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Step 3- Get Good Grades in Tough Courses
Strong performance in a demanding high school curriculum is the key factor in successful college admissions. In Step Three, we discuss colleges' emphasis on a studentís transcript in reviewing that student in the admissions process.

It is clear that every selective college places the most weight on a studentís choice of courses during high school, and a studentís grades in those courses, when trying to predict a studentís likely success in that particular college. Colleges like to see students stretch themselves academically through their senior year. Students can demonstrate their areas of interest and strength through their curricular choices.

We present the ideal high school course plan for students, and encourage students to go beyond their high schoolís graduation requirements to fulfill selective college entrance requirements. Students learn about how to supplement their high school curriculum outside of school, and that it is not too late to improve their academic record.

Step Three is essential, and is often overlooked or forgotten by parents and students distracted by the prevailing admission mythologies of the day, or the strategizing that seems to dominate much of the discussion of college entrance. The fact is that mastery of a demanding high school program is the cornerstone of any admission application. Good grades in tough courses will ensure good choices.

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Ideal High School Curriculum (printable .pdf)

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Daniel Saracino
HS GRADES AND COLLEGE
Daniel Saracino, Assistant Provost for Enrollment at the University of Notre Dame comments on the importance of the High School Transcript.
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