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News Wrap: Six Guantanamo detainees resettled in Uruguay

In our news wrap Monday, six detainees who have been held for more than a decade at Guantanamo without being charged have arrived in Uruguay to be resettled as refugees. Also, the Justice Department released new guidelines on federal law enforcement profiling that builds on an existing policy barring racial profiling.

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    The Justice Department announced new guidelines today on federal law enforcement profiling. The rules build on a 2003 policy that barred racial profiling, and extends it to include the use of religion, national origin, and other characteristics.

    Attorney General Eric Holder said, amid anger over the killings of black men by white police officers, it's vital to have sound policing practices.

  • ERIC HOLDER, U.S. Attorney General:

    Given the limited resources that we have, given the opponents that we face, both here and certainly overseas, we can't afford to profile, to do law enforcement on the basis of stereotypes. It undermines the public trust, ultimately, but also makes us not good at what we need to do.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Security screening at airports and border checkpoints would be exempt from the new guidelines. They also don't apply to local police departments.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Six long-term detainees from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, began settling in today in Uruguay, their new home. The country's defense minister said they will be — quote — "totally free men," the same treatment refugees receive. The four Syrians, one Tunisian and one Palestinian, had been held at Guantanamo since 2002. They were originally suspected of ties to al-Qaida, but never charged; 136 detainees remain at Guantanamo, half of whom have been cleared for transfer.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In Afghanistan, the U.S. and NATO officially closed their combat mission after more than 13 years. NATO troops participated in the ceremony in Kabul, lowering a flag and formally ending their deployment. At its peak in 2011, there were 140,000 foreign troops in Afghanistan.

    After January 1, the coalition will maintain a force 13,000-strong. Most of them will be Americans, including an extra 1,000 troops announced on Saturday.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Syria and Iran today condemned Israeli airstrikes inside Syria. The attacks on Sunday hit near the Damascus Airport and a town near the Lebanese border. Israel hasn't confirmed the attacks, but previous airstrikes targeted Iranian-made missiles bound for Lebanon and for the militant group Hezbollah.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Eight people in Western China now face the death penalty in high-profile attacks that killed 46 people last spring. A court imposed the sentences today in Xinjiang Province. Authorities blamed the attacks on radical separatists with foreign connections. The province has been — has seen growing unrest as Muslim Uighurs chafe under Chinese rule.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Back in this country, two large fires raged in downtown Los Angeles early this morning, snarling rush hour traffic before fire crews could get them under control. More than 250 firefighters turned out at a block-long construction site where the first fire broke out. It spread to two neighboring high-rises and rained burning embers across roads.

  • CAPT. RICK GODINEZ, Los Angeles Fire Department:

    This is right up there with one of the most intense fires that I have seen, where it taxed a lot of our resources right away, and then the fact that there were other multiple incidents going on at the same time. It was really challenging for the incident commander to get companies into the right places to surround this thing.

    And, fortunately, we had a freeway behind us, so we had it boxed in, but it was just so intense, the heat, and it took a little while for us to get it.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Another large fire also broke out about two miles away. No injuries were reported in either incident, but both were under investigation, and fire officials wouldn't rule out arson.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The Supreme Court refused today to review BP's multibillion-dollar settlement stemming from the 2010 Gulf oil spill. The oil company argued that it's been forced to pay some businesses for losses that may not have been caused by the disaster. But the court's action makes the settlement final and starts a six-month period for filing claims.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The White House has kicked off a major initiative to train millions of high school and middle school kids in computer science. Today's announcement says the nation's seven largest school districts, along with 50 others, will begin offering introductory computer science classes. Much of the focus is on getting more girls and minorities into computer careers.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Wall Street started the week on a sour note. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 106 points to close at 17,852; the Nasdaq fell 40 points to close at 4,740; and the S&P 500 slipped 15 to finish at 2,060. Falling energy stocks led the way, as oil prices slid to $63 a barrel, a new five-year low.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    President Obama had a royal visitor from Britain today, Prince William. The pair chatted briefly in the Oval Office. Later, William delivered remarks at the World Bank on illegal wildlife trade. The prince's wife, Kate, is also in the U.S. for the visit, but she stayed in New York City, where she visited a child development center in Harlem.

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