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News Wrap: 4 Marines killed by gunman targeting Tennessee military sites

In our news wrap Thursday, a gunman attacked two military sites in Chattanooga, Tennessee, within minutes. Four U.S. Marines were killed, and the gunman was killed by police. The U.S. attorney for Eastern Tennessee said they are treating the attacks as an act of domestic terrorism. Also, a trial date was set for the man accused of the mass killing at a church in Charleston, South Carolina.

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  • GWEN IFILL:

    Once again, members of the U.S. military have been killed in a barrage of gunfire at their workplaces on home soil. The targets today were in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

  • It happened just after mid-morning:

    A car stopped and a man started shooting at a pair of military sites.

  • WOMAN:

    He just pulled up, and I didn’t think anything of it. And the next thing you know, he lifted up his arms like this with a big black gun. And just there was one shot and then it was just endless shots, one after another.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The first target was a military recruiting center. Dozens of shots were fired from a car, but no one was hurt. Then, minutes later, the gunman opened fire at a Navy Reserve center about seven miles away.

    Four U.S. Marines were killed there, sparking a gunfight with police. The shooter was killed, and a police officer and others were wounded.

    Chattanooga Mayor Andy Berke called it a nightmare.

  • MAYOR ANDY BERKE Chattanooga, Tennessee:

    It is incomprehensible to see what happened and the way that individuals who proudly serve our country were treated. Two different locations, this individual went to. And as a city, we will respond to this with every available resource that we have.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The FBI identified the gunman as Muhammed Yousef Abdul Aziz, a native of Kuwait, and police began searching his home near Chattanooga.

    The U.S. attorney for Eastern Tennessee said officials are treating the attacks as — quote — “an act of domestic terrorism.”

    A short time ago, President Obama said the attack appeared to be the work of a lone gunman and he promised a thorough investigation. This was just the latest shooting, mass shooting at a U.S. military site. In 2009, an Army officer killed 13 people at Fort Hood, Texas. And in 2013, a former Navy Reservist killed 12 at the Washington, D.C., Navy Yard.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The man accused in the mass killings in Charleston, South Carolina, Dylann Roof, will go on trial on July 11 of next year. A judge set the date at a hearing today, as the 21-year-old Roof sat quietly in the courtroom. He’s accused of murdering nine people at a black church last month.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    The Iran nuclear deal brought a cautious response from Saudi Arabia today, and a warning. The Saudi foreign minister met in Washington with Secretary of State John Kerry. He stopped short of endorsing the Iran accord. Instead, he said this:

  • ADEL AL-JUBEIR, Foreign Minister, Saudi Arabia:

    We hope that the Iranians, if a deal is implemented, that the Iranians will use this deal in order to improve the economic situation in Iran and to improve the lot of the Iranian people, and not use it for adventures in the region. And we are committed that, if Iran should try to cause mischief in the region, we’re committed to confront it resolutely.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Kerry promised the U.S. will help defend its Arab allies against any trouble caused by Iran.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    In Japan, the Lower House of Parliament voted today to let Japanese troops fight overseas if needed for the first time since World War II. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said it’s necessary as a counter to China’s growing power. Opposition lawmakers boycotted the session. The vote followed an overnight protest by thousands of people against the legislation.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    U.N. human rights investigators are demanding China end a crackdown on lawyers. They said today more than 100 people have disappeared or been detained in the past week. Most were representing political dissidents, journalists and artists. It’s part of an intensifying government campaign to tighten control over the country.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The wheels were set in motion today for Europe to open a new financial lifeline to Greece. The Greek Parliament voted in the middle of the night to adopt new austerity measures. Hours later, the European Central Bank announced new funding for Greek banks, despite questions about Athens’ follow-through.

  • MARIO DRAGHI, President, European Central Bank:

    There are, I would say, questions about the implementation, will and capacity. It will be really in the Greek government capacity to respond with policy decisions, with actions that would dispel these doubts.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Meanwhile, European finance ministers approved short-term loans of more than $7.5 billion to keep Greece afloat. And the Greek government said that banks there will reopen Monday.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Back in this country, Republican presidential candidate and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker won a key legal victory. The Wisconsin Supreme Court today ended an investigation into his 2012 recall campaign. At issue was whether Walker’s effort illegally coordinated with conservative groups. The court ruled state election law was vague, and called the investigation unjust.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Former President George H.W. Bush was in fair condition today after breaking a bone in his neck. He fell yesterday at his summer home in Kennebunkport, Maine. And he spent the night at a hospital in Portland, where doctors said today he’s doing well.

  • DR. WILLIAM F. D’ANGELO, Neurosurgeon, Maine Medical Center:

    The president never lost consciousness, and the injury he sustained neither impinged on his spinal chord, nor resulted in any neurologic deficit. He continues to have normal use of his limbs. The plan is to let this injury heal on its own without surgery.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    Mr. Bush will remain at the hospital for now, and will have to wear a neck brace for some time. At 91, he is the oldest living former president.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    A bill to overhaul the No Child Left Behind act cleared the Senate today with bipartisan support. It would give the states and school districts more control over teacher and student assessments, as well as academic standards. The Senate bill still has to be reconciled with a House version that goes even farther.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    The Obama administration is calling for new measures to protect streams near coal mines. Proposed rules today would clarify and update guidelines for restoring streams and mined areas after the mining ends. Officials say the goal is to modernize practices and make them more consistent across the industry.

  • GWEN IFILL:

    Wall Street had a good today, boosted by upbeat corporate earnings and progress on the Greek bailout. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 70 points to close at 18120. The Nasdaq finished at a record high, rising 64 points to 5163. And the S&P 500 added nearly 17.

  • JUDY WOODRUFF:

    And this was the 70th anniversary of the Trinity test. That is the first atomic bomb blast. The U.S. government detonated the device on July 16, 1945, near Los Alamos, New Mexico. An enormous mushroom cloud rose some 38,000 feet into the sky, raining ash and radioactive debris. The next month, the U.S. military dropped two atomic bombs on Japan, helping to end World War II.

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