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News Wrap: Obama to seek Supreme Court approval on immigration authority

In our news wrap Tuesday, the Obama administration will ask the Supreme Court to allow it to shield 5 million immigrants from deportation after a federal appeals court panel ruled against the president's executive orders on immigration. Also, the Senate overwhelmingly passed a defense bill that includes a ban on moving Guantanamo detainees to the U.S.

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    Republicans prepared today for their fourth presidential debate, this time in Milwaukee. The top eight polling candidates, a smaller field than before, will face off on economic issues on FOX Business Network at 9:00 Eastern time. Lower-polling candidates meet earlier.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The Obama administration will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to let it protect five million immigrants from deportation. That's after a federal appeals court panel ruled against the president's executive orders to do just that. Monday's ruling upheld an injunction issued by a federal judge in Texas.

    Today, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said the administration is determined to continue the fight.

  • JOSH EARNEST, White House Press Secretary:

    We're quite disappointed in the decision that was rendered by the Fifth Circuit, but it did not in any way diminish the confidence that we have in the power of our legal argument. And we're looking forward to having an opportunity making that argument again before the Supreme Court.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In all, 26 states have challenged the president's actions on immigration, saying they illegally circumvent Congress.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The Senate overwhelmingly passed a defense bill today that includes a ban on moving Guantanamo Bay detainees to the United States. It's the latest obstacle to President Obama's pledge to close the detention facility before he leaves office. Still, the White House said he will sign the $600 billion measure because of other important provisions.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The worst El Nino weather pattern in decades could threaten 11 million children in Africa with hunger, disease and drought. The United Nations Children's Fund, UNICEF, issued that warning today.

    In a statement, it said: "The consequences could ripple through generations, unless affected communities receive support."

    The weather pattern has already caused severe drought in Ethiopia and flooding in Somalia.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    In Myanmar, official results from Sunday's elections kept trickling in today, as the opposition claimed a landslide win. The country's constitution bars opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi from becoming president.

    But she told Singapore's Channel News Asia she expects to be the de facto leader.

  • AUNG SAN SUU KYI, Opposition Leader:

    In any democratic country, it's the leader of the winning party who becomes the leader of the government, and if this constitution doesn't allow it, then we will have to make arrangements so that we can proceed along usual democratic lines.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Myanmar's military gave way to an elected regime in 2011, but it retains control of key parts of the government.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Russia now says its ban on flights to Egypt will last at least the next several months over security concerns. A Russian airliner crashed in the Sinai Peninsula on October 31 after taking off from Sharm el-Sheikh. All 224 people on board were killed. U.S. and British officials say it's likely a bomb destroyed the plane.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Russian sports officials are denying accusations of widespread doping among track and field athletes. The World Anti-Doping Agency said yesterday that Moscow has allowed a state-sponsored drug culture.

    Today, the head of the country's athletics federation dismissed the report and said it shouldn't block Russian athletes from next year's Olympics.

  • VADIM ZELICHENOK, Acting President, Russian Athletics Federation (through interpreter):

    I am sorry. I want to ask once again, what are these athletes guilty of? They have never had any record of doping violations. Why should they be deprived of this opportunity because of the corruption you have mentioned and which had taken place several years ago? In any case, currently, it doesn't exist.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    President Vladimir Putin will meet with the head of the Russian Track Federation tomorrow. Today, Putin's spokesman said the accusations appear to be — quote — "rather unfounded."

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Federal prosecutors in New York have charged three people in a huge theft of consumer data from the nation's biggest bank. An indictment unsealed today said two Israelis and an American stole information on more than 80 million households and small business customers at J.P. Morgan Chase. The crimes were carried out between 2012 and this past summer.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    This was a sluggish day on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 27 points to close near 17760. The Nasdaq lost 12 points, and the S&P 500 added three.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    There's word this evening former President Jimmy Carter is responding well to cancer treatment. A spokeswoman says doctors have found no sign of new tumors. Mr. Carter is 91. He announced last August that he'd been diagnosed with cancer that spread to his brain.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    We are also marking two passings of note.

    Former West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt died at his home in Hamburg. Schmidt led West Germany from 1974 to 1982, through economic turbulence and Cold War tensions. He also backed the U.S. boycott of the Moscow Olympics in 1980, but said later that nothing was gained from it. Helmut Schmidt was 96 years old.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And legendary New Orleans musician Allen Toussaint died in Spain today after a heart attack. He was a pianist and performer who wrote and produced a long line of hits for himself and others, including "Working in a Coal Mine" and "Lady Marmalade."

    Here he is recording "Who's Gonna Help Brother Get Further?" for a 2006 album with Elvis Costello, as seen in a BBC documentary.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Toussaint joined the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998 and was awarded the National Humanities Medal in 2013. At his death, he was 77 years old.

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