The stork brings an eaglet: Bald eagle hatches at National Arboretum

As they welcomed a new member of the family this morning, all eyes were on “Mr. President” and “The First Lady” -- not the Obamas, but a pair of bald eagles nesting at the National Arboretum. A webcam captured their newborn eaglet, for now dubbed “DC-2,” as it emerged from its egg Friday. The family represents the first bald eagles to occupy the Arboretum since 1947.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And now for our "NewsHour" Shares, something that caught our eye that we thought might be of interest to you too.

    All eyes today were on Mr. President and the first lady, as they added a new member to the family, not the Obamas, but rather, a pair of bald eagles nesting at the National Arboretum in Washington, D.C. A Web camera captured the first of possibly two eaglets fully emerging from its egg this morning.

    Biologists say the baby bald eagle known for now as DC2 appears to be doing well and is already being fed. The second egg, which was laid a few days after its sibling, could hatch over the weekend. The two adult bald eagles are the first pair to nest at the National Arboretum since 1947. They successfully raised their first eaglet last summer.

    What can you say but aww?

    On the "NewsHour" online: what a Trump presidency would mean for America's role in the world. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner talked to U.S. diplomats and foreign correspondents to get their unique take on the 2016 race.

    You can read about that on our home page, PBS.org/NewsHour.

    And later this evening on "Washington Week," Gwen Ifill and her panelists will have more analysis and insight into the week's big news. Here's a preview.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    What's not to like about Merrick Garland? Senate Republicans say it's not personal, but still they will not confirm this president's Supreme Court nominee. Plus, why do John Kasich, Ted Cruz and Bernie Sanders think they still have a chance? We explain the delegate math for both Democrats and Republicans, and what it means for the nominating conventions, or we will try to.

    That's later tonight on "Washington Week" — Judy.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    On "PBS NewsHour Weekend" Saturday, from South Africa, a look at efforts by the government to regulate the practice of traditional healing.

    And we will be back right here on Monday with a report on President Obama's historic trip to Havana, what it means for Cuba and the U.S.

    That's the "NewsHour" for tonight. I'm Judy Woodruff.

    Have a great weekend. Thank you, and good night.

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