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Kashmir Quake: A Year On, What Has Changed

Men carry corrugated sheets of metal.

Survivors of last year's earthquake, which left more than three million homeless, line up to receive supplies to make temporary shelters.

When October 8 came this year, Pakistanis of all stripes stopped to remember the earthquake that struck at 8:52 a.m. one year ago, killing more than 70,000 people.

For most, it's been a year of remorse and reflection, gratitude for the rush of relief that poured in from around the country and around the world. For others, it's been a time of disappointment, even anger; and some feel downright betrayed. President Gen. Pervez Musharraf, armed with more than $6 billion in aid pledges from the international community, vowed to build back and build better. About one-third of that aid is in the hands of the government, with $500 million already dispersed to help families rebuild their homes. But close to 2 million people are still living in temporary shelters, according to a contested assessment by Oxfam, the international relief agency.

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