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The School, the Boys, Abe and Ken

PBS Ombudsman
PBS


It's a little slow lately in the ombudsman's office, but a new documentary about teenage boys—combining a small school, an imaginative assignment, Abe Lincoln and Ken Burns—gets a recommendation. Continue


Scientist Ken Caldeira

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


In recognition of Earth Day 2014, one of the leading U.S. scientists on global warming weighs in on the climate change debate. Continue


Rancher’s government dispute draws armed protesters

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In Nevada, armed militia members and states' rights protesters showed up at the site of a dispute between the Bureau of Land Management and a cattle farmer who has refused to pay fees for grazing his animals on public lands for two decades. Rather than risk violence, the BLM released cattle it had seized. Hari Sreenivasan learns more from Ben Botkin of the Las Vegas Review-Journal. Continue


How will U.S. respond if Ukraine conflict doesn’t improve?

Image of How will U.S. respond if Ukraine conflict doesn’t improve?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Ben Rhodes, deputy national security adviser for strategic communications, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the Geneva deal, escalating unrest in Ukraine and the prospect of imposing additional sanctions on Russia. Continue


Political divisions deepen amid unrest in Venezuela

Image of Political divisions deepen amid unrest in Venezuela
PBS NewsHour
PBS


It’s been a year since Venezuela’s Nicolas Maduro -- the hand-picked successor of long-time, charismatic leader Hugo Chavez -- entered office. Demonstrations against rising crime have mushroomed into massive marches over insecurity, scarcity and demonstrator arrests. Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner reports on the basic difficulties facing the citizens of Venezuela. Continue


Remembering the literary magic of Gabriel Garcia Marquez

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Spanish-language author and Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez drew worldwide admiration for the poetic style and magical realism of his many novels and stories. Marquez died Thursday in Mexico City at the age of 87. Hari Sreenivasan talks to writer William Kennedy, a long-time acquaintance of Marquez. Continue


Flooding in Solitary

Image of Flooding in Solitary
FRONTLINE
PBS


It was once believed solitary confinement would reform misbehaving prisoners, turns out it may push them to the brink of insanity. In Solitary Nation, premiering Tuesday, April 22 on PBS and at pbs.org/FRONTLINE, FRONTLINE takes you inside Maine's maximum security prison, where a new warden is trying to move inmates out of solitary, which isn't as easy as you might suspect. Continue


Mexican Catholics self-flagellate in honor of Easter

Image of Mexican Catholics self-flagellate in honor of Easter
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Processions of masked men trudge through the streets of the southern Mexican town of Taxco to mark the beginning of Easter celebrations this weekend. Known as "encruzados," crucified ones in English, these men flog themselves, while carrying thorny brunches, as heavy as 88 pounds, to mimic the suffering of Jesus Christ bearing the cross. Continue


Writer Jackie Collins

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


The über-successful writer reflects on her longevity as a novelist and previews her seventh book featuring the popular Lucky Santangelo character. Continue


After threats of painful cuts, Detroit to protect pensions

Image of After threats of painful cuts, Detroit to protect pensions
PBS NewsHour
PBS


When Detroit declared bankruptcy, the pensions of city workers faced deep pension cuts — some as high as 34 percent. After protests, these cuts have been scaled back and Detroit is drawing closer to a deal on how to protect against such drastic pension reductions. Judy Woodruff gets the story from Christy McDonald of Detroit Public Television. Continue


Author Philip Yancey

Image of Author Philip Yancey
Tavis Smiley
PBS


The "Christianity Today" editor-at-large describes his new text, "The Question That Never Goes Away," in which he shares how to face challenges to faith. Continue


Ukraine Crisis, Defending Obamacare, Campaign Fundraising

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Washington Week
PBS


The high-level talks between the U.S., Russia, Ukraine and the E.U. to find a diplomatic solution in Ukraine, President Obama defends the healthcare law, the surge in political fundraising and a closer look at the two ongoing investigations into domestic terrorism. Joining Gwen: Peter Baker, The New York Times; Molly Ball, The Atlantic; Matea Gold, Washington Post; Pete Williams, NBC News. Continue


Shields and Brooks on Keystone politics

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s news, including the Keystone pipeline decision delay, a conflict in Nevada over private use of public land, Putin’s motives in the ongoing Ukraine crisis and the ramifications of awarding the Pulitzer Prize to reporting based on the Edward Snowden leaks. Continue


News Wrap: Keystone oil pipeline decision delayed again

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Friday, the State Department extended the federal review of the controversial plan to add on to the Keystone oil pipeline, citing a Nebraska legal fight for the delay. Environmental groups welcomed the news, but House Speaker John Boehner called it “shameful.” Also, an avalanche on Mount Everest killed at least 12 Sherpa guides. Continue


Pro-Russian protesters hold ground despite deal

Image of Pro-Russian protesters hold ground despite deal
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Despite a deal brokered by diplomats in Geneva to end a standoff in Eastern Ukraine, pro-Russian protesters don't seem likely to give up the territory they've seized in several cities. Lindsey Hilsum of Independent Television News reports from Donetsk on the status of the separatist movement. Continue


Friday, April 18, 2014

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Tonight on the program, we examine pro-Russian protesters in Eastern Ukraine who are holding their ground despite a tentative deal. Also: a cattle rancher's standoff with the U.S. government, political unrest in Venezuela creating political divisions, Mark Shields and David Brooks analyze the week's top stories and remembering author Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Continue


TTC Extra: The Perfect Man and Woman?

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To The Contrary
PBS


Men and women's perception of the "perfect" body varies, according to a new poll conducted by a lingerie company. PANEL: Progressive Magazine Editor-in-chief Ruth Conniff, Former EEOC Chair Cari Dominguez, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), The Heritage Foundation’s Genevieve Wood Continue


What the 1% Don't Want You to Know

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Moyers & Company
PBS


Bill talks with economist Paul Krugman about a new book that's the talk of academia, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty. It shows that two-thirds of America's increase in income inequality over the past four decades results from steep raises given to the country's highest earners. Krugman says: "We’re becoming very much the kind of society we imagined we're nothing like." Continue


News Wrap: Families blame captain for ferry disaster

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Thursday, crews searched for the more than 270 people still missing after a ferry disaster off the southern coast of South Korea. At least 20 deaths have been confirmed. Meanwhile, the coast guard is investigating reports that the ferry captain abandoned the vessel. Also, a U.N. report shows Tehran has cut its most sensitive nuclear stockpile by nearly 75 percent. Continue


Understanding and responding to homegrown terrorism

Image of Understanding and responding to homegrown terrorism
PBS NewsHour
PBS


When random violence strikes on home soil, what do we call it and how do we prosecute it? Lisa Monaco, assistant to the president for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, talks to Gwen Ifill about domestic terrorism, including why we must try to understand what draws people to extremism and who should be responding. Continue


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