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First Peoples | Preview

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First Peoples
PBS


See how the mixing of prehistoric human genes led the way for our species to survive and thrive around the globe. Archaeology, genetics and anthropology cast new light on 200,000 years of history, detailing how early humans became dominant. FIRST PEOPLES premieres Wednesdays, June 24-July 1, 9:00-11:00 pm ET and July 8, 9:00-10 pm ET on PBS. Continue


Bigger Than T. rex

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NOVA
PBS


Meet Spinosaurus—the lost killer of the Cretaceous and the world's largest carnivorous dinosaur ever. Continue


Episode 3: Your Inner Monkey Preview

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


"Your Inner Monkey" tracks our hands, feet, color vision, spine and upright gait to our primate and hominid progenitors, who also passed on perhaps the most important legacy of all: a path to the human brain. Continue


A Neanderthal Burial

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NOVA
PBS


Scientists think a posed body alongside a panther paw are evidence of Neanderthal rites. Continue


Neanderthals 'R' Us

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NOVA scienceNOW
PBS


Do you have a Neanderthal in your family tree? Continue


Richard Leakey's Life and Work in Kenya

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Bones of Turkana
PBS


A chronicle of the remarkable life of Richard Leakey and the discoveries he, his family and noted colleagues unearth over four decades of exploring Kenya's Turkana Basin in search of clues to man's origins. Continue


Iceman Murder Mystery Preview

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NOVA
PBS


A new forensic investigation of a 5,000-year-old mummy reconstructs his death and reveals an ancient way of life. Premiering October 26, 2011 on PBS Continue


Dinosaur Plague

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NOVA scienceNOW
PBS


Insects caught in amber spark a controversial theory about what killed the dinosaurs. Continue


Do You Have a Thing for Dinosaurs?

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American Experience
PBS


Do you remember first learning about dinosaurs? Have you been to Dinosaur State Park? What do you know about dinos in America? What do you think makes prehistoric creatures so fascinating? Continue


Darwinism and the American West

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American Experience
PBS


Although O.C. Marsh and Charles Darwin lived on separate continents, their discoveries, which would forever shape the field of modern science, intersected in a most unlikely place: the American West. Continue


Molding an identity for dinosaurs and human ancestors

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Equipped with data from dissections and the study of fossils, award-winning John Gurche reconstructs the identity of dinosaurs and human ancestors through art. His work has appeared in National Geographic, on postage stamps, in Continue


Carthage's Lost Warriors

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Secrets of the Dead
PBS


In 146 BC, as the Romans conquered the vast Carthaginian Empire in North Africa, thousands of people fled their homeland. Now, science is suggesting some may have taken refuge thousands of miles away in South America. In addition to the scientific evidence, blonde, blue eyed indigenes suggest that contact with the West occurred long before Columbus arrived. Continue


Carthage's Lost Warriors Preview

Image of Carthage's Lost Warriors Preview
Secrets of the Dead
PBS


In 146 BC, as the Romans conquered the vast Carthaginian Empire in North Africa, thousands of people fled their homeland. Now, science is suggesting some may have taken refuge thousands of miles away in South America. In addition to the scientific evidence, blonde, blue eyed indigenes suggest that contact with the West occurred long before Columbus arrived. Continue


A Neanderthal Burial

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NOVA
PBS


Until recently, scientists have encountered scant evidence of Neanderthal ritual or religious practice. A new discovery, though, suggests that Neanderthals—much like today’s bear hunters—ceremoniously cut off panther paws and kept them as trophies. Continue


Evolution of Laughter

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NOVA scienceNOW
PBS


We’re not the only species that laughs. Continue


Full Episode

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Cave People of the Himalaya
PBS


Everest climber and thrill seeker Pete Athans returns to the Himalayas with Dr. Mark Aldenderfer in search of the caves and mummies of a lost civilization. There they risk their own safety to reveal astonishing evidence of a previously unknown 1,500-year-old death ritual high in the Himalayan caves. Continue


Arctic Dinosaurs - Preview

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NOVA
PBS


With the help of CGI, NOVA breathes life into the polar dinosaurs' lives and environment in vivid detail. 7/27/11 Continue


Where Did We Come From?

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NOVA scienceNOW
PBS


Explore the origin of our solar system and the start of life itself, how head lice figure in human evolution, and more. Continue


Joseph Leidy and Charles Knight

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American Experience
PBS


Joseph Leidy and Charles Knight were prominent American academics who committed their lives and reputations to the young field of paleontology. Leidy participated in the cutthroat race to produce the most prolific and authentic findings on dinosaur fossils in the United States; Charles Knight was a painter who a knowledge of anatomy and paleontology to bring extinct creates to life on canvas. Continue


Dinosaurs by Charles R. Knight

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American Experience
PBS


Charles R. Knight (1874-1953) was one of the first American painters to depict dinosaurs, providing imaginative and largely scientifically based renditions of the extinct beasts. In a time when dinosaurs captured the fascination of people across the country, Knight's ground-breaking images combined paleontology and artistry to create some of the most popular museum displays of his day. Continue


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