical twins in "The Patty Duke Show" on TV. Later, she became an advocate for mental health. Patty Duke was 69 years old.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Still to come on the "NewsHour": the Supreme Court's first major split decision since Justice Scalia's death; the DOJ cracks an iPhone and reignites privacy concerns; facing ISIS, Iraqi Christians must decide to flee or fight; and much more.

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