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News Wrap: UN draft climate accord faces criticism at Germany talks

In our news wrap Monday, as a week of UN climate talks opened in Germany, African states complained that their demands for the draft accord had been ignored. Also, a security firm says that China's agreement not to hack U.S. corporate computers has already been violated repeatedly.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In the day's other news, a week of United Nations' talks on climate change opened in Germany, leading up to a December summit in Paris, and the draft accord immediately faced criticism.

    The talks convened in Bonn, with African states complaining their demands were ignored. South Africa called it apartheid against developing nations.

    But the U.N.'s climate chief played down the disagreement.

  • CHRISTIANA FIGUERES, Executive Secretary, U. N. Climate Conference:

    They realize the urgency of this. They realize that we have been working on this for a long time, necessarily so, because this is the most profound transformation of the global economy that we have seen in recent times. So, it's understandable that this is complex.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Meanwhile, in Washington, President Obama met with corporate leaders who have committed to the U.S. pledge on reducing carbon emissions. In all, 81 companies have agreed to support it.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    There's word that China's agreement not to hack U.S. corporate computers has already been violated repeatedly. President Obama and Chinese President Xi reached that agreement last month in Washington. Now the security firm CrowdStrike says fresh attacks started the very next day. It says the hackers are linked to the Chinese government.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    U.S. government officials moved today to begin cracking down on unsafe flying by drone aircraft. A task force will come up with rules to mandate that heavier, higher-flying drones be registered. Officials said the decision follows a growing number of close calls, involving near-accidents with passenger planes and interference with firefighting operations.

    ANTHONY FOXX, Secretary of Transportation: We can take enforcement action as necessary to protect the airspace for everyone. If unmanned aircraft operators break the rules, clearly, there should be consequences, but in fact there can be no accountability if a person breaking the rules can't be identified.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    There's no official count of how many drones are already in private hands in the U.S., but the industry projects 700,000 will be sold this holiday season.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In Syria, United Nations officials now say a government ground offensive has 35,000 people on the run. They have fled areas near Aleppo. The Syrian army and its allies are attacking there, supported by Russian airstrikes.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The toll from the hajj Islamic holy day stampede in Saudi Arabia last month has grown to more than 2,100. That Associated Press tally is based on news media reports and official comments from dozens of countries. The official Saudi government figure remains at 769.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The story of a hospital bombed by U.S. forces in Afghanistan took a new turn today. The October 3 attack in Kunduz killed 22 people and wounded many more. Now the acting defense minister says Taliban wounded and other fighters were there, along with a Taliban flag on one wall.

  • MASOOM STANEKZAI, Acting Defense Minister, Afghanistan:

    That was a place where they wanted to use it as a kind of a safe base, because everybody knows that we — the security forces, the international security forces were very careful not to do anything with the hospital.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Doctors Without Borders has insisted there were no insurgents in the hospital.

    In another development, the U.S. military acknowledged today that an armored vehicle crashed into the hospital compound last week. The troops went in to examine the bombing damage, and believed, mistakenly, no one was there.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Canadians headed to the polls today in a parliamentary election that could result in their first new leader in a decade. Conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper trailed Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau in recent opinion polls. Harper has clashed with President Obama over the Iran nuclear deal and the Keystone pipeline.

    Back in this country, the state of Ohio announced this evening that it will delay all executions until 2017. Officials cited problems obtaining drugs for lethal injections. The delay affects more than two dozen planned executions.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    First lady Michelle Obama has opened a new front in her campaign to educate more teens beyond high school. A new Web site, bettermakeroom.org, will let students swap information about exams, financial aid and college applications. Mrs. Obama announced the effort at the White House, as part of her Reach Higher initiative.

  • MICHELLE OBAMA:

    It's about valuing success in the classroom, instead of just on the big screen or on the basketball court. And it's about turning the culture of celebrity upside down, so that we don't just have kids worshipping celebrities, but we also have celebrities honoring kids who are working hard and achieving their goals.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The first lady takes her campaign to the University of Akron this week, where she will be joined by NBA star LeBron James.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And Wall Street had a muted Monday after China reported its third-quarter growth was the lowest since early 2009. The Dow Jones industrial average gained just 14 points to close at 17230. The Nasdaq rose 18 points, and the S&P 500 added half-a-point.

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