FEATURED IN TEACHERS EPISODE

TEACHERS highlights artists committed to sharing their skills and passion for craft with students of all ages. Presented by PBS for Spotlight Education week. Featuring glass artist Mark Mitsuda, Navajo weavers Barbara Teller Ornelas and Lynda Teller Pete, ceramic artist Linda Sikora, and glass artist Therman Statom.

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MARK MITSUDA

Honolulu, Hawaii , Mark Mitsuda​ introduces professional glass forming techniques to his students at Punahou School,  teachers episode

Mark Mitsuda​ grew up in Hawaii and learned the art of glassblowing while in high school at Punahou School where he now teaches teenage students how to blow glass. He continued his studies at the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, earning his BFA in 1992.

BARBARA TELLER ORNELAS & LYNDA TELLER PETE

Navajo weavers Barbara Teller Ornelas, Lynda Teller Pete​, Idyllwild Arts Native American Arts Program teachers episode
CATURDAY. PHOTO: MARK MARKLEY

Barbara Teller Ornelas ​and her sister Lynda Teller Pete​ are fifth generation weavers who were raised behind the Two Grey Hills Trading Post in New Mexico. They carry on their family’s tradition by teaching family members to weave and by mentoring others. This legacy of learning is essential to Navajo weavers.

LINDA SIKORA

Alfred University, School of Art and Design, The College of Ceramics, Professor Linda Sikora,  teachers episode

Linda Sikora is a professor at the School of Art and Design at Alfred University. The porcelain jars and teapots that are her personal work are known for their incredible form and polychrome surfaces. Sikora states, "Jars and teapots are at the front edge of my recent inquiry”. Through them, she explores form and meaning.

THERMAN STATOM

Omaha, Nebraska, Therman Statom​, Studio Glass Movement, Hot Shops Art Center, glass blowing  teachers episode

Therman Statom​, sculptor, glass artist, and painter is known as a pioneer of the contemporary glass movement. His life­size glass ladders, chairs, tables, constructed box­like paintings, and small scale houses bewitch with vibrant colors and spontaneous line work.