News Wrap: Saudi Arabia promises to defend Yemen from rebel advance

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The crumbling situation in Yemen brought a new appeal, and a warning, today. The U.S.-backed president, Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, called for Gulf Arab nations to intervene against Shiite rebels allied with Iran.

    On Sunday, the rebels seized Yemen's third largest city, Taiz, and threatened to push south to Aden, where President Hadi has taken refuge. In response, Saudi Arabia warned the Arab states will act to protect Yemen against the rebel advance.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu apologized today to his country's Arab citizens. He acknowledged that comments he made in the parliamentary election campaign were offensive. Netanyahu was accused of racism when he warned on Election Day that Arabs were voting — quote — "in droves." Today, he said, "This was never my intent."

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The Obama administration wants funding to maintain Afghan forces at a maximum of 350,000 troops through 2017. That word came today as Afghan President Ashraf Ghani held meetings with top American officials at Camp David, Maryland. The U.S. effort is costing $4 billion a year, but Ghani said it's vital.

  • PRESIDENT ASHRAF GHANI, Afghanistan (through interpreter):

    This is a major statement of support. Our armed forces and our security forces are going to greet this with enormous welcome because it gives them the assurance that the resolute support mission is continuing and that we are able to focus on our key priorities.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Ghani meets tomorrow with President Obama. The two leaders are expected to agree on keeping more U.S. troops in Afghanistan for longer than originally planned.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In Syria, Islamic State fighters pressed new attacks on government forces. They attacked a military airport in Homs province, after a three-day battle farther west in Hama. They have suffered recent setbacks in Northeastern Syria, but now they're targeting provinces to the West.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The city-state of Singapore was in mourning today for longtime leader Lee Kuan Yew. He died at the age of 91 after a long illness. Lee led Singapore with an iron hand for more than 30 years, until 1990. He transformed it into an economic powerhouse, but maintained a strict social order.

    Today, mourners mostly remembered him in a favorable light.

  • HELENE NG, Singapore Resident:

    He has done very great job in building our nation, giving us what we call our home. And if not for him, you will never see Singapore on the world map. So, that is my greatest respect for him, because he really cares for the people. So I felt very sad. JUDY WOODRUFF: Lee Kuan Yew was remembered by President Obama as a visionary.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Back in this country, two new reports on police conduct. In Philadelphia, a federal review found too many officers believe fearing for their lives is reason enough to open fire. The Justice Department says that is not consistent with city policy or court rulings. The review examined nearly 400 shootings, mostly involving black suspects.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And in Chicago, the American Civil Liberties Union charges police make use of stop-and-frisk tactics that target minorities. There were more than 250,000 stops last summer, with no arrests. Blacks make up one-third of Chicago's population, but they accounted for nearly three-fourths of those stopped.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Wall Street started the week on a quiet note. The Dow Jones industrial average edged down 11 points to stay above 18100. The Nasdaq fell 15 points, and the S&P 500 slipped three.

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