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Jason Judd (56k)  (220k)

 

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Factory Worker (56k)  (220k)

 

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Garment Worker Garment factory strikes occur almost daily in Phnom Phen, the capitol of Cambodia. Workers complain of forced and unpaid overtime, discrimination against union leaders and paltry wages.

The nation's fledgling labor rights movement received a major morale boost in late 1998 when the United States and Cambodia reached a historic trade agreement. Cambodia could increase its garment exports to the U.S. if the government showed progress in enforcing its labor laws and abiding by international labor standards. As part of the agreement, the International Labor Organization set up an independent monitoring program to review factory conditions and publish their findings.

Garment Workers American Jason Judd is among the international observers who moved to Cambodia to make a difference during this crucial period in its industrialization. Today, at age 29, he runs the AFL-CIO's Solidarity Center in Phnom Phen, where he educates Cambodian workers about their rights and trains them to form strong, independent labor unions. In "Planet Work 1," Livelyhood meets Jason and his Cambodian colleagues as they strive to make a difference in global working conditions.

Jason Judd - Labor Organizer "What happens here in this part of the world in the next ten years is important for the rest of the world," explains Jason, who has also organized garbage workers in New Orleans and congregations in South Texas. "The work is coming here. The money is coming here. That means the power is coming here. And if the workers don't have any, they're going to suffer mightily."

More unions with U.S. hands across the water

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