What do you think? Leave a respectful comment.

Remembering 5 more victims of the coronavirus

Correction: One image in this story has been replaced since it was first posted. The correct graduation photo of Marlowe Stoudamire and his wife Valencia has now been added. NewsHour regrets the error and extends our condolences to the Stoudamire family.

As more states push forward with reopening, the coronavirus continues to enact a devastating toll on families and communities across the country. Each week, we take a moment to remember a few of the remarkable individuals we have lost. Judy Woodruff shares stories of five more.

Read the Full Transcript

  • Judy Woodruff:

    As more states push forward with reopening, the coronavirus continues to enact a devastating toll on families and communities across the country.

    We want to again take a moment to remember a few of the remarkable individuals we have lost.

    Hecky Powell was often referred to as the unofficial mayor of Hecky Powell, Illinois. For 37 years, he ran Hecky's Barbecue. Their famous sauce was created by him and his parents. Hecky employed kids from all walks of life, and that commitment extended beyond his restaurant, to his social work, providing opportunities for struggling youth. The 71-year-old was also a loving father of seven.

    Anyone who knew Loretta Dionisio could see she was tough. Loretta fled martial law in the Philippines in her early 20s and rose to become a graphic designer and creative director in Orlando, Florida. A cancer survivor, she traveled the world with her husband of nearly 50 years. The pair were inseparable.

    Around her family, Loretta's toughness melted away. They say she was the sweetest person. Loretta was 68 years old.

    Seventy-five-year-old Zoao Makumbi was focused, cerebral, and stern, but his daughter says he had a soft spot for children, especially his grandkids. Born in the Congo to Angolan refugees, Zoao led protests in the 1970s for Angolan independence from Portugal. After moving to the U.S. in the 1980s, Zoao worked as a school psychologist in Washington, D.C.

    He was passionate about helping low-income black students overcome trauma and learning disabilities.

    Barry Webber was a renaissance man, a New York City surgeon who could build cars and computers, and also loved the ballet and classical music. His wife, Harriet, says he was quiet and mysterious, but confident in the emergency and operating rooms, and a great teacher. He shared his love for rock climbing with his two boys, Duncan and Michael. Barry was 67 years old.

    Marlowe Stoudamire was a Detroit community activist and entrepreneur, most recently working with the NHL to introduce hockey to urban communities and schools. Marlowe was outgoing, a devoted advocate for underrepresented individuals.

    But family was his priority. He met his wife, Valencia, in biology class when they were 14 years old. He went on to have two children, Shelby and Ian. Marlowe was 43.

    Our hearts go out to the families of all those we have lost and everyone who's lost someone in this pandemic.

Listen to this Segment

The Latest