Clip | Loretta Lynn: Still a Mountain Girl - Duets With Conway Twitty

Loretta Lynn and Conway Twitty (1933 – 1993), both successful singer-songwriters in their own right, together made 11 studio albums between 1971 and 1988. Hits from those country albums included five number 1 songs off five different albums; this film excerpt shows them performing “Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man” and “After the Fire Is Gone.” The duo won the Country Music Association award for Vocal Duo of the Year every year from 1972 to 1975.

Their 1973 album Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man went to Number 1 on the Country Charts, as did the title song. Lynn explains that it was her husband-manager Doo Lynn who found the song for the duo (it was written by Jim Owen and Becki Bluefield).

Country stars Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood (who married in 2005) discuss the power of Lynn’s and Twitty’s voices joining together, and sing “After the Fire Is Gone,” the duo’s first number 1 hit in 1971.

Because of their songs’ lyrics and the easy chemistry between Lynn and Twitty, the status of their relationship was a puzzle to some audiences.

“Everybody thought me and Conway had a thing going. And that’s the farthest from the truth,” says Lynn.  “I loved Conway as a friend, and my husband loved him. Conway was really the only one in the music business that Doo gave a dag-gone for.”

Learn more about Conway Twitty on the official site his family created.

Transcript Print

TWITTY: ♪ Hey, Louisiana woman LYNN: ♪ Mississippi man TOGETHER: ♪ We get together every time we can ♪ ♪ The Mississippi River can't keep us apart ♪ TWITTY: ♪ There's too much love in this Mississippi heart ♪ LYNN: ♪ Too much love in this Louisiana heart ♪ Doolittle found our first song that we recorded together, 'Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man.'

Doolittle found that while we were on tour, yeah.

We come in, and he had that going.

He said, 'I found you-uns a hit song.'

And Conway said, 'I believe you have.'

He looked at me, and I said, 'I think it is a hit.'

We cut it, and it was a hit.

TWITTY: ♪ Hey, Louisiana woman LYNN: ♪ Mississippi man TOGETHER: ♪ We get together every time we can ♪ ♪ The Mississippi River can't keep us apart ♪ TWITTY: ♪ There's too much love in this Mississippi heart ♪ LYNN: ♪ Too much love in this Louisiana heart ♪ BROOKS: When these two voices hit, it creates this dimension that you can't get singular -- one without the other.

YEARWOOD: And that's why I've always enjoyed singing with Garth, you know, for the last 25 years, is that there's an energy there that's created together that isn't separate.

It isn't taking anything away from the singular artist, but it's just something different.

There's an energy there.

I think that's why everybody thought Loretta and Conway were married, you know, or at least having an affair, you know, because it was such a connection, and it just worked.

You know, hit after hit after hit.

LYNN: Everybody thought me and Conway had a thing going, you know.

And that's the farthest from the truth.

I loved Conway as a friend, and my husband loved him.

Conway was really the only one in the music business that Doo gave a daggone for.

-MAN: Really? -LYNN: Yeah.

You'd hear him out, they'd be talking.

You'd hear Conway just, 'Ha ha ha.'

And I'd wonder, 'What the heck is he laughing about?'

And Doo would be telling him big jokes.

Most of them lies. [ Laughs ] But he had him laughing all the time.

TOGETHER: ♪ Love is where you find it ♪ When you find no love at home ♪ ♪ And there's nothin' cold as ashes ♪ ♪ After the fire is gone BROOKS: When Conway and Loretta, that ♪ Do-do-do ♪ Love is where you find it And when they're sitting there, just doing those same waves and everything together, same way with Wynette-Jones, that's -- All of a sudden, man, it just crawls all over you.

And that's something I think you can't get from one of them just doing it by themselves.

YEARWOOD: ♪ Love is where you find it TOGETHER: ♪ When you find no love at home ♪ ♪ And there's nothing cold as ashes ♪ ♪ After the fire is gone