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Clematis

Best bets for growing clematis in your garden

Clematis are not as difficult to grow as many gardeners believe. There are many different types, from herbaceous vines to shade-loving ground covers, so it's simply a matter of choosing the correct clematis for the correct location. Michael Weishan visited Completely Clematis in Ipswich, Massachusetts, where owner Sue Austin grows over 200 varieties.

clematis

Clematis viticella

'Betty Corning'

Like most clematis, 'Betty Corning' is a vine. One of the most vigorous clematis hybrids, it requires very little maintenance. It has a long flowering season — its fragrant blossoms are in bloom from May through September.

clematis

Clematis

'Arabella'

'Arabella' is great as an ornamental plant. It loves to grow contained in a pot and cascades nicely over the sides. It grows to a height of 6 feet and is almost always in bloom.

clematis

Clematis viticella

'Alba Luxurians'

'Alba Luxurians' is another vine clematis and does best when growing up and into a shrub. It is late-flowering, blooming from mid-summer to late fall. When grown through a shrub, 'Alba Luxurians' is better protected from disease and clematis wilt, a condition characterized by the complete collapse of either the entire plant or just one of the shoots.

clematis

Clematis

'Mrs. Robert Brydon'

If you want a clematis that acts as a ground cover, 'Mrs. Robert Brydon' is an excellent choice. With branches that grow out to about 6 to 8 feet, it requires almost no maintenance and inhibits weed growth. It blooms for about one and a half to two months, depending on sun exposure. In shady areas, its blooms tend to last longer and are more intense in color.


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This segment appears in show #2820.

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Published August 31, 2007