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Bishop says royal wedding ‘wove together many different worlds’

In a striking break with English tradition, the first black leader of the U.S. Episcopal Church delivered a passionate sermon at the royal wedding on Saturday, where he referenced Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s beliefs on the "redemptive power of love.” To some, the speech was as significant as the matrimony itself. Alison Stewart talked to Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry about converging cultures.

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  • ALISON STEWART:

    Joining me now via Skype from the United Kingdom is the most Reverend Michael Curry. Reverend thanks for being with us.

  • MOST REV. MICHAEL BRUCE CURRY:

    Sure glad to be with you.

  • ALISON STEWART:

    Your message to this couple today was about the power of love. But there was definitely a message for the rest of the world as well. What do you hope we all take away from today’s ceremony?

  • MOST REV. MICHAEL BRUCE CURRY:

    Well you know I really do hope and pray that that that this day can be a day of renewal for all of us. There was a couple who are deeply in love with each other and you could feel and see their love on their faces and it’s real. And and they chose the text that I used from the Song of Solomon. And it’s just interesting that it comes from a part in that Song of Solomon or Song of Songs is really a low poem found in the Hebrew Scriptures of the Old Testament and so that text actually became the springboard for recognizing that the love between Harry and Meghan between this couple actually was tapping into a greater love that isn’t a matter of sentimentality but actually as a way of life that can change lives and that can change social structures and can change the world in the way in which we live.

  • ALISON STEWART:

    And we need that right now.

  • MOST REV. MICHAEL BRUCE CURRY:

    Yeah yeah we do.

  • ALISON STEWART:

    Your name and and your sermon immediately became popular on Twitter your name started trending immediately and people were tweeting things like we are having church and preach it, pastor. I’m a black Episcopalian so I obviously I recognize that you bring some of the traditions of the black church to this very formal royal ceremony. Tell us a little bit about your thought process there.

  • MOST REV. MICHAEL BRUCE CURRY:

    Well you know it’s it’s funny. I realized that they were the couple really created a service that was very much steeped in the tradition. I mean the service followed the tradition of the Church of England here using various prayer books that they use here. And so it was very traditional in that respect. And yet they wove together many different worlds. And so you had the wonderful choir from St. George’s Chapel. You had the gospel choir singing you had the cello as you had different worlds of music that were being used in the course of the service of worship.

  • ALISON STEWART:

    What did this wedding signal about inclusiveness?

  • MOST REV. MICHAEL BRUCE CURRY:

    Well I think it really does signal in many respects because because the royal couple bring together many different worlds both in terms of ethnicity in terms of nationality in terms of just various kinds of in their ingredients in the backgrounds of their lives they bring a variety of worlds together. When the first chapter of Genesis says that the the man and woman have been placed there to not have dominion in terms of conquering but in terms of being stewards caring for the creation caring for the world. That part of God’s reason for putting us here was not only to care for the world in terms of the creation itself but to care for each other. And when we do that we find that we’re on a path of life that actually works.

  • ALISON STEWART:

    Reverend Curry thank you so much for your time today.

  • MOST REV. MICHAEL BRUCE CURRY:

    Thank you. God bless you.

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