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News Wrap: Turkish soldier killed by Islamic State fire

In our news wrap Thursday, Islamic State militants fired across the border from Syria into Turkey, killing one soldier and wounding two others. That comes days after a suicide attack killed 32 in a southeastern Turkish town. Also, prosecutors announced that results of Sandra Bland's autopsy show her injuries as consistent with suicide, not violent homicide.

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    Islamic State militants fired across the border from Syria into Turkey today, killing one soldier and wounding two others. Turkish troops returned fire near the town of Kilis, on the border with Syria. It's a key transport point for both Islamic State fighters and equipment. It comes just days after a suicide attack targeted young political activists in a southeastern Turkish town, killing 32 people.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Turkey has agreed to let the U.S. start using one of its air bases at Incirlik for strikes against Islamic State militants in Syria. The agreement, first reported by The Wall Street Journal, came after months of negotiations. It will let the U.S. use the base for manned and unmanned planes, including Predator drones.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Back in the U.S., the director of the FBI now says the Islamic State poses a greater threat to the U.S. than al-Qaida. At a security forum in Aspen, Colorado last night, James Comey cited the militants' year-old campaign on social media to inspire Americans to radicalize.

  • JAMES COMEY, FBI Director:

    The threat that ISIL presents, poses to the United States is very different in kind, in type, in degree than al-Qaida. ISIL is not your parents' al-Qaida. It's a very different model, and by virtue of that model, it's currently the threat that we're worrying about in the homeland most of all.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Comey also noted the FBI has arrested a significant number of people over the past eight weeks who were radicalized. And he said some of them were planning attacks around the July 4 holiday.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    More details emerged in the case of Sandra Bland, a black woman who was found hanging in a Texas jail cell last week. Prosecutors delivered results from her autopsy, saying her injuries were consistent with suicide, not violent homicide.

    Waller County Prosecutor Warren Diepraam spoke today in Hempstead, Texas.

  • WARREN DIEPRAAM, Waller County Prosecutor:

    The hands are significant. In a violent homicide or a murder where one person takes another person's life, it is typical, although not in all cases, but it is typical to see some sort of injuries on the person's hands, defensive injuries. They found no evidence whatsoever of any injuries on Ms. Bland's hands.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Bland also had a substantial amount of marijuana in her system, according to preliminary results of testing. Authorities said it was unclear when or how the marijuana was ingested.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The Republican-led House today approved a bill that would crack down on so-called sanctuary cities that protect residents from federal immigration authorities. It comes in the wake of the shooting death of a California woman, allegedly by an illegal immigrant with a long criminal record who'd already been deported multiple times.

    The legislation cuts off federal funds for cities that don't deport undocumented immigrants. But House leaders differ on how to go about solving the issue.

    REP. JOHN BOEHNER (R-OH), Speaker of the House: Some decide to ignore our laws. And not only is that wrong, but it's clearly dangerous as well. The House is acting today to put state and local officials on notice that we will no longer allow them to decide how and when to enforce our nation's laws.

    REP. NANCY PELOSI (D-CA), House Minority Leader: What would solve most of it, no guarantee of all of it, is to pass comprehensive immigration reform. What we also have to look at is, how did this person come into possession of a gun in a state where his having a gun, as a convicted felon, would raise serious questions?

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The bill faces an uncertain fate in the Senate. In a statement, the White House promised a veto should the legislation reach the president's desk.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    European regulators opened an antitrust case against six major Hollywood movie studios and a British satellite broadcaster today. Officials said the studios are illegally blocking consumers in most of Europe from watching U.S. movies, shows and other content because of contracts they made with Sky U.K. The six studios are Disney, NBC Universal, Paramount, Sony, 20th Century Fox, and Warner Bros.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Greece is one step closer to receiving a new bailout, after its Parliament approved crucial banking and judiciary reforms. The vote came in the early hours of the morning, surviving a revolt from a rebel group of left-wing Syriza lawmakers. That paves the way for the debt-stricken country to begin talks with its European creditors over a third bailout, valued at $93 billion.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Another round of lackluster corporate earnings reports pushed stocks lower on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 119 points to close just under 17732. The Nasdaq fell 25 points, and the S&P 500 slipped 12.

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