What do you think? Leave a respectful comment.

News Wrap: State Department watchdog slams Hillary Clinton over email server

In our news wrap Wednesday, a leaked audit from the State Department’s inspector general concluded that Hillary Clinton violated federal standards by using a private email server during her tenure as Secretary of State. Also, eleven states filed suit against the Obama administration over its directive that public schools allow transgender students to use the bathroom that matches their identity.

Read the Full Transcript

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Good evening. I'm Judy Woodruff.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    And I'm Hari Sreenivasan.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    On the "NewsHour" tonight: A State Department watchdog criticizes Hillary Clinton's use of a private e-mail server and finds longstanding cyber-security weakness dating back to prior secretaries of state.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    Also ahead this Wednesday: tough words by senator Elizabeth Warren and protests against presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump, as candidates push forward in the Western states.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Plus, the nearly 70-year-long study of survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as scientists try to understand the lasting effects of the atomic bomb.

  • EVAN DOUPLE, Radiation Effects Research Foundation:

    The Manhattan Project focused so much on physics, and really didn't know very much about the biological effects and health effects in particular.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    All that and more, on tonight's "PBS NewsHour."

    (BREAK)

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    The debate over Hillary Clinton's e-mail practices as secretary of state is back on the boil. It moved there today with a leaked report from the department's inspector general.

    The report found that Clinton ignored clear directives about using a private e-mail server. And she never received approval to use it for government business. It says previous secretaries were lax about e-mail security as well, but the rules were tougher when Clinton took office.

  • MARK TONER, State Department Spokesman:

    The policies, the regulations regarding the use of private e-mail have only really been clarified in the past several years. Up until that point, again, understanding that it wasn't encouraged to use personal e-mail, but it wasn't prohibited.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    Clinton has acknowledged that, in retrospect, it was a mistake to use a private e-mail server. We will get deeper into the inspector general's report after the news summary.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In the day's other news: Eleven states have filed suit over a federal directive on public school bathrooms. The Obama administration has said states must let transgender students use bathrooms according to their gender identity or risk losing federal funding. Texas and 10 other states argue the directive amounts to a — quote — "massive social experiment" that flouts the democratic process.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    The man in charge of airport security nationwide pledged today to do something about lines that are getting longer and longer. Peter Neffenger is head of the Transportation Security Administration. He told a House hearing that the TSA expects to add nearly 800 more screeners by mid-June, but he warned that still won't be enough.

  • PETER NEFFENGER, Administrator, Transport Security Administration:

    I do think that we are at a lower staffing level than we need to be to meet peak demands at peak periods, and we're working the staffing models now aggressively with the airlines to determine the right number.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    This week, Neffenger ousted the official in charge of day-to-day security operations at the TSA.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In Afghanistan, Taliban leaders announced they have chosen their top Islamic scholar as leader. Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada is expected to continue a hard line against peace talks. He had been a deputy to Mullah Akhtar Mansour, who was killed in a U.S. drone strike last week. Today's announcement came as a Taliban suicide bomber struck a minibus in the Afghan capital, Kabul. The blast left at least 11 Afghan court employees dead.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    The government of Israel tilted further right today, as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu named a fiery ultra-nationalist to be defense minister. Avigdor Lieberman is one of Israel's most polarizing figures.

    At a ceremony today, Lieberman tried to strike a softer tone, while Netanyahu insisted he is still committed to a peace process.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    France faced a growing crisis today, as protesting workers blocked fuel depots. It stems from a showdown over legislation to make the work week longer and layoffs easier.

    Neil Connery of Independent Television News reports from Calais.

  • NEIL CONNERY:

    In Paris and across many parts of France, the fuel blockades are having a growing impact on forecourts. Drivers' frustrations are boiling over, as petrol and diesel stocks run low. The French government insists there's no need to panic-buy, but many motorists aren't taking any chances.

  • MAN (through interpreter):

    From last night until 1:00 in the morning, I searched with my wife for a petrol station. This morning, both of our two cars were on the minimum level of petrol. And we needed to drive our children to school and to go to work.

  • NEIL CONNERY:

    The trade union blockades over proposed labor law changes have become a test of wills with the French government. Oil refineries are being targeted, and the disruption is being felt far and wide.

    The government has been forced to delve into emergency petrol reserves for the past two days. This was the scene in Normandy, as one main route to the ferry port of Le Havre was blocked by protesting workers.

    Ships carrying oil have been blocked at sea off the coast of Marseille, as the protests spread.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    And to Asia, where President Obama wrapped up his visit to Vietnam today and headed to Japan. He concluded with a town hall meeting in Ho Chi Minh City, urging young people to tackle climate change, and press for greater freedoms.

    Later, crowds lined the streets as he left for the airport and a flight to Shima. There, he appeared with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, and reflected on his planned visit to Hiroshima.

  • PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA:

    War involves suffering. And we should always do what we can to prevent it. But I am the president of a nation that at times is threatened by very real risks, not imaginary risks. And it's important for us to act on occasion in order to make sure that the American people are protected.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    No U.S. president has ever visited Hiroshima, where the U.S. dropped the first atomic bomb in 1945. Prime Minister Abe said today he has no plans to visit Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, where Japan launched a surprise attack in 1941.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Back in this country, there's word federal agencies are wasting billions of dollars on maintaining computer systems that date back 50 years in some cases. The Government Accountability Office reports it's eating up three-fourths of the federal technology budget. Examples include a network for nuclear forces that still uses floppy disks, and agencies that rely on a Microsoft Windows version from 1992.

  • HARI SREENIVASAN:

    And Wall Street rallied again, on hopes the global economy might be stabilizing. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 145 points to close at 17851. The Nasdaq rose more than 33 points, and the S&P 500 added 14.

    Still to come on the "NewsHour": why Hillary Clinton's e-mail issues are being deemed more serious than her predecessors; backlash against the VA secretary for comparing hospital wait times to Disneyland; what we know about radiation 70 years after Hiroshima and Nagasaki; plus, much more.

Listen to this Segment

The Latest