What do you think? Leave a respectful comment.

From Somalia to Spain: See how youth unemployment compares across the globe

On PBS NewsHour Sunday, IBN correspondent Jamal Osman reports from Somalia, where one of the world’s highest youth unemployment rates is contributing to a so-called “lost generation” as thousands of young Somalis leave home and attempt the difficult and dangerous migration to Europe.

Somali migrant Abririsak Mohamud Anama prepares to leave for France at the Hal Far Reception Centre outside Valletta in this July 9, 2009 file photo. As many as 900 people may have died in Sunday's disaster off the coast of Libya. That would be the highest death toll in recent times among migrants, who are trafficked in the tens of thousands in rickety vessels across the Mediterranean. The mass deaths have caused shock in Europe, where a decision to scale back naval operations last year seems to have increased the risks for migrants without reducing their numbers. The European Union has proposed doubling the size of its Mediterranean search and rescue operations in response to the crisis.  REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi/Files   MALTA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN MALTA PICTURE 25 OF 28 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'ISLE LANDERS' SEARCH 'DARRIN ISLE' FOR ALL IMAGES - RTX19ZEF

Somali migrant Abririsak Mohamud Anama prepares to leave for France at the Hal Far Reception Centre outside Valletta in this July 9, 2009 file photo. In Somalia today, one of the world’s highest youth unemployment rates is contributing to a so-called “lost generation” as thousands of young Somalis leave home and attempt the difficult and dangerous migration to Europe. Photo by Darrin Zammit Lupi/Reuters

Overall youth unemployment in Somalia is roughly 67 percent, according to the U.N. Development Program, though that number may be as high as 75 or 80 percent in some parts of the country.

Some of the issues underlying the country’s employment problems, like decades of conflict and environmental degradation, are specific to Somalia. But the East African nation also suffers from more mundane economic issues that plague nations the world over, including a mismatch between the education available to Somali youths and the skills they actually need to find employment.

PBS NewsHour decided to take a look at youth unemployment around the world to see how countries compare. Here are the numbers.

Data source: U.N. Development Report 2013; World Bank youth unemployment data (both based on International Labor Organization data)| Graphic by Daniel Costa-Roberts/NewsHour Weekend

A note on the data: The data for the majority of the countries describes youth unemployment from 2005-2011, and thus may not precisely match the countries’ current youth unemployment rates.

In order to be as consistent as possible, most of the country data used to create this graphic comes from the 2013 U.N. Development Report. But for two key countries whose youth unemployment levels that report didn’t address, Somalia and China, statistics from the U.N.’s Somalia Human Development Report 2012 and from the World Bank were used, respectively.

The Latest