What do you think? Leave a respectful comment.

News Wrap: San Bernardino weapons suspect held without bond

In our news wrap Monday, the man who allegedly bought the weapons used in the San Bernardino shootings that killed 14 was ordered held without bond. Also, President Obama said in a year-end interview with NPR that he's failed to keep the public fully informed about his efforts to battle the Islamic State group.

Read the Full Transcript

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The U.S. military has suffered its worst single day in Afghanistan in a year-and-a-half. Six soldiers were killed and two wounded today in a Taliban attack. It was the strongest sign yet of the militants' resurgence. We will have details and a full report on the state of the fight against the Taliban right after the news summary.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    President Obama now says there's legitimate criticism of his efforts to battle the Islamic State group. In a year-end interview with NPR airing today, he said he's failed to keep the public fully informed about thousands of airstrikes and recaptured territory. The president also urged Americans to keep the threat in perspective.

  • PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA:

    While I understand why people are worried, the most damage they can do, though, is if they start changing how we live and what our values are. And part of my message over the next 14 months or 13 months that I remain in office is to just make sure we remember who we are and make sure that our resilience, our values, our unity are maintained.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The president also criticized Republican presidential candidates who've accused him of not doing enough to fight terror. He said it's important not just to shoot, but to aim.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The man who allegedly bought the weapons used in the San Bernardino shootings was ordered held without bond today. Enrique Marquez is accused of conspiring to aid terrorists, among other federal charges. Authorities say he bought the assault-style rifles that Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik fired at a holiday party, killing 14 people.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The first of six Baltimore police officers in the Freddie Gray case will go on trial next June 13 for a second time. A judge set the new date today for officer William Porter on manslaughter, assault and other charges. His first trial ended last week in a hung jury. Gray died in custody last April, touching off violent protests.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    World soccer moved to rid itself today of two leaders engulfed in a corruption scandal. The leader of the sport's governing body, FIFA, Sepp Blatter and his heir apparent, were banned for eight years. It stems from a payment of more than $2 million that's now part of a criminal probe.

    Steve Scott of Independent Television News has our report.

  • STEVE SCOTT:

    Unshaven, with a plaster covering the after-effects of some minor surgery, Sepp Blatter fought his way through the attention to deliver a typically defiant message shortly after hearing of his eight-year ban.

  • SEPP BLATTER, President, FIFA:

    I'm really sorry. I am sorry. I am sorry that I am still somewhere a punching ball, that I am sorry that I am, as president of FIFA, this punching ball, and I'm sorry for pro football. But I'm also sorry about me.

  • STEVE SCOTT:

    Sepp Blatter claims the 1.3 million pounds payment to Michel Platini in 2011 was part of a salary deal between the pair in 1998. Platini, Blatter's adviser at the time, agreed to take some of the wages then and guest the rest later. Blatter claims the 2011 payout settled that debt, but FIFA rules that it breached its ethics code, as the payment wasn't correctly accounted for in FIFA's books.

    For Platini, the consequences of today's verdict could not be worse. Six months ago, the front-runner to take over the presidency, that ambition now looks dead. He said today: "The FIFA ethics commission's procedure against me is a true mockery. It was orchestrated to tarnish my reputation."

    While Blatter will now not get the dignified handover of power he so wanted, muted or not, he won't give up.

  • SEPP BLATTER:

    But I will fight. I will fight for me and I will fight for FIFA. Suspended eight years, for what? But I will be back. Thank you.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Switzerland's attorney general is investigating the case. They're also looking into alleged corruption in FIFA's award of the next two World Cup finals to Russia and Qatar.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Rescuers in Southern China have spent a second day digging through a mudslide, searching for 85 missing people. Buildings crumbled as a pile of excavated dirt and construction waste, 330 feet high, collapsed Sunday at an industrial park in Shenzhen. It buried or damaged 33 buildings, including factories, offices and dormitories. At least 16 people were injured, but no deaths have been confirmed yet.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Spain braced today for weeks of political limbo, after no party won outright in Sunday's election. The ruling Conservatives celebrated winning the most votes, but failed to keep their majority in Parliament. And left-wing parties are refusing to join in a coalition. Spain has been roiled by a backlash over austerity and by unemployment that tops 20 percent. The country's stock market dropped 3 percent today on the election outcome.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Back in this country, gay and bisexual men will be able to donate blood for the first time in nearly 30 years. The Food and Drug Administration ended the ban today, saying it's not needed to prevent the transmission of the AIDS virus. The new policy still bars donations by men who have had sex with other men within the previous 12 months.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And Wall Street managed to recover a little of its losses from last week. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 123 points to close above 17250. The Nasdaq rose nearly 46 points, and the S&P 500 added 15.

Listen to this Segment

The Latest