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Ricky Tims

 

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A Century of Quilts:  America in Cloth
Ricky TIms
"Pink Flower Prelude"
Third Place, Art, Small
1998 International Quilt Festival in Houston

Ricky Tims Web site

This quilt is machine pieced from hand-dyed fabrics and includes appliqué outlined with machine couching techniques. It was machine quilted entirely from the back side with hand-dyed threads.

Ricky has been quilting since June of 1991 and has designed and completed numerous art quilts, many of which have been exhibited in local and national shows. He teaches a variety of workshops and has become known in particular for his multimedia presentations which include slides of quilts and live piano music.

"The quilt is improvisationally pieced, which means I literally cut the fabrics without pre-planning necessarily seam allowances, templates or so forth," Ricky explains. "But the central figure is a pink flower with a lime green stem. That's the center of the quilt, and it has concentric borders going around it. The first border has squares, but they're sort of dancing at angles around that, and then the final border has spirals and scrolls and hand-dyed fabrics that go all around the surface of the quilt as well.

"It's all hand-dyed and it's quilted with hand-dyed threads, but I also quilt it with Madeira Glamour Thread which is a very heavy thread. The only way to actually use that thread is to put it in the bobbin of the machine. So I have to quilt the quilt from the back side in order for the bobbin thread to attach to the front of the quilt. It's kind of an interesting technique and it sparkles," he adds.

"I approach quilting as an artist," Ricky explains, "but I'm also very fond of traditional quilts. I don't make them as readily as I used to, but I'm very fond of them, and so I think people would look at my work and say, 'he's an artist'."