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News Wrap: Police search for motive in Louisiana movie theater shooting

In Friday’s news wrap, a shooting in a Louisiana movie theater has left two dead and nine others injured. Also, Turkish fighter jets have begun bombing Islamic State targets, and the Pentagon announced that U.S. airstrike in Afghanistan has killed a senior Al-Qaeda operational commander.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Police are searching for a motive, after last night's shooting at a Louisiana movie theater.

    Authorities say 59-year-old John Russel Houser killed two and injured nine others, before killing himself. Court documents from years ago showed Houser was mentally ill and prone to violence, to the extent he was hospitalized against his will and his wife hid his guns. We will have more on the shooting, plus a broader look at gun violence in America, after the news summary.

    Turkish fighter jets bombed Islamic State targets in Syria today, in retaliation for an ISIS attack on a Turkish military outpost yesterday. It's the first time the country's military has engaged in direct combat with the militants. Turkish forces also stepped up patrols along the Syrian border. And police detained nearly 300 people they labeled extremist across the country in early morning raids.

    Turkey's president said the escalation is necessary.

    PRESIDENT RECEP TAYYIP ERDOGAN, Turky (through interpreter): Our state and government will take needed action against any attack no matter what it is. It is not only for last night. We will take the necessary precautions for our nation's security and peace. Last night was the start of this, and we will keep going on the same way.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The U.S. is expected to step up its airstrikes on Islamic State targets, too. Turkey is letting it use multiple air bases in the southern part of the country for operations against the militants.

    The Pentagon announced a U.S. airstrike in Afghanistan has killed a senior al-Qaida operational commander. Abu Khalil al-Sudani was head of al-Qaida's suicide and explosives operations and has been linked to plots to attack U.S. targets.

    President Obama arrived in Kenya as part of his two-nation visit to Africa. He touched down late today in the capital city of Nairobi. It's his first presidential visit to his father's homeland. And he met with members of his family for dinner. Mr. Obama will also meet with Kenya's president and co-host a business summit before leaving for Ethiopia on Sunday.

    And, in Burundi, results from the presidential election were announced, with the incumbent winning a third term. President Pierre Nkurunziza claimed victory in the disputed election, even amid unrest over whether or not his third term is constitutional. Ballot counting started on Tuesday, and both the U.S. and Britain condemned the vote because of violence, intimidation and questions over the legitimacy of a third term.

    Back in this country, Anthem is buying Cigna to create the nation's largest health insurer by the number of people enrolled. The merged companies would cover about 53 million Americans. The deal carries a price tag of $48 billion. It follows a buyout frenzy that started earlier this month with Aetna's successful bid for Humana.

    Fiat Chrysler has announced a recall over fears some of its vehicles can be hacked remotely. The company is recalling about 1.4 million cars and trucks, including 2014 and 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokees and Dodge Durango SUVs. The move comes after cyber-security researchers were able to take control of a Jeep over the Internet. The company says it will update software to prevent hacking.

    There were new signs today of a slowdown in the real estate market. The Commerce Department reported new home sales have fallen to a seven-month low. That setback helped push stocks lower again on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 163 points to close at 17568. The Nasdaq fell more than 57 points and the S&P 500 dropped 22 points. For the week, the Dow lost nearly 3 percent, the Nasdaq fell 2.3 percent and the S&P slid 2.2 percent.

    The U.S. Justice Department is weighing a request to look into the possibility that Hillary Clinton mishandled classified information when she was secretary of state. It centered on her use of a private e-mail account. A memo from the inspector general of the intelligence community found some of the e-mails she sent potentially could have been marked classified, but none were.

    Speaking from the campaign trail today in New York, Clinton warned reporting on the story was filled with inaccuracies.

  • HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON Democratic Presidential Candidate:

    Maybe the heat is getting to everybody.

    (LAUGHTER)

  • HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON:

    We all have a responsibility to get this right. I have released 55,000 pages of e-mails. I have said repeatedly that I will answer questions before the House committee. We are all accountable to the American people to get the facts right. And I will do my part.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Republican Representative Trey Gowdy, the chairman of the special House committee investigating Clinton and her involvement in the response to the 2012 attacks in Benghazi, Libya, said handing over e-mails isn't enough. The committee wants her personal computer server for forensic evaluation.

    The Food and Drug Administration gave the green light to a new breakthrough cholesterol medication. The injectable drug called Praluent is said to lower bad cholesterol more than older medicines that have been prescribed for decades. Still, experts have raised questions about the drug's high price tag and long-term benefits.

    The FDA also proposed today new labeling rules for added sugar today. Under the proposal, food companies would need to indicate the amount of added sugar as a percentage of a person's recommended daily intake. The move is part of an overhaul of the nutrition facts label laid out by the Obama administration.

    And Don Oberdorfer, a longtime diplomatic correspondent for The Washington Post, has died. He had Alzheimer's disease. Oberdorfer spent 25 years at The Post, covering everything from the Vietnam War to the fall of the Soviet Union, before retiring in 1993. Over his career, he traveled to more than 50 countries and appeared often here on the NewsHour. Don Oberdorfer was 84 years old.

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