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‘Beyond the Streets’ exhibit showcases street art

Graffiti is still often affiliated with blight on city streets. But a new exhibit in New York City called "Beyond the Streets" may help change some of those negative connotations, with work from more than 150 artists from across the globe showcasing their unique styles and interpretations of street art. Hari Sreenivasan has more.

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  • Hari Sreenivasan:

    Graffitti may be finding new homes — instead of on city buildings or train cars, works inspired by graffiti are being displayed in art galleries and shows.

    You might say traditional street art is now going beyond the streets. And that's the name of an exhibit in Brooklyn, New York.

  • Stephen Powers:

    Graffiti is a very simple human emotion made visible.

  • Hari Sreenivasan:

    That's how artist Stephen Powers describes his work. The New York based artist, also known as espo, moved from Philadelphia during the height of New York City's graffiti movement in the 1990s.

    Large buildings are the typical canvases for his graphic designs and street art, but now his work is being showcased inside at the "Beyond the Streets" exhibit in Brooklyn, New York.

  • Stephen Powers:

    What's going on here, these are symbols, they're packets of information, that try to condense the human experience into the smallest package possible.

  • Hari Sreenivasan:

    Work from more than 150 artists from across the globe fill the exhibit. Each showcasing a unique style and interpretation of street art.

    Australian husband and wife artists who call themselves 'DABSMYLA'', use bright colors and floral prints. While artists such as Patrick Martinez transforms typical neon signs popular into tools of activism…

  • Roger Gastman:

    At its core, at its root, graffiti and street art will always be illegal. But it also evolves into other works.

  • Hari Sreenivasan:

    Roger Gastman is curator of "Beyond the Streets."

  • Roger Gastman:

    And they've gone into the studios and they've made complete new bodies of work often inspired by the streets. But it is not work salvaged from the street.

  • Hari Sreenivasan:

    Gastman's own experience with graffiti inspired both the New York exhibit and a similar 2011 exhibit in Los Angeles.

  • Roger Gastman:

    The show is honestly made to educate the public about graffiti, about street art and where the culture has gone and other artists that continue to draw inspiration from this culture.

  • Hari Sreenivasan:

    The two-floor exhibit featuring an in house tattoo parlor every Friday and a fake record store 'Trash Records' is running until August 25th.

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