News Wrap: Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas remains hospitalized with an infection

In our news wrap Monday, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas remains hospitalized in Washington with an infection, the U.S. declared atrocities against Rohingya Muslims in Buddhist Myanmar is genocide, Arkansas investigators are probing a mass shooting that left one man dead and 27 wounded, and the longest-serving Republican ever in the House of Representatives will lie in state at the Capitol.

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  • Judy Woodruff:

    In the day's other news: U.S. Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson opened her Senate confirmation hearings with a pledge to act without fear or favor. The federal appeals judge would be the first Black woman on the High Court.

    Democrats praised her in opening statements. Republicans promised tough questions about her views. We will get all the details later in the program.

    Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas remains hospitalized in Washington tonight with an infection. The court says he was admitted Friday with flu-like symptoms, but does not have COVID. It also says that his symptoms are easing. Thomas is 73 years old.

    In Southern China, search teams worked into the night after a domestic flight crashed with 132 people on board and no signs of survivors. The Boeing 737-800 was flying from Kunming to Guangzhou, when it dove to earth in 96 seconds. Hundreds of rescuers were sent to a scene of widely scattered wreckage. It was China's deadliest aviation disaster in nearly a decade.

    We will return to this later in the program.

    China's Shanghai Disneyland temporarily closed today, as a COVID outbreak grows. The huge port in the city of 24 million people remained open. Meanwhile, Hong Kong and the finance and tech center of Shenzhen began easing pandemic restrictions.

    The United States has declared that atrocities against Rohingya Muslims in Buddhist Myanmar are genocide. More than 700,000 Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh since 2017.

    Secretary of State Antony Blinken made today's announcement at the U.S. Holocaust Museum

    Antony Blinken, U.S. Secretary of State: The path is a familiar one, mirroring in so many ways the path to the Holocaust and other genocides. We see parallels in the dehumanizing hate speech. Rohingya were compared to fleas, to thorns, to an invasive species, just as Tutsis were compared to cockroaches, and Jews to rats and parasites.

  • Judy Woodruff:

    The U.S. move could prompt other nations to pressure Myanmar's military government.

    Investigators in Southeast Arkansas are working to solve a mass shooting that left one man dead and 27 wounded. It happened Saturday, when a gunfight erupted at a car show in Dumas, 90 miles outside Little Rock. One person was being questioned.

    And, in Texas, three separate weekend mass shootings left one person dead and 17 wounded.

    More than 3,000 Canadian Pacific railroad workers were on strike today after a contract deadline expired. The walkout threatened economic disruptions in the U.S. Midwest. Canadian Pacific is a major shipper of fertilizer into the region. It also carries American grain into Canada.

    Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell has issued fresh warnings that the Central Bank will act forcefully to tame inflation. He said today that interest rate hikes could be half-a-point, instead of the usual quarter-point.

    Wall Street gave ground after Powell's remarks. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 202 points to close at 34553. The Nasdaq fell 55 points. The S&P 500 slipped two.

    And the longest serving Republican ever in the U.S. House of Representatives will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol tomorrow. Alaska Congressman Don Young died Friday after serving for 49 years. He steered major federal spending to Alaska, but also faced several investigations. Don Young was 88 years old.

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