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In message to poachers, Kenya sets ablaze more than 100 tons of confiscated elephant and rhino tusks

An estimated 115 tons of elephant and rhino tusks confiscated by authorities were set ablaze in Kenya on Saturday to draw attention to the country’s continued fight against poaching.

Africa’s population of elephants and rhinos are dwindling, as poachers killed an estimated 20,000 elephants and 1,300 rhinos just last year.

Kenyan president Uhuru Kenyatta initiated the burning in Nairobi National Park.

Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta lights elephant tusks, part of an estimated 105 tonnes of confiscated ivory from smugglers and poachers, on fire at Nairobi National Park near Nairobi, Kenya, April 30, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya - RTX2C8K6

Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta lights elephant tusks on fire at Nairobi National Park near Nairobi, Kenya, April 30, 2016. Photo by Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

A fire expert monitors the burning of confiscated ivory from smugglers and poachers, at the Nairobi National Park near Nairobi, Kenya, April 30, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

A fire expert monitors the burning of confiscated ivory from smugglers and poachers, at the Nairobi National Park near Nairobi, Kenya, April 30, 2016. Photo by Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

A general view shows part of the 105 tonnes of elephant tusks confiscated ivory from smugglers and poachers burning at the Nairobi National Park near Nairobi, Kenya, April 30, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya - RTX2C94J

Onlookers watch elephant tusks confiscated ivory from smugglers and poachers burning at the Nairobi National Park near Nairobi, Kenya, April 30, 2016. Photo by Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

Kenya Wildlife Services rangers patrol as they guard the burning of an estimated 105 tonnes of Elephant tusks confiscated ivory from smugglers and poachers at the Nairobi National Park near Nairobi, Kenya, April 30, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya - RTX2C956

Kenya Wildlife Services rangers patrol as they guard the burning of an estimated 105 tonnes of Elephant tusks confiscated ivory from smugglers and poachers at the Nairobi National Park near Nairobi, Kenya, April 30, 2016. Photo by Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

Black market buyers from Asia and the United States have driven the price of ivory to $1,000 per pound, and rhino horn to $45,000 per pound, making it more expensive than gold, PBS NewsHour reported in January.

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