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News Wrap: UN Security Council approves Iran nuclear deal

In our news wrap Monday, the U.N. Security Council voted unanimously to approve the Iran nuclear deal, setting the stage for the lifting of economic sanctions in return for limits on Tehran’s nuclear capabilities. Also, a suicide bombing at a cultural center near Turkey’s border killed 31 people.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Good evening, and welcome to our new home for the PBS NewsHour.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Judy and I are settling into our new set, with fresh graphics and updated music, yet with the classic sound you have come to recognize as the signal that the NewsHour is on the air.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    We think this new look will give us greater flexibility and a new tool, so that we can better present the same quality journalism and analysis that the "NewsHour" has been doing for almost 40 years

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And now let's get to the news.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The United Nations Security Council voted unanimously today to approve the nuclear deal negotiated in Vienna last week. The vote was 15-0, and it sets the stage for the lifting of economic sanctions, in exchange for limits on Tehran's nuclear capabilities.

    In Washington, President Obama hailed the endorsement and called on Congress, which now has 60 days to review the deal, to approve it.

  • PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA:

    There's broad international consensus around this issue, not just among the international community, but also among experts in nuclear proliferation. And my working assumption is, is that Congress will pay attention to that broad-based consensus.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The president made the remarks as he met with Nigeria's president, Muhammadu Buhari. It's his first White House visit since he was elected in March in Nigeria's first democratic transition of power in decades.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In Turkey, an explosion rocked Suruc near the border with Syria, killing 31 people. Turkish officials said the attack appeared to be a suicide bombing inspired by the Islamic State group. The midday explosion took place at a cultural center, as a group of young political activists was wrapping up a news conference. Nearly 100 people were wounded.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The death toll from fierce fighting in Yemen yesterday has now risen to nearly 100. Shiite rebels bombarded a town close to the port city of Aden. The head of an international aid group says Sunday's fighting was the worst day in three months. Meanwhile, Saudi-led fighter jets kept up their bombing campaign and hit a popular market in the Yemeni capital of Sanaa.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    A NATO airstrike on two Afghan military checkpoints killed seven Afghan troops today. Afghan officials described it as an accident. Taliban fighters were clashing with troops near their remote checkpoints in Logar province at the same time coalition helicopters flew overhead. Afghan President Ashraf Ghani expressed his profound sorrow over the incident and ordered an investigation.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    There were more questions than answers today in the death of a young black woman in a Texas jail last week.

    Correspondent William Brangham has our story.

  • REV. JAMAL BRYANT, Empowerment Temple Church:

    We strategically picked this place because we know we're standing on a crime scene.

  • WILLIAM BRANGHAM:

    Religious leaders and community activists spoke today outside the Waller County Jail, the same Texas jail where 28-year-old Sandra Bland died under mysterious circumstances a week ago.

    The incident began on July 10. In this video filmed on a bystander's cell phone, Bland is seen being pinned to the ground by two state troopers. The troopers say Bland had just assaulted an officer after they'd pulled her over for a traffic violation. Bland was arrested, and taken to the county jail. Three days later, she was found dead in her cell.

    The sheriff's office says Bland committed suicide by hanging herself with a plastic bag. Officials also pointed to a Facebook video Ms. Bland posted several months ago saying she was depressed.

    SANDRA BLAND, Died in Police Custody: I am suffering from something that some of you all may be dealing with right now. It's a little bit of depression, as well as PTSD.

  • WILLIAM BRANGHAM:

    But Bland's family and others don't believe it. They say that video was made when Bland was unemployed, and that she'd just started a new job at her alma mater, Prairie View A&M University, and was very excited about her prospects.

  • REV. JAMAL BRYANT:

    This wasn't a lazy woman. This wasn't an unmotivated woman. This is a woman who had dreams and had desires and had drive.

  • WILLIAM BRANGHAM:

    Today's press conference followed several days of vigils and protest marches for Bland in her native Illinois and in Texas.

    For the PBS NewsHour, I'm William Brangham.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Local prosecutors have promised a full investigation into Bland's death. Today, they pointed to surveillance video from inside the jail that shows no one entered or exited her cell around the time she is believed to have died.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Greeks lined up outside banks today to withdraw money for the first time in more than three weeks. A steady stream of customers made their way to ATMs and banks, but there were strict limits on how much cash they could take out. And shopkeepers changed the prices on their goods to reflect the higher taxes they're charging under the terms of an E.U. rescue deal.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The price of gold continued its slide today, hitting a five-year low. The drop was helped along by the dollar's gain and a looming interest rate hike. On Wall Street today, stocks were relatively stagnant. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 13 points to close at 18100. The Nasdaq added eight points and the S&P 500 gained more than a point.

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