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‘We are with you:’ Cuban protests find youth allies in Little Havana, Miami

Thousands of Cubans took to the streets to protest the failing economy, food shortages and growing number of COVID-19 cases on the island. Fueled by social media, the protests also gained support and solidarity in Miami’s Little Havana, where young people have also taken to the streets. Student Reporting Labs’s Delta Flores, a Gwen Ifill fellow, reports

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  • Hari Sreenivasan:

    Last month thousands took to the streets across Cuba to protest a failing economy, food shortages and a growing number of COVID-19 cases. Drawing support through the power of social media, it was one of the country's biggest anti-government demonstrations in decades. In Miami, Florida, young people continue to gather in the streets to demand change for the Cuban people.

    Student Reporting Lab's Delta Flores, a Gwen Ifill fellow, has the story.

  • Delta Flores:

    The youth of Cuba are leading the call, "Patria y Vida" and the people of Miami are now responding.

  • Jorge Gonzalez:

    What's right, we in the United States value our human rights, our freedom of speech, our freedom of press, every freedom that we have that's not existent in Cuba. It does not exist.

  • Stephanie Sanchez:

    I'm just so inspired by what's happening in the island, especially all young people are taking a stand. And I just want to be part of that as much as I can to show my support.

  • Delta Flores:

    Since the July 11th protests erupted in Cuba, young people have been coming to the streets in Miami's little Havana to show their support.

  • Gabriela Gutierrez:

    The SFC is just a group of students a group of young people, who have the same motivation, drive and passion for a free Cuba and to end the acts against humanity, of this repression that this dictatorship has been doing, for more than 62 years.

  • Delta Flores:

    Sebastian Arcos, Assistant Director of the Cuban Research Institute at Florida International University, says that young Cubans on the island are driving the push for change.

  • Sebastian Arcos:

    They are fed up with the fact that they cannot act independently and can improve their lives independently from the government, that is the nature of the very nature of the totalitarian society. And in Miami is an echo of that.

  • Delta Flores:

    Technology has given this generation of Cubans a tool their older relatives didn't have.

  • Stephanie Sanchez:

    Twitter, Facebook, Instagram. They've been able to enter the Internet despite being blocked from, through VPN services. Hopefully, the president of this country will be able to send the internet over there. And all of that will help you see how life is different as well as the movement. From what's happening today in the march to see the people standing here and demanding action and just letting them know we're not going to leave you alone. We are going to fight for you here as much as we can.

  • Alexia Reyes:

    All their internet is down, the Cuban government they don't want other people to know how they're treating their people so we stand here not only as Hispanic representatives, Cuban representatives, representatives of the youth as well passing on the torch to either young Cubans, young Hispanics or just young people who care about Cuba.

  • Delta Flores:

    The number of young protesters in both Cuba and Miami is giving hope to the older generation.

  • Sebastian Arcos:

    What we're seeing is the passing of the torch from that generation to the next. And this is fundamentally important because older Cubans in Miami and in the island can now rest assured that this fight for freedom will continue. it's a very important sign of hope for the future of Cuba.

  • Delta Flores:

    And the protesters today on Calle echo that sentiment.

  • Jorge Gonzalez:

    My people, keep fighting, we are with you. Miami and the rest of the world—we are with you. Always one hundred percent, and we will not stop until you guys are free.

  • Delta Flores:

    For the PBS Newshour Student Reporting Labs, I'm Delta Flores in Miami, FL.

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