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The Mailbag:‘Thief’ ‘Liar’ ‘Old White Men’ Lend Us Your Ears

PBS Ombudsman
PBS


The words in the headline in quotes are from emails from viewers received in the Ombudsman's Office after the first NewsHour segment of an already controversial and potentially historic agreement had aired Tuesday evening. Continue


What to expect from Obama’s climate change plan

PBS NewsHour
PBS


President Obama proposed the toughest regulations in U.S. history to combat climate change, with the most significant rule requiring existing power plants to cut emissions by 32 percent by 2030. But the rules face opposition from Congressional Republicans and lawsuits from the energy industry and coal power states. New York Times reporter Gardiner Harris joins Hari Sreenivasan from Washington. Continue


Why is New York City cracking down on Airbnb?

PBS NewsHour
PBS


Short-term housing rental industry giant Airbnb now lists more than 1 million rooms available in 192 countries. In New York, the debate over how to regulate short-term rentals is the most contentious. In light of a new report by the NY Attorney General that says nearly three-quarters of Airbnb's listings in the city are technically illegal, the city is cracking down. Continue


PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode August 1, 2015

Image of PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode August 1, 2015
PBS NewsHour
PBS


On this edition for Saturday, August 1st, 2015, the Justice Department's stunning investigation of discrimination against black children in the St. Louis family court system, presidential candidates are collecting massive amounts of Facebook data on individual voters, and in our signature segment, a new battle in the sharing economy over Airbnb. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Continue


DOJ: St. Louis court discriminates against black children

Image of DOJ: St. Louis court discriminates against black children
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The U.S. Department of Justice says St. Louis County’s juvenile justice system treats black children more harshly than white children “because of their race.” Reporter for USA Today, Yamiche Alcindor, joins Hari Sreenivasan with more detail. Continue


Hillary Dodges Keystone & A Challenge to John Boehner

Image of Hillary Dodges Keystone & A Challenge to John Boehner
Washington Week
PBS


A new Pew Study shows that Republican trust the presidency has never been at a lower point. Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton -citing conflicts from her tenure as secretary of State- dodges questions about whether the controversial Keystone oil pipeline should be built. And House Speaker John Boehner is fighting off a lone Republican congressman trying to remove him from his position of power. Continue


Georgia segregates kids with disabilities, behavior problems

Image of Georgia segregates kids with disabilities, behavior problems
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Department of Justice has concluded that the state of Georgia is illegally segregating students with disabilities and behavioral issues. A two-year investigation found that some of the programs are even housed in dilapidated buildings once used as all black schools during the Jim Crow era. Judy Woodruff talks to Alan Judd of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Continue


News Wrap: Charleston suspect enters not guilty plea for now

Image of News Wrap: Charleston suspect enters not guilty plea for now
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Friday, Dylann Roof entered a temporary not guilty plea to federal hate crime charges in connection to the killing of nine worshippers at a church in Charleston last month. Also, the wing fragment discovered on an island in the Indian Ocean is on its way to be tested to see whether it comes from a missing Malaysian plane. Continue


Shields and Brooks on police body cameras

Image of Shields and Brooks on police body cameras
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including the indictment of a white police officer for killing a black motorist in Cincinnati, the upcoming first presidential debate among the GOP candidates, plus the ultimate anti-Washington candidate Donald Trump and the populist popularity of Sen. Bernie Sanders. Continue


How many submarines does the U.S. really need?

Image of How many submarines does the U.S. really need?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Navy's formidable fleet of nuclear-armed submarines is approaching the end of its lifespan, and there’s growing debate over how many are needed and how to pay for them. Jamie McIntyre, national security correspondent for Al Jazeera America on special assignment for the NewsHour, got a rare behind-the-scenes look at one of the most powerful weapons ever built. Continue


Recreational drug users recruited for clinical abuse trials

PBS NewsHour
PBS


Major pharmaceutical companies are reportedly recruiting thousands of recreational drug users to test a new generation of medicines that deter addiction, which could have a significant impact in the fight against prescription drug addiction. Financial Times reporter David Crow joins Hari Sreenivasan to explain the drug tests. Continue


PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode August 2, 2015

Image of PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode August 2, 2015
PBS NewsHour
PBS


On this edition for Sunday, August 2, 2015, President Obama pushes for deeper cuts in greenhouse gas emissions, but industries vow to sue to block new regulations, in our signature segment, sowing seeds of diversity in the tech industry by training black and Hispanic teens to code, and taking on Muslim stereotypes through stand-up comedy. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Continue


Are presidential candidates tracking your Facebook profile?

Image of Are presidential candidates tracking your Facebook profile?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Facebook is offering new tools for political candidates, and your personal account could be used in the process. For the first time, Facebook is allowing campaigns to track users’ political comments and likes to create a master list of target voters and potential donors. Ashley Parker, reporter for The New York Times, joins Hari Sreenivasan for more. Continue


Should Uber drivers be considered employees? Viewers respond

PBS NewsHour
PBS


Hari Sreenivasan reads viewer comments on NewsHour Weekend’s report from last week on how the definition of “employee” is changing in the sharing economy -- where companies like Uber and Instacart have taken off. Continue


July 31, 2015

Image of July 31, 2015
Charlie Rose The Week
PBS


Tonight on the program: a look at new revelations about the missing Malaysia Airlines jet with Stephen Ganyard and at the demise of Taliban leader Mullah Omar with Matthew Rosenberg and Peter Bergen. Plus: Doris Kearns Goodwin on LBJ; John Dickerson on 2016; 'New York' editor Adam Moss on Bill Cosby; and a farewell to Jon Stewart, who leaves the Daily Show this week after 16 years. Continue


Countdown to First GOP Debate & Congress' Unresolved Issues

Image of Countdown to First GOP Debate & Congress' Unresolved Issues
Washington Week
PBS


The first Republican presidential debate is less than a week away, and many are speculating about the role businessman Donald Trump will play as he leads the GOP field. Which Republicans will be on the stage to take on Trump? Plus, Congress is heading out of town for its five-week summer recess while leaving some major issues unresolved. Continue


Can higher ed keep inmates from returning to prison?

PBS NewsHour
PBS


The phrase “school to prison pipeline” refers to the link between spending time in failing schools and landing time behind bars. A new pilot program aims to rewrite that saying by creating a “prison to college” pipeline. Special correspondent for education John Merrow reports. Continue


PBS NewsHour full episode July 31, 2015

PBS NewsHour
PBS


Friday on the NewsHour, a promising development in the search for an Ebola vaccine. Also: Opening doors to higher ed for inmates, Georgia under scrutiny for segregating students with disabilities and behavioral issues, the military’s plan to replace aging submarines, Shields and Brooks analyze this week’s news and how Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley changed American political discourse. Continue


How long-lasting is promising Ebola vaccine protection?

PBS NewsHour
PBS


A clinical trial in Guinea found that an experimental vaccine was 75 to 100 percent effective in blocking new infections of the Ebola virus. Hari Sreenivasan speaks to Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health about the vaccine. Continue


When Buckley and Vidal changed political discourse on TV

PBS NewsHour
PBS


The new documentary "Best of Enemies" pinpoints a key moment in broadcasting: a series of debates during the 1968 political conventions between two intellectual giants. William F. Buckley on the right and Gore Vidal on the left attracted a high national audience with intelligence and wit, as well as putdowns and insults. Filmmakers Morgan Neville and Robert Gordon join Jeffrey Brown. Continue


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