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Viewing Guide Section 1
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Viewing Guide Section 2
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VIEWING GUIDES  

(For information on ordering a video copy of the Livelyhood "Planet Work" contact The Working Group at 510-268-WORK or email info@livelyhoodtv.org)

Use these tips to prepare your students to view the program thoughtfully:

Read the summary of the show to familiarize yourself with its contents.

Ask these questions to begin a discussion of the different kinds of jobs that help the world run better.

When you think of making the world a better place, what kinds of jobs do you think of?

What kinds of problems exist in the world that need solutions?

What companies or organizations do you know of that try to solve the problems of the world?

Inform students that as they view the program, they will encounter people who try to make things work better in the world. You might suggest that students keep the following questions in mind as they view the episode:

Who benefits from increasing globalization? How? Who suffers as the result of this process? How?

What have people done to try to improve inadequate conditions? What do you think motivates them to do these things?

Is the ability to make a difference dependent on the profession you are in?

While Viewing

"Planet Work" presents the following segments:

[00:00][03:07]
Introduction

Will Durst introduces the issues of job opportunity, overseas investment, and equitable distribution of wealth as he prepares to zigzag the globe in search of those who work to make a difference in the world.

[03:07][06.28]
Segment 1

Provo, UT - Will visits Jim and Prasad, who are project partners at Novell. Although Jim works in Provo, Utah, and Prasad lives in Bangalore, India, the two employees participate in a global work-sharing program that allows them to develop products for Novell 24 hours a day.

[06.28][10.36]
Segment 2

New York, NY - The Livelycam talks to people at the United Nations, who work to achieve global equality through education.

[10:36][14.18]
Segment 3

Accra, Ghana - Akwezi Aghi's mission is to provide Ghanaian students with access to computers. With the help of Tim Harris, a Geekcorps volunteer, Akwezi visits high schools throughout the country to figure out how to connect them to the Internet. He is motivated by the students he meets and is eager for them to communicate with and contribute to the world.

[14.18][17.08]
Segment 4

Seattle, WA - Will travels to the WTO meetings to learn about the effects of globalization. He explains how delegates decide on issues of international trade policy that affect workers worldwide. He meets with protestors who complain about the closed-door policy of the WTO sessions. Union representatives discuss how WTO agreements have resulted in the loss of jobs and a decline in labor standards.

[17.08][19.24]
Segment 5

Maine - Jim Davis, president of New Balance, has decided to continue producing a portion of his company's athletic shoes in the United States. Unlike his competitors, who moved their factories overseas in order to reap greater profits, Jim believes that by maintaining his New England operations, he has a competitive edge. The company can make style changes and fill orders more quickly because of its New England factories. The state-of-the-art machines and the employees' team approach help to increase productivity at New Balance.

[19:55][25:40]
Segment 6

Seattle, WA - Gourmet chef Tom French discovers that salmon in Siberia is being discarded and decides to make a difference by putting the fish to good use. He processes the salmon and sells it to chefs in the U.S. via the Internet in order to fund a community bakery that will help support shelters and orphanages in Siberia.

[25:40][30:27]
Segment 7

Will looks at how issues of foreign trade used to be explained to students through film and gives his own explanation of the more recent Banana Wars that involved Dole, Chiquita, and the European Union.

[33:01][36:34]
Segment 8

Waterbury, VT - Will meets with Rick and Deborah from Green Mountain Coffee to find out about the coffee bean market. He learns that coffee prices have dropped to record lows, forcing many coffee growers to sell their harvests at prices well below the cost of production. In order for small farmers to survive, companies like Green Mountain Coffee have created a market called fair trade coffee, through which farmers receive a fair price for their coffee beans. Green Mountain Coffee has made this line of fair trade coffee products available to consumers in the U.S.

[37:51][40:56]
Segment 9
Phnom Penh, Cambodia - Trade agreements have brought American garment factories to Cambodia, creating new jobs for many Cambodians. Garment workers receive low wages however, and they must work long hours under poor conditions. Jason Judd feels that these workers are being treated unfairly and has moved from Texas to Phnom Penh to educate workers about building unions. His workshops empower Cambodians to organize themselves and protest against injustices at work.

[53:57][55:30]
Conclusion

 

Pause once or twice while viewing to have students reflect on what they've seen.Ask:

What kinds of problems do some multinational corporations create in their search for greater profits?

How might a consumer contribute to the problem of substandard treatment of foreign workers?

What creative ways are individuals able to make a difference in the world?

Ask whether students are confused about anything they've seen. Offer them the opportunity to visit the Livelyhood Website and skim the summary of "Planet Work" after watching the program.

Also encourage students to list terms they're unfamiliar with, and look them up in the Glossary for People Who Work, or Know Someone Who Does, located in Livelyhood's Digital Tool Kit.

After Viewing

A variety of resources is available for linking the content of the show to particular curriculum areas, and helping students apply the content to real-world situations relevant to their own lives.

 

1.Follow-up Questions. These encourage students to analyze and think critically about the situations and issues presented in the show.

You might begin by having students consider again and respond to these questions:

Who benefits from increasing globalization? How? Who suffers as the result of this process? How?

What have people done to try to improve inadequate conditions? What do you think motivates them to do these things?

Is the ability to make a difference dependent on the profession you are in?

Continue by asking questions that will lead students to relate the content of the program to their own lives.

What people or organizations in the United States try to ensure that American workers are treated fairly?

Do you know anyone who works long hours, is underpaid, or works under poor conditions? Why do they do this?

What are some things you could do to improve conditions in your community?

To give students opportunities to explore these issues actively and creatively, assign one or more of the cross-curricular activities that follow.

 

2.Cross-Curricular Activities Some of these activities utilize other features of the Livelyhood Website, such as the Lively Poll and the Posting Areas. All activities are appropriate for students in grades 9-12. Some are suitable for younger students as well; others are appropriate for adult students.

 

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