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The Mailbag:‘Thief’ ‘Liar’ ‘Old White Men’ Lend Us Your Ears

PBS Ombudsman
PBS


The words in the headline in quotes are from emails from viewers received in the Ombudsman's Office after the first NewsHour segment of an already controversial and potentially historic agreement had aired Tuesday evening. Continue


Footage of DuBose death contradicts indicted cop's claim

PBS NewsHour
PBS


Ray Tensing, a white police officer, was indicted on murder charges for killing Samuel DuBose, a black motorist, during a traffic stop for not having a front license plate. Tensing said he was dragged by the car and forced to shoot DuBose, but body camera footage revealed a different sequence of events. Gwen Ifill learns more from Sharon Coolidge of the Cincinnati Enquirer. Continue


How do we ensure Medicare and Medicaid longevity?

Image of How do we ensure Medicare and Medicaid longevity?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Fifty years since Medicare and Medicaid were established, the programs cover the health care needs of more than 120 million Americans. But new projections underscore worries over long-term sustainability. Judy Woodruff speaks to two former secretaries of the Department of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius and Louis Sullivan, about the successes and challenges. Continue


Why is word of Mullah Omar’s death coming out now?

Image of Why is word of Mullah Omar’s death coming out now?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Taliban's supreme leader Mullah Mohammad Omar was confirmed dead by a spokesman for Afghanistan's intelligence agency, which claims that he died two years ago at a hospital in Pakistan. Although Omar has not been seen publicly since 2001, the Taliban was issuing statements in his name as recently as two weeks ago. Judy Woodruff talks with Jessica Donati of Reuters. Continue


News Wrap: Turkey strikes new round of Kurdish targets

Image of News Wrap: Turkey strikes new round of Kurdish targets
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Wednesday, Turkish jets launched new airstrikes on Kurdish rebel targets in Northern Iraq overnight. Turkey's prime minister warned that it won't end attacks until rebel fighters withdraw. Also, Rep. Chaka Fattah, D-Pa., was indicted on federal racketeering and bribery charges for allegedly misusing charitable donations and campaign money. Continue


How a student history project reunited a family

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Decades after losing touch, family members from two different continents were reunited at the American Cemetery in Normandy, France, to honor a World War II soldier who was killed in action just after the D-Day invasion. The NewsHour’s April Brown reports on the educational program that brought them together. Continue


Actor Colin Farrell

Image of Actor Colin Farrell
Tavis Smiley
PBS


The Golden Globe-winning actor discusses his role in season two of HBO's hit series, "True Detective." Continue


How slavery and murder goes unpunished on the high seas

Image of How slavery and murder goes unpunished on the high seas
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The global economy and our daily lives have become increasingly dependent on shipping, as millions of ships carry roughly 90 percent of the world's goods. But we know little of the crime and lawlessness that takes place at sea. Ian Urbina of The New York Times joins William Brangham to discuss cases of murder, enslavement and pollution and why little can be done to stop it. Continue


How Dr. Seuss’s publisher helped finish a forgotten book

PBS NewsHour
PBS


In 2013, an unfinished book by Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, was discovered in a box. Now “What Pet Should I Get” has been published and become an instant bestseller. It was completed by Cathy Goldsmith, who worked with Geisel on his last six books. Goldsmith and children's book author and illustrator Greg Pizzoli join Jeffrey Brown. Continue


Is there a connection between Pollard release and Iran deal?

Image of Is there a connection between Pollard release and Iran deal?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Lawyers for convicted spy Jonathan Pollard announced today that he would be granted parole after nearly 30 years. Pollard, a former Naval intelligence analyst, was convicted of selling classified information to Israel. Judy Woodruff discusses the case with Devlin Barrett from The Wall Street Journal. Continue


PBS NewsHour full episode July 29, 2015

Image of PBS NewsHour full episode July 29, 2015
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Wednesday on the NewsHour, a white police officer is indicted for killing a black motorist in Cincinnati. Also: What the death of a Taliban leader means for peace in Afghanistan, the Supreme Allied Commander of NATO on the growing Russian threat, a new discovery at the historic Jamestown settlement, 50 years of Medicare and Medicaid and a reunion for a family out of touch since World War II. Continue


A Catholic enigma found in a grave at Jamestown

Image of A Catholic enigma found in a grave at Jamestown
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In 2013 archaeologists discovered the remains of four early colony leaders buried 400 years ago at the Jamestown settlement in Virginia. On top of one of the graves was a silver box resembling a religious artifact, presenting a mystery for researchers. Jeffrey Brown learns more from James Horn of the Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation. Continue


NATO Commander on the ‘major threat’ of Russia

PBS NewsHour
PBS


Gen. Philip Breedlove, NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander Europe, joins Gwen Ifill to discuss the alliance with Turkey against the Islamic State and why Russia poses a major threat in Europe today. Continue


NATO steps up Ukraine mission in response to Russia

Image of NATO steps up Ukraine mission in response to Russia
PBS NewsHour
PBS


There's been a spike this year in Russian air incursions near NATO countries, including the U.S. NATO countries have stepped up military exercises in Ukraine and across the Baltic states in response to Russia's actions. Gwen Ifill reports. Continue


Treasure hunters strike gold off Florida coast

Image of Treasure hunters strike gold off Florida coast
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our NewsHour Shares video of the day, divers made the find of a lifetime in shallow waters of Florida’s Atlantic coast – more than $1 million worth of sunken Spanish coins and treasure. Continue


July 31 Preview: Adam Moss

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Charlie Rose The Week
PBS


On the show this week, New York magazine editor Adam Moss talks about his publication's global reach, the challenges of publishing in the digital age and why New York went biweekly. Continue


Is cancer the legacy left by world's first atomic bomb test?

Image of Is cancer the legacy left by world's first atomic bomb test?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


This July marks the 70th anniversary of the first ever test of an atomic bomb in New Mexico. But a group called the Downwinders -- local residents whose homes were downwind of the blast site -- aren't celebrating the milestone. People here believe the radiation from the bomb has caused a spike in cancers in their communities. Special correspondent Kathleen McCleery reports. Continue


Teens sing in support of Black Lives Matter

Image of Teens sing in support of Black Lives Matter
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our NewsHour Shares moment of the day, a teen a capella group from Oakland, California, use the stage to pay homage to the Black Lives Matter movement. Continue


How slavery and murder goes unpunished on the high seas

PBS NewsHour
PBS


The global economy and our daily lives have become increasingly dependent on shipping, as millions of ships carry roughly 90 percent of the world's goods. But we know little of the crime and lawlessness that takes place at sea. Ian Urbina of The New York Times joins William Brangham to discuss cases of murder, enslavement and pollution and why little can be done to stop it. Continue


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