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Brooks & Son: An Unofficial Disclosure

PBS Ombudsman
PBS


Should David Brooks and the NewsHour have disclosed that Brooks’ son joined the Israeli military? The ombudsman thinks so. Continue


Singer-songwriter-musician Marty Stuart

Image of Singer-songwriter-musician Marty Stuart
Tavis Smiley
PBS


The Grand Ole Opry star and country music archivist reflects on his career and his latest release, "Saturday Night/Sunday Morning." Continue


News Wrap: IS claims it took U.S. air-dropped weapons

Image of News Wrap: IS claims it took U.S. air-dropped weapons
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Islamic State fighters in Syria have reportedly taken weapons air-dropped by the U.S. for Kurdish fighters in Kobani. Meanwhile, in Baghdad, a series of bombings left 30 people dead in Shiite districts. In Hong Kong, student leaders sat down with local government officials, but the student-led pro-democracy demonstrations have not come to an end. Continue


New York Times writer explores masculinity in memoir

Image of New York Times writer explores masculinity in memoir
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In his biweekly column, New York Times writer Charles M. Blow seeks clarity out of complicated news events. The same search for transparency is seen in his new memoir, “Fire Shut Up in My Bones,” which chronicles a childhood punctuated by sexual abuse and lifetime spent navigating masculinity and sexuality. Jeffrey Brown speaks with Blow about his new book and the growth of the American South. Continue


Two newcomers vie for Georgia’s open Senate seat

Image of Two newcomers vie for Georgia’s open Senate seat
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In Georgia, the race for an open Senate seat is dividing voters between Republican David Perdue and Democrat Michelle Nunn. Both seek to distance themselves from President Obama’s policies while gathering support from white and African-American voters who often diverge on party lines. Judy Woodruff reports the southern voter mindset from Atlanta. Continue


Paralyzed man walks after transplanted cells

Image of Paralyzed man walks after transplanted cells
PBS NewsHour
PBS


A Bulgarian man who was paralyzed from the chest down after a 2010 stabbing can now walk after a pioneering transplant in Poland. Cells from the man’s nose were used to repair his spinal nerves in a surgery that gives thousands of palaytics new hope for movement. Alex Thompson of Independent Television News has the report. Continue


PBS NewsHour full episode Oct. 21, 2014

Image of PBS NewsHour full episode Oct. 21, 2014
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Tuesday on the NewsHour, we talk to CDC director on the new safety guidelines for Ebola care. Also: the race for an open senate seat in Georgia, a new surgery enables a paralyzed man to walk again, how fashion designer Oscar de la Renta helped define American style, ‘zombie start-ups’ struggle to survive in Silicon Valley, the Royals’ rise to the World Series and a memoir on overcoming abuse. Continue


News Wrap: Libyan pleads not guilty to Benghazi charges

Image of News Wrap: Libyan pleads not guilty to Benghazi charges
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Monday, Ahmed Abu Khattala pleaded not guilty to U.S. charges related to the 2012 attack on the American consulate in Benghazi. Also, despite a cease-fire announced between the Nigerian government and Boko Haram, fighting continued over the weekend. The military reported that at least 25 militants were killed. Continue


Dozens cleared from Ebola quarantine in Texas

Image of Dozens cleared from Ebola quarantine in Texas
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Dozens of people who had initial contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian man who died of Ebola in Dallas, were deemed safe to leave quarantine after weeks of monitoring. More than 100 others, including those who cared for him, are still being watched. Meanwhile, Nigeria was declared Ebola-free by the World Health Organization. Gwen Ifill reports. Continue


Will voter ID confusion affect November turnout?

Image of Will voter ID confusion affect November turnout?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In 18 states, recent court rulings have changed requirements in the weeks before Election Day. Special correspondent Kelley McHenry of UNC-TV reports on the confusion over the new regulations in North Carolina. Gwen Ifill sits down with Stu Rothenberg of the Rothenberg Political Report and Susan Page of USA Today to discuss factors that could swing the vote. Continue


"Being Mortal" - Trailer

Image of "Being Mortal" - Trailer
FRONTLINE
PBS


FRONTLINE follows renowned New Yorker writer and Boston surgeon Atul Gawande as he explores the relationships doctors have with patients who are nearing the end of life. In conjunction with Gawande's new book, "Being Mortal, the film explores how doctors—himself included—are often remarkably untrained, ill-suited and uncomfortable talking about chronic illness and death with their patients. Continue


Latino politics scholar Gary Segura

Image of Latino politics scholar Gary Segura
Tavis Smiley
PBS


The chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee weighs in on the controversial voting rights issue. Continue


Will the Royals cap their story with a fairytale ending?

Image of Will the Royals cap their story with a fairytale ending?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Kansas City Royals’ meteoric rise from Midwestern underdog to American League champs has electrified its hometown. Tonight, before the faceoff with World Series veterans, the San Francisco Giants, Gwen Ifill speaks Mike Pesca of Slate and Hampton Stevens of The Atlantic about the state of play that allowed an unlikely team to rise through the ranks. Continue


Oscar de la Renta leaves legacy at the runway, White House

Image of Oscar de la Renta leaves legacy at the runway, White House
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Designer Oscar de la Renta, who designed gowns for public women of all ages, died Monday at the age of 82. Known for elegant cuts and bright colors, de la Renta defined American style for more than a quarter of a century. Continue


New protocols for healthcare workers, airport screenings

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Department of Homeland Security has directed travelers entering the U.S. from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea to five airports for further screening before entering the country. The new travel protocol comes after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new safety plans for healthcare workers. Gwen Ifill speaks with Dr. Thomas Frieden of the CDC. Continue


When to pull the plug on a dying startup company

Image of When to pull the plug on a dying startup company
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The startup scene has exploded on the tech market with good ideas and some not-so-good ideas. Special correspondent Steve Goldbloom examines the process that startups go through to become solid businesses and how unsuccessful business get canned. Continue


Actress Kristen Stewart, October 20, 2014

Image of Actress Kristen Stewart, October 20, 2014
Tavis Smiley
PBS


With the "Twilight" film franchise behind her, Stewart talks about her work in a series of interesting indie films, including "Camp X-Ray." Continue


U.S. airdrops military aid for Kurds fighting IS

Image of U.S. airdrops military aid for Kurds fighting IS
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The U.S. stepped up efforts to save the border town of Kobani from the Islamic State with an airdrop of weapons, ammunition and supplies from the Kurdish authorities. In a change, Turkey said it would help Iraqi Kurdish fighters travel to join the fight, but it also stressed that more aid should go to rebel factions trying to oust Syria's president. Margaret Warner reports. Continue


Driving an ambulance in Ebola-ravaged Liberia

Image of Driving an ambulance in Ebola-ravaged Liberia
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In Liberia’s capital Monrovia, ambulance crews go around the city, picking up bodies as well as sick patients who have been infected with Ebola. Video journalist Ben Solomon spent three weeks shadowing a nurse for this New York Times report. Continue


Former GOP leader Bob Dole tells lawmakers to ‘get together’

Image of Former GOP leader Bob Dole tells lawmakers to ‘get together’
PBS NewsHour
PBS


At 91 years old, former Sen. Bob Dole is still traversing his home state of Kansas to thank his supporters for five terms in the Senate. Judy Woodruff sits down with Dole to discuss how Washington has changed since he was in office, his activism for disabled Americans, President Obama’s foreign policy and what he expects from the upcoming election. Continue


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