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Quiz
Campaign Knowledge
Long-time political campaign researcher Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center and author of The 2000 Presidential Election and the Foundations of Party Politics, has found that many Americans have misconceptions about politics, campaigns and the press. See if you are entering the final rounds of the 2004 election with false assumptions by taking the quiz below, drawn from Jamieson's EVERYTHING YOU THINK YOU KNOW ABOUT POLITICS...AND WHY YOU'RE WRONG.

The quality of presidential general-election campaigns has steadily worsened over the years.
True

False


Most political ads lie most of the time.
True

False


Campaign discourse in speeches and debates has become steadily more negative over the years.
True

False


Reporters pretty accurately represent the content and level of attack in their stories about candidate speeches.
True

False


Voters prefer ads that contrast the records of the candidates to ads that simply attack.
True

False


Attack turns off voters. The high level of attack in the general-election presidential campaign of 1996 was a main reason that voter turnout was down.
True

False


Attack benefits the sponsor and hurts the person attacked.
True

False


The person who is ahead in the polls gets more strategic coverage than the underdog.
True

False


THE NEW YORK TIMES gave Dole less coverage in 1996 than Clinton.
True

False


Women know less than men about politics.
True

False

Adapted from EVERYTHING YOU THINK YOU KNOW ABOUT POLITICS AND WHY YOU'RE WRONG, by Kathleen Hall Jamieson. Permission to reproduce kindly granted by Basic Books.




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