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Ben Bradlee: A Very Special Person

PBS Ombudsman
PBS


Ben Bradlee was the right man at the right time; Vietnam and Watergate and the truth awaited him. Continue


Election 2014: Campaign Surrogates Hit the Trail

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Washington Week
PBS


On the Webcast Extra, with less than 2 weeks to Election Day top campaign surrogates like Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin and Michelle Obama are hitting the trail. What's the motivation for these campaign appearances? Some like Sen. Rand Paul, who has a large libertarian following, could be broadening his appeal with Republican voters, says CNBC's John Harwood. Continue


Liberian immigrants face Ebola stigma in U.S.

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


While Manhattan is confronting its first Ebola infection, a Liberian community on Staten Island has been following the devastating toll of the epidemic in West Africa. Hari Sreenivasan reports from “Little Liberia,” where he talks to people who have been affected by the outbreak or have confronted stigma. Continue


Officials try to ease worries about NYC’s first Ebola case

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


New York health officials say an American doctor who contracted Ebola after treating patients in Guinea showed no symptoms for more than a week before falling ill. Dr. Craig Spencer has been isolated and his fiancee and two friends have been quarantined as officials trace his steps. Meanwhile, a nurse who contracted Ebola in Dallas has been declared virus-free. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Continue


Saving lives and bearing witness around the world

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


The New York doctor infected with Ebola was working in Guinea for Doctors Without Borders, a humanitarian organization that deploys specialists to provide medical help in crisis zones all over the world. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro offers a deeper look at the organization’s mission and the risks of its work. Continue


What consumers should know about the Takata airbag recalls

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Automakers have recalled more than 50 million vehicles in 2014. The latest wave impacts certain cars with defective airbags from the Japanese company Takata. The airbags, which can can rupture and blast metal debris, have been linked to at least four deaths. Judy Woodruff speaks with Micheline Maynard of Arizona State University for what consumers drivers should know. Continue


Shields and Brooks on changes if the GOP takes the Senate

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including what Ebola anxiety says about the national mood, as well as what challenges both parties may face going into the November elections. Continue


TTC Extra: Groundbreaking Transgender Rights Case

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To The Contrary
PBS


A veteran and civilian software engineer for the army has won a groundbreaking gender discrimination case. She was called "sir" and "it" by coworkers and management. She was also forced to use a separate bathroom. The Army has agreed to institute new policies to be more sensitive to LGBT people. PANEL: Karin Agness; Avis Jones-DeWeever; Danielle Moodie-Mills; Rina Shah Continue


PBS NewsHour full episode Oct. 23, 2014

Image of PBS NewsHour full episode Oct. 23, 2014
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Tonight on the program, we look at the deadly shooting in Canada, where Prime Minister Stephen Harper has pledged stronger law enforcement in the attacks' wake. Also: how robots and spacesuits could aid Ebola prevention, what Michael Brown's autopsy reveals about his death, bogus credit classes at UNC, the dangers of reporting on Syria and Matthew Broderick and Terrence McNally talk their new show Continue


The obstacles and dangers of reporting on Syria

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Telling the stories of conflict in Syria and Iraq has become prohibitively dangerous for many news organizations; more than 70 journalists have been killed while covering the Syrian war. While a few international reporters remain in the country, much of the reporting is now done from the outside. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Deborah Amos of NPR and John Daniszewski of the Associated Press. Continue


"Being Mortal" - Trailer

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FRONTLINE
PBS


FRONTLINE follows renowned New Yorker writer and Boston surgeon Atul Gawande as he explores the relationships doctors have with patients who are nearing the end of life. In conjunction with Gawande's new book, "Being Mortal, the film explores how doctors—himself included—are often remarkably untrained, ill-suited and uncomfortable talking about chronic illness and death with their patients. Continue


Pre-Election Voter Trends, Gubernatorial Elections, Campaign

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Washington Week
PBS


We look at recent poll results to gauge pre-election voter trends with John Harwood, and Dan Balz explores the toss-up gubernatorial races around the country. Also, Jeanne Cummings reports on the record-setting $4 billion raised this campaign season and how the money is being spent. Plus, Alexis Simendinger on the newest state and federal Ebola protocols. Continue


Tony Bennett goes Gaga on ‘Cheek to Cheek’

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Legendary singer Tony Bennett found an unlikely collaborator in shape-shifting pop superstar Lady Gaga. The two have united for a jazzy album of popular American standards called “Cheek to Cheek.” Jeffrey Brown sits down with Bennett to discuss their hit album and keeping jazz alive. Continue


News Wrap: NYC police call hatchet attack a ‘terrorist act’

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Friday, a hatchet attack on four rookie police officers in New York is being labeled a “terrorist act.” The suspect, who was killed, was a recent convert to Islam but had no ties to international terrorism. Also, a student opened fire in a high school cafeteria in Marysville, Washington, killing one before turning the gun on himself. Three more students are in critical condition. Continue


PBS NewsHour full episode Oct. 24, 2014

Image of PBS NewsHour full episode Oct. 24, 2014
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Friday on the NewsHour, a New York doctor is isolated after being infected with Ebola. Also: Liberian immigrants face stigma, massive recalls for cars with defective air bags, why health reform matters in this election, Shields and Brooks analyze the week’s news, how Doctors Without Borders responds to global crises and an unlikely collaboration between a pop star and a jazz legend. Continue


Will strong feelings about Obamacare influence Ky. election?

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In Kentucky there's a disconnect in public opinion for the Affordable Care Act versus the state's popular health exchange program. Special correspondent Renee Shaw of Kentucky Educational Television reports on how voter opinions of the president’s health care law stands to play a role in how they cast their ballots. Continue


A parent's dilemma: Is soccer safe for kids?

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


NewsHour Weekend correspondent William Brangham, whose three kids all play soccer, explores the sport's potential dangers, particularly those caused by heading the ball. Brangham explores a fledgling movement led by a prominent neurosurgeon and World Cup champion Brandi Chastain, who advocate taking headers out of youth soccer. Continue


The Fight — and the Right — to Vote

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Moyers & Company
PBS


The Supreme Court has upheld Texas' harsh voter ID law for the upcoming midterm elections. The law is part of a nationwide effort to suppress the vote, nurtured by the right’s desire to hold onto power. Bill speaks with Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and Ari Berman, a journalist with The Nation, about the ongoing vote suppression controversy. Continue


News Wrap: Canadian PM pledges strong response to attacks

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Thursday, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper pledged stronger policing and surveillance in the wake of two deadly but seemingly unrelated attacks by suspects with Islamist ties. Meanwhile, lawmakers honored the sergeant-at-arms who shot and killed the gunman. Also, six West Africans who traveled to Connecticut are undergoing a 21-day quarantine for possible exposure to Ebola. Continue


How robots and spacesuits could aid Ebola prevention

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Ebola outbreak is still racing well ahead efforts to contain it. Can science and technology do more to slow the spread and save lives? John Holdren, the president’s top science adviser, sits down with science correspondent Miles O’Brien to discuss designing better safety gear, the outlook for vaccine testing and why the Obama administration is opposed to an Ebola travel ban. Continue


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