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The School, the Boys, Abe and Ken

PBS Ombudsman
PBS


It's a little slow lately in the ombudsman's office, but a new documentary about teenage boys—combining a small school, an imaginative assignment, Abe Lincoln and Ken Burns—gets a recommendation. Continue


Israel: Negotiators walking away from peace process

Image of Israel: Negotiators walking away from peace process
PBS NewsHour
PBS


A day after rival Palestinian groups Hamas and Fatah announced a new reconciliation deal, Israel said that its negotiators would be walking away from Middle East peace negotiations. Despite the setback, Secretary of State John Kerry, broker of the nine-month peace effort, says he will persist. Gwen Ifill reports Continue


U.S. and Japan tackle trade issues during Obama's visit

Image of U.S. and Japan tackle trade issues during Obama's visit
PBS NewsHour
PBS


During a visit to Japan, President Obama observed traditions and technological innovations, while negotiators worked behind the scenes on a proposed trade pact. While the president vowed protection for Japan, the allies remain divided on a few key issues. Judy Woodruff talks to Mike Mochizuki of The George Washington University and Sheila Smith of the Council on Foreign Relations. Continue


Are private charter schools monopolizing public resources?

Image of Are private charter schools monopolizing public resources?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Charter school enrollment has soared from about 300,000 a little more than a decade ago to nearly 2 million students nationwide. But the expansion of charter schools, whose public funding is supplemented with private donations, has created serious competition for limited resources and space. Special correspondent John Tulenko of Learning Matters reports on the ongoing battle in New York. Continue


Thursday, April 24, 2014

Image of Thursday, April 24, 2014
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Tonight on the program, we examine peace negotiations in Palestine and examine the possibility of Palestinian talks with Israel. Also: the FDA announced it intends to regulate e-cigarettes, whether charter schools are soaking up too many public resources, if the end of net neutrality will halt innovation and President Obama visits Japan. Continue


Charlie Rose on the TIME 100

Image of Charlie Rose on the TIME 100
Charlie Rose: The Week
PBS


This week Charlie Rose was honored with a mention on TIME magazine's annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world. Here, TIME's managing editor Nancy Gibbs talks to Charlie about the selection, and reads him some excerpts from Michael Bloomberg's tribute. Continue


Hip-hop artist Nas

Image of Hip-hop artist Nas
Tavis Smiley
PBS


The hip-hop visionary talks about his successful career and the 20th anniversary of the release of his landmark album, "Illmatic." Continue


Rebel leader denies blame for South Sudan massacre

Image of Rebel leader denies blame for South Sudan massacre
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Bodies were strewn in the streets of the city of Bentiu, South Sudan, when a U.N. convoy arrived in the aftermath of a massacre of civilians. South Sudan’s foreign minister charged that rebels of the Nuer ethnic group are behind the violence. President Obama called the killings an “abomination” and a betrayal of trust for the South Sudanese people. Judy Woodruff reports. Continue


Obama kicks off four-nation Asia tour

Image of Obama kicks off four-nation Asia tour
PBS NewsHour
PBS


President Obama made Tokyo his first stop on tour of Japan, South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines. The trip is the latest step in a stated policy shift toward Asia and away from a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Gwen Ifill reports. Continue


Why the White House is turning its attention to Asia

Image of Why the White House is turning its attention to Asia
PBS NewsHour
PBS


President Obama’s four-nation Asia tour marks a policy shift toward the continent, which has been overshadowed by international concerns in the Middle East, and now the Ukraine crisis. Gwen Ifill talks to former State Department Official Kurt Campbell and Michael Auslin of the American Enterprise Institute about the purpose behind the president’s trip. Continue


News Wrap: Three American doctors killed in Kabul

Image of News Wrap: Three American doctors killed in Kabul
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Thursday, a security guard in Afghanistan shot three American doctors outside a hospital in Kabul. Afghanistan’s health minister called the killings “inhumane and brutal actions,” and lamented their potential harm to the country’s health services. Meanwhile, Ukrainian forces made a show of force against pro-Russian militants in the east, while Russia conducted military exercises. Continue


FDA cracks down on ‘wild west’ of e-cigarettes

Image of FDA cracks down on ‘wild west’ of e-cigarettes
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Food and Drug Administration announced it intends to regulate the ever-growing business of electronic cigarettes, which produce an inhalable nicotine vapor. Under the new guidelines, e-cigarette sales to anyone under the age of 18 would be banned. Judy Woodruff takes a closer look at the regulations with Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products. Continue


Will dismantling net neutrality stymie innovation?

Image of Will dismantling net neutrality stymie innovation?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Federal Communications Commission is on the brink of changing the net neutrality principle, which allows consumers unfettered access to web content, and limits the ability of Internet service providers to block or filter material. New guidelines would allow some companies to charge more for faster service. Gwen Ifill talks to Cecilia Kang of The Washington Post about what’s at stake. Continue


Is the Mideast peace process dead?

Image of Is the Mideast peace process dead?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The nine-month Mideast peace effort suffered its latest blow when Israel announced its negotiators are walking away from the table after a reconciliation deal between rival Palestinian groups. Gwen Ifill talks to Hussein Ibish of the American Task Force for Palestine and Jeffrey Goldberg of Bloomberg View on the elusive prospects for a peace deal. Continue


Gwen's Take: Politics as an Extinct Species

Image of Gwen's Take: Politics as an Extinct Species
Washington Week
PBS


"It is an entirely human condition to pine for the good old days, when candy cost a penny, hopscotch was the best way to spend recess and politicians actually talked to, not only at, one another." Continue


Charlie Rose - The Week TV Schedule

Image of Charlie Rose - The Week TV Schedule
Charlie Rose: The Week
PBS


Charlie Rose - The Week airs Friday nights at 8:30pm ET. Check your local listings. Continue


News Wrap: Rival Palestinian groups reach new reconciliation

Image of News Wrap: Rival Palestinian groups reach new reconciliation
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Wednesday, rival Palestinian groups Hamas and Fatah have reached a deal to form an interim unity government in five weeks, and hold national elections six months later. The American and Israeli governments criticized the move. Also, Russia’s foreign minister accused Washington of engineering the political upheaval that began last fall in Ukraine. Continue


Will violent rivalry tip South Sudan toward famine?

Image of Will violent rivalry tip South Sudan toward famine?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The slaughter of hundreds of civilians is just the latest act of reprisal violence in South Sudan that began as a rivalry between two politicians of different ethnic groups. Judy Woodruff takes a closer look at the root of the crisis, tensions over natural resources and the urgency of humanitarian aid and regional diplomacy with Nancy Lindborg of USAID and Khalid Medani of McGill University. Continue


How should colleges ensure diversity?

Image of How should colleges ensure diversity?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Supreme Court upheld a ban on affirmative action in Michigan; at least seven other states have enacted similar laws. A New York Times study looking at five states found that African-American and Latino enrollment fell immediately at flagship schools. Gwen Ifill gets views from Dennis Parker of the American Civil Liberties Union and Roger Clegg of the Center for Equal Opportunity. Continue


New Hepatitis-C drug raises hope at a hefty price

Image of New Hepatitis-C drug raises hope at a hefty price
PBS NewsHour
PBS


A new drug has a 90 to 100 percent chance of curing the Hepatitis C virus, but costs tens of thousands of dollars for a course of treatment. The announcement by the manufacturer that it earned more than $2 billion in the year’s first quarter raises the question, who should pay when drugs are highly effective, but extremely expensive? Hari Sreenivasan reports on the profits, coverage and costs. Continue


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