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Not Trending: More stress for female commuters, rediscovering Dr. Seuss

When we only pay attention to the things that are trending in our social networks, we may be missing some compelling stories. Carlos Watson, CEO of website Ozy, joins Gwen Ifill to share a few overlooked items, including a commuter's counter-argument to the "Lean In" campaign and rediscovering unpublished works by Dr. Seuss.

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  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Next: a look at some important stories online that are not trending.

    Gwen Ifill recorded this conversation yesterday.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The Web can be a vast and confusing place, so occasionally we like to point you to the interesting reports brought to our attention by our partners at the Web site OZY. CEO Carlos Watson joins me now.

    There are such interesting thing which pop up along the way that just don't trend, that we don't see, that nobody talks about. And one of them is kind of the counterargument about women who are supposed to lean in. And you discovered that in fact there are reasons why women don't that have nothing to do with whether they are willing to or not.

  • CARLOS WATSON, CEO, OZY:

    Very interesting.

    So reports both out of the U.S. and out of the U.K. said that commuting has a much larger impact on women than it does on men, even though men often have longer commutes, longer times at work. But they say that many women, maybe sometimes up to four times as much, feel the psychological impact and the burden of commuting, and as a result often that's one of the reasons that they don't lean in at work.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    You say psychological impact of commuting. I don't even understand what that means. Does that mean that they feel like they have to get home sooner, they have to leave earlier, they have to have primary responsibility for kids?

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    All of the above and then some.

    The argument is it's something calling trip-chaining, that many women on their way home are not just listening to music or watching the latest episode of "House of Cards," but instead are stopping by the dry cleaner or going by the grocery store, often twice as much, picking up kids, shuttling kids around, and that all of that creates more stress and they end up approaching that travel not as something to kind of de-stress and relax. But instead it's something that causes more anxiety.

    And it causes some women, according to this study about 15,000 women, many of them, to kind of say, I'm not going to work at certain kinds of job that are going to lengthen my commute even further.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Why does it work in Iceland?

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    Very interesting. You know I love that story.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    I love that story.

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    So, you're talking about the story of Iceland, where 70 percent of the kids are born to women who aren't married. Even one of the leading presidential candidates, recently, that was true. And they're not having the same kind of stress.

    Well, they say a couple things. One, they say that marriage, while that's not present, the partnerships are more balanced and that often the men and in some cases the state provides for more child care, for more help with delivery and other services. And so there's a greater village, if you will, helping take care some of the ride home.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And there's no stigma attached to it. So interesting.

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    No stigma attached to it. In fact, it's been that way for a long time, for over 100 years.

    Remember, this was a fishing community largely. And many men unfortunately died young and died at sea. And so the same kind of stigma attached to whether or not you were married wasn't there. And so people were leaning in, to use the phrase, to help grow those families.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Here's a fun one.

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    Yes.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Now, we spent a lot of time on this program talking about the undiscovered manuscript of Harper Lee, who wrote "To Kill a Mockingbird." We got very excited that it had never existed before.

    But we found another undiscovered manuscript.

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    We got a "Cat in the Hat."

  • GWEN IFILL:

    A "Cat in the Hat," Dr. Seuss.

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    Yes, Dr. Seuss, who wrote 46 books, guess what? There are now going to be three more.

    They just found a new book, new manuscript and drawings his widow did in her house in La Jolla, California.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Theodor Geisel was his actual name.

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    Theodor Geisel was his actual name.

    You know what to know the funny story how he became called Dr. Seuss?

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Yes.

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    He was involved in a little fun at Dartmouth College, got in trouble, got thrown off the paper, still wanted to write cartoons for it and decided to use his middle name, his mom's maiden name as kind of his pseudonym, and then later in life added a doctor to it because it sounded a little more professional.

    And although his name was Ted Geisel, and he was a successful Don Draper-like ad executive, what he really wanted to do, this Oxford-trained writer, was write children's books.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    And he wrote some more that we didn't even know about.

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    He wrote some more. There will be another one coming out in July. And then on top of that, they say there's enough material for at least two more.

    For those of you who love "Green Eggs and Ham," for those of you who knows what places you will go, you now get something more.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    You have figured me out, Carlos.

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    Finally. Finally, long last.

    (LAUGHTER)

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Carlos Watson from OZY, thank you very much.

  • CARLOS WATSON:

    Always good to be with you.

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