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community guide

Community has helped shape the creative processes of our collective craft history.  Craft forms are passed from generation to generation in necessity and survival, but also in the spirit of community and commonality.  This educational guide delves into the rich community of craft in order to provide educators with material that will relate to and reflect the core ideas, artists, and art forms presented in the Community episode.


Matt Kelleher and Shoko Teruyama, both resident artists at Penland School of Crafts, speak about their time at the school and their work.


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Penland instructor Amy Putansu demonstrating a weaving technique Quilts sewn by MCC quilters Huckleberry Picking 1935

Penland instructor Amy Putansu demonstrating a weaving technique.

Quilts sewn by MCC quilters.

Slockish Family Huckleberry Picking near Mt. Adams, Washington, 1935.  USDA Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot National Forest, Used With Permission, Ray M. Filloon Photograph.


show me

Craft forms known to us to today would not exist if it were not for the artists. For thousands of years they have carried on traditions; some remain true to long established practice while others add their own twist. In this section of Educator Guide: Community, students will learn that artists such as Mary Jackson and instructors at craft schools like Penland School of Craft have an innate desire to share what they have learned. Artists and schools like these function with the understanding that in order for craft traditions to exist in the future, they must share what they know. They must teach others.

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Download the Show Me Lesson Guide in PDF format HERE to see get started in your classroom.

hand in hand

While some craft artists find working hand in hand with others challenging, for some it is both a necessity and a pleasure. The artists at Pilchuck School of Glass and the quilters at Mississippi Cultural Crossroads could work alone if they wished; however, both prefer to work in collaboration with others. In this section of Educator Guide: Community, students will learn the importance of collaboration among craft artists. Collaborative artists know that by working hand in hand with others they can create beautiful hand crafted objects that realize a common goal and reflect a shared vision, imbued with the spirit of collaboration.

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Download the Hand in Hand Lesson Guide in PDF format HERE to see get started in your classroom.

continuity and change

All craft artists work within a tradition. It is impossible for them to separate themselves from the deeply rooted traditions of the past or the craft artists who have come before them. However, every generation of craft artist seeks to push boundaries; change the art form in his or her own way. In this section of Educator Guide: Community, students will deepen their knowledge and understanding of continuity and change as seen through the work of Richard Notkin, and Einar and Jamex de la Torre. These artists push the limits of their materials and subject matter, but do so within the longstanding traditions of craft.

download

Download the Continuity and Change Lesson Guide in PDF format HERE to see get started in your classroom.


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