What do you think? Leave a respectful comment.

News Wrap: W.Va. investigating what caused explosive oil train accident

Read the Full Transcript

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    A wintry blast has left hundreds of thousands of people without power in the Mid-Atlantic and Southern U.S. The Carolinas and Georgia bore the brunt of the outages after the region was covered with several inches of snow and ice. Snowplows were out in full force to clear the roads and highways.

    In Raleigh, North Carolina, Governor Pat McCrory warned the hazardous conditions will last for several more days.

    GOV. PAT MCCRORY, (R) North Carolina: We will continue to see downed trees and power lines as they succumb to the weight of the ice. So that is a big concern down the — as the days and nights go ahead, is the ice on the power lines. And while we see some temperatures rise a few degrees above freezing this afternoon, these temperatures will drop below freezing tonight, causing our roads to refreeze.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Farther north, in the nation's capital, the federal government was closed today after the area got up to six inches of snow overnight. The same storm system is now barreling up the East Coast, towards the already winter-weary residents of New England.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In West Virginia, officials launched an investigation into why a train loaded with over a hundred tankers full of crude oil derailed. A massive fireball rose hundreds of feet into the air after yesterday's accident in Mount Carbon. The tracks may have been slippery from snowfall, but it's not clear that caused the accident. Hundreds of families evacuated and two water treatment plants were forced to close.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The U.S. has changed its regulations on weapon sales and will allow armed military drones to be sold to friendly nations. The State Department announced the policy change today. Allies who buy the drones will have to agree not to use the unmanned aircraft illegally, for unlawful surveillance or against domestic populations.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Intelligence officials in Denmark admitted today they had received warnings about the suspected gunman in last weekend's shootings in Copenhagen. They came from prison officials who said Omar Abdel Hamid El-Hussein was at risk of becoming radicalized while in jail last year. El-Hussein was killed in a shoot-out with police after he killed two people at a cultural center and synagogue.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The president of Egypt called on the U.N. to form a coalition and intervene in Libya to fight the threat of Islamic State militants there. The request comes after the terrorist group beheaded 21 Egyptian Coptic Christians in Libya.

    President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi made his plea during a recorded audio interview that aired in Egypt today.

    PRESIDENT ABDEL FATTAH AL-SISI, Egypt (through interpreter): What is going on in Libya could change this country into a breeding ground that will threaten the whole region, and not only Egypt. Egypt, the Mediterranean Basin and Europe have to deal with this problem because the mission was unaccomplished, was unfinished by our European friends. We abandoned the Libyan people as prisoners to extremist militias.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The U.N. Security Council will meet for an emergency session in response to the crisis in Libya tomorrow.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In Syria today, a surprise attack on six villages brought government forces closer to their goal of taking back rebel-held neighborhoods in Aleppo. Parts of the country's largest city have been in opposition control since 2012. More than 100 people died in heavy fighting on both sides. Late this afternoon, the Syrian envoy to the U.N. said now they're willing to suspend the aerial bombardment of Aleppo for six weeks.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    A suicide attack killed at least 20 people today at a provincial police headquarters in Afghanistan. Four Taliban bombers stormed the heavily fortified compound about 40 miles south of Kabul. Local officials said they were dressed in Afghan police uniforms and detonated their explosives in several waves. Eight people were wounded.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In Haiti, the final day of Carnival celebrations was canceled after an accident on a float killed 16 people and injured 78 others. A singer on a parade float ran into electrical wires in the early morning hours, setting off a stampede by bystanders. Many of those killed were trampled to death.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Schools across Liberia began opening their doors this week to students, for the first time in six months. They were forced to close with the spread of the Ebola virus. The outbreak killed nearly 4,000 Liberians, but there are now only a handful of cases. Before students were allowed in, teachers explained how to protect against Ebola. Schoolchildren also had to rinse their hands and have their temperature checked.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    On Wall Street today, stocks edged slightly higher as investors kept a wary eye on talks over Greece and its debt. The Dow Jones industrial average was up 28 points to close over 18000. The Nasdaq rose five points. And the S&P 500 added three points.

Listen to this Segment

The Latest