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The School, the Boys, Abe and Ken

PBS Ombudsman
PBS


It's a little slow lately in the ombudsman's office, but a new documentary about teenage boys—combining a small school, an imaginative assignment, Abe Lincoln and Ken Burns—gets a recommendation. Continue


Rebel leader denies blame for South Sudan massacre

Image of Rebel leader denies blame for South Sudan massacre
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Bodies were strewn in the streets of the city of Bentiu, South Sudan, when a U.N. convoy arrived in the aftermath of a massacre of civilians. South Sudan’s foreign minister charged that rebels of the Nuer ethnic group are behind the violence. President Obama called the killings an “abomination” and a betrayal of trust for the South Sudanese people. Judy Woodruff reports. Continue


Obama kicks off four-nation Asia tour

Image of Obama kicks off four-nation Asia tour
PBS NewsHour
PBS


President Obama made Tokyo his first stop on tour of Japan, South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines. The trip is the latest step in a stated policy shift toward Asia and away from a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Gwen Ifill reports. Continue


Why the White House is turning its attention to Asia

Image of Why the White House is turning its attention to Asia
PBS NewsHour
PBS


President Obama’s four-nation Asia tour marks a policy shift toward the continent, which has been overshadowed by international concerns in the Middle East, and now the Ukraine crisis. Gwen Ifill talks to former State Department Official Kurt Campbell and Michael Auslin of the American Enterprise Institute about the purpose behind the president’s trip. Continue


Explosive train derailments prompt oil transport concerns

Image of Explosive train derailments prompt oil transport concerns
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The amount of oil being moved around the United States by rail has quadrupled since 2005. A string of explosive train derailments in the U.S. and Canada have prompted the National Transportation Safety Board to work with other agencies on improving the safety of the rail shipments. Judy Woodruff talks to Deborah Hersman, chair of the National Transportation Safety Board. Continue


April 25 Preview: John McCain

Image of April 25 Preview: John McCain
Charlie Rose: The Week
PBS


On Charlie Rose The Week airing April 25, Senator John McCain talks to Charlie Rose about his recent trip to Ukraine and the Baltic states, and outlines what he thinks the Obama Administration is doing wrong in its response to Russia's aggression in the region. Airs 4/25 at 8pm. Check local listings. Continue


Actor-environmentalist Ian Somerhalder

Image of Actor-environmentalist Ian Somerhalder
Tavis Smiley
PBS


A tireless advocate for positive social change and U.N. Goodwill Ambassador, Somerhalder explains his passion for protecting the environment. Continue


Solitary Nation

Image of Solitary Nation
FRONTLINE
PBS


With extraordinary access, award-winning producer and director Dan Edge takes you to the epicenter of the raging debate about prison reform. "Solitary Nation" offers an up-close, graphic look at a solitary confinement unit in Maine’s maximum-security prison with firsthand accounts from prisoners and staff whose lives are forever altered by this troubled system. Continue


Justices consider future of TV and copyright in Aereo case

Image of Justices consider future of TV and copyright in Aereo case
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Supreme Court heard a request by television broadcasters to shut down Aereo, a TV streaming tech startup that has potential to alter the business model of traditional broadcasting. For more on the case, Jeffrey Brown talks to former Acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal and Gary Shapiro, CEO of Consumer Electronics Association. Continue


Biden urges Russia to ‘stop talking and start acting’

Image of Biden urges Russia to ‘stop talking and start acting’
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In a show of solidarity with Ukraine’s embattled interim government, Vice President Biden issued a warning to Russia to follow the agreement struck in Geneva to diffuse tensions. Meanwhile, pro-Russian separatists in Eastern Ukraine continued to defy the accord, and Ukraine’s acting president announced the resumption of “anti-terrorist” operations against the separatists. Gwen Ifill reports. Continue


News Wrap: Rival Palestinian groups reach new reconciliation

Image of News Wrap: Rival Palestinian groups reach new reconciliation
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Wednesday, rival Palestinian groups Hamas and Fatah have reached a deal to form an interim unity government in five weeks, and hold national elections six months later. The American and Israeli governments criticized the move. Also, Russia’s foreign minister accused Washington of engineering the political upheaval that began last fall in Ukraine. Continue


Will violent rivalry tip South Sudan toward famine?

Image of Will violent rivalry tip South Sudan toward famine?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The slaughter of hundreds of civilians is just the latest act of reprisal violence in South Sudan that began as a rivalry between two politicians of different ethnic groups. Judy Woodruff takes a closer look at the root of the crisis, tensions over natural resources and the urgency of humanitarian aid and regional diplomacy with Nancy Lindborg of USAID and Khalid Medani of McGill University. Continue


How should colleges ensure diversity?

Image of How should colleges ensure diversity?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Supreme Court upheld a ban on affirmative action in Michigan; at least seven other states have enacted similar laws. A New York Times study looking at five states found that African-American and Latino enrollment fell immediately at flagship schools. Gwen Ifill gets views from Dennis Parker of the American Civil Liberties Union and Roger Clegg of the Center for Equal Opportunity. Continue


New Hepatitis-C drug raises hope at a hefty price

Image of New Hepatitis-C drug raises hope at a hefty price
PBS NewsHour
PBS


A new drug has a 90 to 100 percent chance of curing the Hepatitis C virus, but costs tens of thousands of dollars for a course of treatment. The announcement by the manufacturer that it earned more than $2 billion in the year’s first quarter raises the question, who should pay when drugs are highly effective, but extremely expensive? Hari Sreenivasan reports on the profits, coverage and costs. Continue


Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Image of Wednesday, April 23, 2014
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Wednesday on the NewsHour, we take a closer look at the ongoing crisis in South Sudan, where hundreds were slaughtered over the weekend. Also: President Obama starts an Asian tour to resuscitate ties, a new, effective Hepatitis-C drug comes with a high price, efforts to make oil transportation safer and a debate on how a Supreme Court decision on will affect college diversity. Continue


John McCain on Vladimir Putin

Image of John McCain on Vladimir Putin
Charlie Rose: The Week
PBS


Senator John McCain talks to Charlie Rose about his recent trip to Ukraine and the Baltic states, and outlines what he thinks the Obama Administration is doing wrong in its response to Russia's aggression in the region. Continue


Economist Joseph Stiglitz

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


The Nobel laureate offers his observations about the effects of inequality on economic growth and development and what can be done. Continue


High Court upholds Mich. ban on affirmative action

Image of High Court upholds Mich. ban on affirmative action
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Dealing a blow to proponents of affirmative action, the Supreme Court ruled 6-2 in favor of a Michigan ballot initiative that banned public colleges from using race as a factor in admissions. For analysis on the court’s reasoning, Gwen Ifill talks to Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal. Continue


News Wrap: Hundreds of civilians slaughtered in South Sudan

Image of News Wrap: Hundreds of civilians slaughtered in South Sudan
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Tuesday, hundreds of people in South Sudan have been killed in what the United Nations is calling ethnic slaughter. Rebels from the ethnic Nuer group seized the city of Bentiu last week and murdered people who sought safety in a mosque, say U.N. officials. Also, the death toll in the South Korean ferry disaster climbed to at least 113, with about 190 still missing. Continue


Should science revive the woolly mammoth?

Image of Should science revive the woolly mammoth?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Researchers are working to bring back extinct animals like the woolly mammoth and passenger pigeon, operating under the belief that reviving such species could restore vanishing habitats. But many biologists suggest these efforts should focus on endangered, rather than extinct, species. Gabriela Quiros and Thuy Vu of KQED have the story. Continue


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