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News Wrap: Trump administration must take new DACA applications, judge rules

In our news wrap Wednesday, the White House criticized a federal court ruling in favor of DACA, the program that protects young migrants from deportation. Last night, a judge in Washington ordered the administration to resume taking new applications. Also, French President Emmanuel Macron went before the U.S. Congress today with a message on leadership, Iran, climate, trade and more.

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  • Judy Woodruff:

    In the day's other news, The White House criticized a federal court ruling in favor of DACA, the program that protects young migrants from deportation. A spokesman called it extraordinarily broad and wrong. Last night, a federal judge in Washington state ordered the administration to resume taking new applications under DACA in 90 days. Previous rulings applied only to renewal requests.

    France's President Emmanuel Macron went before the U.S. Congress today with a message on leadership, Iran, climate, trade and more. It appeared to be aimed largely at President Trump.

    Lisa Desjardins has our report.

  • Lisa Desjardins:

    The French leader walked into the House chamber with clear challenges to the Trump era and nationalist waves across the world.

  • Emmanuel Macron:

    You can play with fears and anger for a time, but they do not construct anything.

  • Lisa Desjardins:

    Macron warned against going it alone, or turning a blind eye toward world problems.

  • Emmanuel Macron:

    We can choose isolationism, withdrawal and nationalism, but closing the door to the world will not stop the evolution of the world.

  • Lisa Desjardins:

    Instead, the French president said now is the time to stabilize NATO and other international institutions. He also urged the U.S., again, to remain in the Iran nuclear agreement. Macron acknowledged the deal is not perfect. But he advocated keeping it in place and negotiating additional measures.

  • Emmanuel Macron:

    We shouldn't abandon it without having something substantial and more substantial instead. That's my position.

    (APPLAUSE)

  • Lisa Desjardins:

    Mainly Democrats applauded. But Macron cares most about an audience of one, President Trump, who yesterday called the Iran deal insane. To bring Mr. Trump on board, Macron suggests a supplemental agreement on Iran's ballistic missile program and regional influence.

    Similarly, President Trump's withdraw from the Paris accord on climate change was a target for Macron.

  • Emmanuel Macron:

    I am sure, one day, the United States will come back and join the Paris agreement. Let's face it: There is no planet B.

    (APPLAUSE)

  • Lisa Desjardins:

    He even reworked President Trump's trademark campaign slogan.

  • Emmanuel Macron:

    Let's work together in order to make our planet great again.

  • Lisa Desjardins:

    Another seeming difference with President Trump, trade. Both parties clapped as Macron denounced tariff and trade wars.

  • Emmanuel Macron:

    At the end of the day, it will destroy jobs, increase prices, and the middle class will have to pay for it.

  • Lisa Desjardins:

    The address to Congress was Macron's last major stop on a three-day visit to the U.S.

    For the "PBS NewsHour," I'm Lisa Desjardins.

  • Judy Woodruff:

    The president of Iran issued a fresh warning to the U.S. today not to quit the 2015 nuclear agreement. Hassan Rouhani insisted his government will not renegotiate even one sentence. And he mocked President Trump's criticism of the deal.

  • Hassan Rouhani (through translator):

    He says this a very bad deal. Well, if it is a very bad deal, then why did the U.S. government sign it? You don't have any background in law. You don't have any background on international treaties. How can a tradesman, a building constructor make judgments about international affairs?

  • Judy Woodruff:

    The back-and-forth comes as European leaders are trying to work out additional restrictions on Iran that would satisfy President Trump.

    Back in this country, a federal grand try in South Carolina has indicted 14 state prison employees for smuggling drugs, cell phones, and other contraband to inmates. State officials say phones, in particular, can help prisoners plot uprisings. Just last week, a prison riot in Bishopville left seven inmates dead. It was sparked by rival gangs fighting over turf.

    The U.S. military says reports of sexual assaults in the services jumped nearly 10 percent in 2017. It came as the MeToo movement put a spotlight on sexual misconduct and a scandal involving online nude photos rocked the U.S. Marine Corps. The Marines had the largest increase in assault reports, at nearly 15 percent.

    An independent commission called today for sweeping reforms to end corruption in college basketball. It proposed an end to so-called one-and-done, players turning professional after their freshmen year. That would mean changing NBA rules. The commission also urged lifetime bans for college coaches who cheat.

    Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice chaired the panel. In Indianapolis today, she appealed to school presidents and coaches.

  • Condoleezza Rice:

    These are the people who are most responsible for giving these young men a chance to achieve college education and a college degree. And, frankly, some have given in instead to incentives to win at all costs.

  • Judy Woodruff:

    The commission was formed in the wake of a federal investigation into alleged bribery and corruption in college basketball.

    Republicans in Arizona held on to a U.S. House seat in Tuesday's special election, but it was close. The GOP's Debbie Lesko beat Democrat Hiral Tipirneni by five points in a district that President Trump carried by 21 points. Lesko succeeds Congressman Trent Franks, who resigned over sexual misconduct allegations.

    Federal Housing Secretary Ben Carson is out with a proposal to change rents in public housing. If Congress agrees, it would mean some two million families will pay more, possibly triple what they pay now. Another two million-plus households, the elderly and those with disabilities, would be exempt. The proposal also allows for requiring tenants to work for their benefits.

    And on Wall Street today, the Dow Jones industrial average gained 59 points to close at 24083. The Nasdaq fell three points, and the S&P 500 added five.

    And his family says that former President George H.W. Bush is improving and has moved out of intensive care at a Houston hospital. The 93-year-old is being treated for an infection that spread to his blood. He was hospitalized a day after the funeral for his wife, Barbara.

    Still to come on the "NewsHour," we examine the arguments over the travel ban at the Supreme Court; I sit down with the former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates; President Trump defends his embattled Veterans Affairs nominee; and much more.

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