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People across the world rally for women’s rights

One day after President Donald Trump was inaugurated, thousands of people joined the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., and other demonstrations around the world to advocate for reproductive, immigration, racial equality and worker’s rights. The NewsHour Weekend’s Ivette Feliciano reports from the main event in D.C.

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  • IVETTE FELICIANO, PBS NEWSHOUR CORRESPONDENT:

    The first marchers began arriving near the Capitol building before dawn. There were women and men of all ages from all over the country, a mix of ethnic, religious, and class backgrounds. Among the many first-time demonstrators was Janet Chen (ph), who brought her eight-year-old daughter, Molly. They're worried about the Republican rollback of Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare.

  • MOLLY CHEN, EIGHT-YEAR-OLD:

    I have a heart defect, and I want to get health insurance when I'm older, but I might not be able to.

  • JANET CHEN, DEMONSTRATOR:

    I think it's important that the next generation of little girls stand up for women's rights and realize there's a real threat to women's rights in this country right now with the incoming administration.

  • IVETTE FELICIANO:

    Debbie Snowdon (ph) came from North Carolina to support abortion rights and funding for Planned Parenthood.

  • DEBBIE SNOWDON, DEMONSTRATOR:

    It's really important to me that they're going to probably reverse Roe v. Wade, take away abortion rights in this country. I'm very concerned. I'm at an age when I can remember us fighting for those rights, and it's really hard to believe we're in danger of losing them.

  • IVETTE FELICIANO:

    While the overriding message we heard from people here was anti-Trump, the issues motivating marchers were as diverse as the crowds here.

    Anjum Khan (ph), from Maryland, said she's concerned about Muslim rights and Trump's promise to ban Muslims from entering the country.

  • ANJUM KHAN, DEMONSTRATOR:

    When he said he's going to eradicate Islamic terrorism, that's wonderful! Like, yes, please do that. But in doing that, don't trample on my rights.

  • IVETTE FELICIANO:

    Rohima Miah (ph) has marched on Washington before for civil rights and was among the protesters at the inauguration yesterday.

  • ROHIMA MIAH, DEMONSTRATOR:

    As a black woman with a 30-year-old black son that lives in New York City, it should be an issue for all people — that our children are safe.

  • IVETTE FELICIANO:

    Judy Ames (ph), a gay rights activist since the AIDS epidemic started in the 1980s, was here with a group of gay musicians.

  • JUDY AMES, DEMONSTRATOR:

    We just don't think that women's rights and civil rights and everybody's rights should be just trampled on and thrown away. It's ridiculous.

  • IVETTE FELICIANO:

    The march's wide-ranging policy platform advocated for economic justice for women, keeping abortion access safe and legal, immigration reform, police accountability, union rights, sex worker rights, and environmental protection.

  • RHEA SUH, NRDC:

    Women matter.

    (CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

    And we will not be shy about standing up to what matters to us.

    (CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

    And here's what matters to me: that my daughter inherits a world where a healthy environment is a basic right for all of us.

  • IVETTE FELICIANO:

    March leaders, like actress America Ferrera, whose parents are from Honduras, said their rights are under attack.

  • AMERICA FERRERA, ACTRESS:

    We are America!

    (CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

    And we are here to stay. We will not go from being a nation of immigrants to a nation of ignorance.

  • IVETTE FELICIANO:

    Long-time political activist Gloria Steinem called on the crowd to use their "people power" to keep a close eye on the new president.

  • GLORIA STEINEM, POLITICAL ACTIVIST:

    Trump and his handlers have found a fox for every chicken coop in Washington. And his Twitter finger must not become a trigger finger.

  • IVETTE FELICIANO:

    Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner, the head of the group, Moms Rising, called for equal pay for equal work.

  • KRISTIN ROWE-FINKBEINER, MOMS RISING:

    Women make 80 cents to a man's dollar. Moms earn only 71 cents to a man's dollar, and moms of color earn as low as 46 cents to a man's dollar.

  • IVETTE FELICIANO:

    And activist filmmaker Michael Moore had this word of advice for the assembled women.

  • MICHAEL MOORE, ACTIVIST FILMMAKER:

    You have to run for office! You! Yes, you!

    SEN. KAMALA HARRIS (D), CALIFORNIA: Even if you're not sitting in the White House, even if you're not a member of the United States Congress, even if you don't run a big corporate super PAC, you have the power! And we the people have the power.

  • IVETTE FELICIANO:

    After the speeches, the protesters intended to march about two and a half miles from near the Capitol, along the National Mall, to the White House. But they were unable to do that due to the size of their crowd.

    The same thing happened in Chicago, where 150,000 people turned up for a rally in Chicago's Grant Park — so many more than expected. In New York, some 200,000 people rallied outside the United Nations before marching through Manhattan in support of human and civil rights. In Los Angeles, tens of thousands of demonstrators converged on downtown's Pershing Square.

    Overseas, thousands of Trump protesters took to the streets of London. In Paris, thousands marched near the Eiffel Tower carrying signs saying: "We have our eyes on you, Mr. Trump." Among the thousands of trump protesters in Sydney, Australia, one woman said, "We want to send the sign to the women in the U.S. that we are all in this together."

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