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Live map: Track Hurricane Florence as it heads for the East Coast

Update: Sept. 13, 6:58 a.m. ET

Overnight, Hurricane Florence’s winds continued to decline. However, its rain and storm surge forecasts remain unchanged. The outer bands of its tropical storm-force winds are now reaching shore.

Florence’s winds dropped by 20 miles per hour in 24 hours because it encountered a patch of wind shear — a shift in wind direction at high altitude. This shear will decline just as the storm encounters warmer waters near the coast, but forecasters expect the storm to maintain its current strength until landfall.

Elsewhere, tropical storm Isaac is hitting the Lesser Antilles on Thursday, while a storm in the Gulf of Mexico threatens to become a tropical depression and bring heavy rains to Mexico, Texas and Louisiana. In the Pacific, Hawaii is recovering from tropical storm Olivia, and the largest typhoon of the year — Super Typhoon Mangkhut — is approaching the northern Philippines with 150-mile-per-hour winds.

Hurricane Florence is located 320 miles southeast of North Carolina’s coast and advancing at a speed of 15 miles per hour. Governors in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia have declared states of emergency, and President Donald Trump has authorized federal funding and resources to assist with preparation for the storm. Georgia and Maryland’s governors, along with the mayor of Washington, D.C., have issued emergency declarations of their own. More than 10 million people may be affected by Florence due to its immense size.

Here’s what to expect from Florence and when to expect it, based on the latest forecasts from the National Hurricane Center and other sources.

Arrival: Meteorologists released more details on how the storm might move after landfall. Florence is still expected to make landfall Friday near Wilmington, North Carolina. Its predicted path will then push into South Carolina and then turn northward into western North Carolina, Tennessee, western Virginia, Kentucky and West Virginia.

Tropical storm-force winds (greater than 39 miles per hour) have started to arrive in the Carolinas.

Winds: Florence is currently a Category 2 storm with maximum sustained winds of 110 miles per hour. Its winds extend 195 miles from center. This storm is big.

Storm Surge: Storm surge predictions remain unchanged, despite the weakening winds. The current track means the worst of the storm surge will likely hit Wilmington, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and the surrounding areas. Storm surge may be more than 9 feet in these areas, according to ADCIRC, a computer model developed over 30 years by the University of North Carolina, University of Notre Dame and University of Texas. The storm surge may spread several miles inland along Cape Fear River.

Anywhere from 4 to 6 feet of storm surge may now occur as far south as Savannah, Georgia, and as far north as Greenville, North Carolina.

Rainfall: The rain forecast has changed slightly for inland areas. As the storm encounters the highlands in these states, it will likely increase its rate of precipitation. The National Hurricane Center now predicts 6 to 12 inches with 24 inches in isolated areas from South Carolina to southwest Virginia..

The coast will bear the brunt of Florence’s rains. The National Hurricane Center predicts 20 to 30 inches of rain for coastal North Carolina, with 40 inches in places.

The change in track means more rain for the mid-Atlantic areas extending from Washington, D.C. to New York City. Those places could still see 6 inches of rain along with flooding.

Flash flooding and river flooding is also expected in all of these regions. Tornadoes may also occur in North Carolina.

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Update: Sept. 12, 5:46 p.m. ET.

By late afternoon on Wednesday, Hurricane Florence had lost additional strength, but grown in size with winds extending 195 miles from its center. Florence will fluctuate in strength between now and Friday, when it is expected hit land. More than 10 million people live in areas currently under storm warnings and watches..

Plus, an emerging storm in the Gulf of Mexico now has a 70 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone within the next 48 hours. It is heading toward Texas.

Hurricane Florence is located 380 miles southeast of North Carolina’s coast and advancing at a speed of 16 miles per hour. Governors in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia have declared states of emergency, and President Donald Trump has authorized federal funding and resources to assist with preparation for the storm. Georgia and Maryland’s governors, along with the mayor of Washington, D.C., have issued emergency declarations of their own. Evacuation orders have been issued to more than 1.5 million people.

Here’s what to expect from Florence and when to expect it, based on the latest forecasts from the National Hurricane Center and other sources.

Arrival: The storm track continues to shift slightly south, but Florence’s landfall is still expected Friday near Wilmington, North Carolina. Its predicted path will then push into South Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee.

Reminder: Tropical storm-force winds (greater than 39 miles per hour) should arrive more than 12 hours earlier than landfall — between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m. Friday.

Winds: Florence is currently a Category 3 storm with maximum sustained winds of 120 miles per hour. But the storm will pass through a batch of extremely warm waters on Wednesday, so its strength should fluctuate over the next 24 hours.

The storm may weaken slightly before making landfall, but it could still hit land as a Category 4 or strong Category 3 storm.

Storm Surge: The slight shift in track means the worst of the storm surge will likely hit Wilmington, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and the surrounding areas. Storm surge may be more than 9 feet in these areas, according to ADCIRC, a computer model developed over 30 years by the University of North Carolina, University of Notre Dame and University of Texas. The storm surge may spread several miles inland along Cape Fear River.

Anywhere from 4 to 6 feet of storm surge may now occur as far south as Savannah, Georgia, and as far north as Greenville, North Carolina.

Rainfall: Based on current projections, the storm will slow down significantly right as it reaches North Carolina’s Coast. The location of this slowdown could be consequential.

If the storm slows down far enough offshore, it can churn up cooler water and weaken itself, said Philip Klotzbach, an atmospheric scientist at Colorado State University. However, if the slowdown happens close to shore, it may be too late.

Florence’s rains may present an outsized risk to coastal and inland communities in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee and western Virginia. The change in track means less rain for the mid-Atlantic areas like Washington, D.C., and Maryland, but those places could still see up to 12 inches of rain along with flooding.

As the storm encounters the highlands in these states, it will likely increase its rate of precipitation. The storm’s pace will likely slow after landfall, which could create a stalling effect and further add to rainfall totals.

The National Hurricane Center increased its predictions for rainfall this morning. It now predicts 20 to 30 inches of rain for coastal North Carolina, with 40 inches in places. South Carolina could see 5 to 10 inches on average, and up to 20 inches in certain locations.

Flash flooding and river flooding is also expected in all of these regions. Tornadoes may also occur in North Carolina.

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Update Sept. 12, 3:30 p.m. ET

By Wednesday afternoon, Hurricane Florence had lost a bit of strength but remained large, with winds extending 175 miles from its center. Florence will fluctuate in strength between now and Friday, when it is expected hit land, but its chances of becoming a Category 5 have diminished. No Category 5 storm has ever made landfall in this section of the Southeast coast.

Meanwhile, an emerging storm in the Gulf of Mexico now has a 70 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone within the next 48 hours. It is heading toward Texas.

Hurricane Florence is located 451 miles southeast of North Carolina’s coast and advancing at a speed of 16 miles per hour. Governors in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia have declared states of emergency, and President Donald Trump has authorized federal funding and resources to assist with preparation for the storm. Georgia and Maryland’s governors, along with the mayor of Washington, D.C., have issued emergency declarations of their own. Evacuation orders have been issued to more than 1.5 million people.

Here’s what to expect from Florence and when to expect it, based on the latest forecasts from the National Hurricane Center and other sources.

Arrival: The storm track continues to shift slightly south, but Florence’s landfall is still expected Friday near Wilmington, North Carolina. Its predicted path will then push into South Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee.

Reminder: Tropical storm-force winds (greater than 39 miles per hour) should arrive more than 12 hours earlier than landfall — between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m. Friday.

Winds: Florence is currently a Category 3 storm with maximum sustained winds of 125 miles per hour. But the storm will pass through a batch of extremely warm waters on Wednesday, so its strength should fluctuate over the next 24 hours.

The storm may weaken slightly before making landfall, but it could still hit land as a Category 4 or strong Category 3 storm.

Storm Surge: The slight shift in track means the worst of the storm surge will likely hit Wilmington, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and the surrounding areas. Earlier predictions had the focus of the storm surge farther north, near the city of New Bern. Storm surge may be more than 9 feet in these areas, according to ADCIRC, a computer model developed over 30 years by the University of North Carolina, University of Notre Dame and University of Texas. The storm surge may spread several miles inland along Cape Fear River.

Anywhere from 4 to 6 feet of storm surge may now occur as far south as Savannah, Georgia, and as far north as Greenville, North Carolina.

Rainfall: Based on current projections, the storm will slow down significantly right as it reaches North Carolina’s Coast. The location of this slowdown could be consequential.

If the storm slows down far enough offshore, it can churn up cooler water and weaken itself, said Philip Klotzbach, an atmospheric scientist at Colorado State University. However, if the slowdown happens close to shore, it may be too late.

Florence’s rains may present an outsized risk to coastal and inland communities in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee and western Virginia. The change in track means less rain for the mid-Atlantic areas like Washington, D.C., and Maryland, but those places could still see up to 12 inches of rain along with flooding.

As the storm encounters the highlands in these states, it will likely increase its rate of precipitation. The storm’s pace will likely slow after landfall, which could create a stalling effect and further add to rainfall totals.

The National Hurricane Center increased its predictions for rainfall this morning. It now predicts 20 to 30 inches of rain for coastal North Carolina, with 40 inches in places. South Carolina could see 5 to 10 inches on average, and up to 20 inches in certain locations.

Flash flooding and river flooding is also expected in all of these regions. Tornadoes may also occur in North Carolina.

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Update: Sept. 12, 8:50 a.m. ET.

On Wednesday, Hurricane Florence stands poised to become the northernmost Category 5 hurricane in history, according to Weather Underground meteorologist Bob Henson.

The storm is located 850 miles southeast of North Carolina’s coast, and advancing at a speed of 17 miles per hour. Governors in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia have declared states of emergency, and President Donald Trump has authorized federal funding and resources to assist with preparation for the storm. Maryland’s governor, along with the mayor of Washington, D.C., have issued emergency declarations of their own. Evacuation orders have been issued to more than 1.5 million people.

Here’s what to expect from Florence and when to expect it, based on the latest forecasts from the National Hurricane Center and other sources.

Arrival: The storm track has changed. Florence’s landfall is now expected Friday morning. Its predicted path has turned slightly south and west, meaning the storm could make landfall at Wilmington and then push into South Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee.

Reminder: Tropical storm-force winds (greater than 39 miles per hour) should arrive more than 12 hours earlier — between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m. That’s because Florence is a giant storm, with winds extending 175 miles from its center.

Winds: Florence is currently a Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of 130 miles per hour. But the storm will pass through a batch of extremely warm waters on Wednesday, which could rapidly intensify the storm into a Category 5.

The storm may weaken slightly before making landfall, but it could still hit land as a Category 4 or strong Category 3 storm.

Storm Surge: The slight shift in track means the worst of the storm surge will likely hit Wilmington and its surrounding areas. Earlier predictions had the focus of the storm surge further north, near the city of New Bern. Storm surge may be more than 9 feet in these areas, according to ADCIRC, a computer model developed over 30 years by the University of Notre Dame and University of Texas. The storm surge may spread several miles inland along Cape Fear River.

Maximum water heights caused by Hurricane Florence’s storm surge as predicted by the ADCIRC computer model. Projections as of 11:00am EST on September 11, 2018.

Maximum water heights caused by Hurricane Florence’s storm surge as predicted by the ADCIRC computer model. Projections as of 11:00 a.m. ET on September 11, 2018.

Anywhere from 4 to 6 feet of storm surge may now occur as far south as Charleston, South Carolina and as far north as the Virginia coast.

Rainfall: Based on current projections, the storm will slow down significantly right as it reaches the Carolina Coast. The location of this slowdown could be consequential.

If the storm slows down far enough offshore, it can churn up cooler water and weaken itself, Philip Klotzbach, an atmospheric scientist at Colorado State University, told the PBS NewsHour. However, if the slowdown happens to close to shore, it may be too late.

Florence’s rains may present an outsized risk to coastal and inland communities in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee and western Virginia. The change in track means less rain for the mid-Atlantic areas like Washington D.C. and Maryland, but they could still witness up to 12 inches in places and experience flooding.

As the storm encounters the highlands in these states, it will likely increase its rate of precipitation. The storm’s pace will likely slow after landfall, which could create a stalling effect and further add to rainfall totals.

The National Hurricane Center has increased its predictions for rainfall to worrying degrees. The center now expected 20 to 30 inches of rain for coastal North Carolina, with 40 inches in places. South Carolina could see 5 to 10 inches on average and up to 20 inches.

Flash flooding and river flooding is also expected in all of these regions.

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Updated Sept. 11, 2:13 p.m. ET

Hurricane Florence appears ready to churn through the Carolinas, bringing along massive winds, rainfall and flooding.

As of Tuesday morning, the storm is located 900 miles southeast of North Carolina’s coast, and advancing at a relatively rapid speed of 16 miles per hour. Governors in North and South Carolina have declared states of emergency, and President Donald Trump has authorized federal funding and resources to assist with preparation for the storm. Virginia and Maryland’s governors, along with the mayor of Washington, D.C., have issued emergency declarations of their own.

READ MORE: How Hurricane Florence could cause unprecedented damage to the Carolinas

Here’s what to expect from Florence and when to expect it, based on the latest forecasts from the National Hurricane Center and other sources.

Arrival: Florence’s landfall is expected late Thursday night or Friday morning. The storm’s track is currently heading toward the North Carolina city of Jacksonville, about 50 miles north of Wilmington.

But tropical storm-force winds (greater than 39 miles per hour) should arrive more than 12 hours earlier — around sunrise on Thursday. That’s because Florence is a giant storm, with winds extending 150 miles from its center.

Winds: Florence is currently a Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of 130 miles per hour. Florence doubled its wind speed from Sunday to Monday, and the National Hurricane Center expects the storm to strengthen again on Tuesday.

The storm may weaken slightly before making landfall, but it could still hit land as a Category 4 or strong Category 3 storm.

Storm Surge: While the eye of Florence may make landfall along the south or middle of North Carolina’s coast, the worst of the storm surge may occur further north, near the city of New Bern. Storm surge may be more than 10 feet in these areas, according to ADCIRC, a computer model developed over 30 years by the University of North Carolina, University of Notre Dame and University of Texas. In these areas, storm surge may spread several miles inland along the Neuse and Pamlico Rivers, extending to Greenville, North Carolina.

Anywhere from 2 to 6 feet of storm surge may occur in other areas — as far south as Charleston, South Carolina and as far north as the Virginia coast.

Rainfall: Florence’s rains may present an outsized risk to coastal and inland communities in South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and Maryland. As the storm encounters the highlands of North Carolina and Virginia, it will likely increase its rate of precipitation. The storm’s pace will likely slow after landfall, which could create a stalling effect and further add to rainfall totals.

The National Hurricane Center predicts a total of 15 to 20 inches of rain in parts of the Carolinas and Mid-Atlantic states from Thursday to early next week. Flash flooding and river flooding is also expected in these regions.

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